Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 8/18/2004 6:48:23 AM EST
How many of you home school your kids? do you find that the schools are hostile to the idea of home schooling?

Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:49:53 AM EST
I don't have kids, but if I ever do, I hope to be able to go that route....
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:50:42 AM EST
Home school here.


Hositile?

I am the hostile one...not them.

SGtar15
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:53:23 AM EST
my little brother homeschooled for most of elementary and some middle school
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:55:38 AM EST
We have been homeschooling our kids for the last three years.
Never any hostility or problems.
Texas is very homeschool friendly.

Link Posted: 8/18/2004 6:56:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 6:59:42 AM EST by mjohn3006]
I don't have kids yet...but I WAS home schooled.

I plan on doing a mix like I had. I think some of both is good. I was home schooled through High School. It changed my life for the better.

You want to talk social interaction. I was a shy introvert who never stood up for himself and was one of the "nerds". After home schooling, I went to college. Self confident, mildly extroverted, and my friends and I were the "popular" ones. New man.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:05:27 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 7:09:59 AM EST by Greenhorn]
I and my six siblings, as well as two of my cousins, have been home-schooled our entire lives.

Of course public schools are hostile to the idea of home-schooling. It lowers their funding. They don't care that home schooling leads to smarter, more knowledgeful kids who are close to their parents, who don't have to worry about bullies, who have one-on-one interaction between them and their teacher (parents) instead of being in a group of kids being taught the same thing the same way at the same time no matter how the individual kid thinks and learns. They're just afraid that public schools will eventually go the way of the dodo. They don't care about the kids, they care about their jobs. That's why we have so many messed-up kids nowadays.

I wrote a paper on the subject of home-schooling for college last year, but I'm not sure the subject of this thread asks for it. But I'm very pro-home-schooling, so almost any excuse will do.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:16:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
I wrote a paper on the subject of home-schooling for college last year, but I'm not sure the subject of this thread asks for it. But I'm very pro-home-schooling, so almost any excuse will do.



Aw, c'mon, post it. Or IM for an e-mail address.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:17:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 7:18:21 AM EST by BigButch301]
My wife and I homeschool four children in Md. The oldest is a senior in HS and the youngest is 10 and in 5th grade now.

We have no problems with the local schools. No hostility, no no problems . One of the main reasons they go so easy on us is that we are part of a very well regulated and accredited homeschool organization that grades most of our children's work. Since they monitor our progress and have accreditation we are no longer monitored by the schools.

With our kids so heavily involved in Scouting, church, youth group and volunteer activities no one really seems to bother us. The behavior and accomplishment of my children speaks for itself.

her
George

"How hard can it be?"
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:17:33 AM EST
Homeschooling our 2 oldest, and will homeschooling the 3rd when she is old enough.

The state of Colorado puts a higher burden on homeschoolers than it does the public or private schools. I call it discrimination, but they say it is for the children

My kids test well above their grade, and they read everything they can get their hands on. They know how to think and problem solve. My 7 year old can already hack the computer.

Public schools are a travesty. They are simply a daycare center for most people. If you really cared about your children, you would never put them in public school, if you had any other choice.

The choice is hard, we lose about 40-50K a year in income that my wife could be making, and we have to pay out for curriculum. Plus we still have to pay for public school/daycare that we do not use.


I am not militant about it, but I do state my views when asked, and I can defend my position when attacked.

If you are considering it, please do it, it is worth it.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:21:21 AM EST
You have to PAY for public school even if your kids aren't in one? WHAAAAT? I'd be militant about that!
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:21:40 AM EST
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:32:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............




Actually this is not the case in most instances, my children behave very well, and can converse with adults. They know what is right and what is wrong. They learn social skills from one another, they fuss and fight with one another, and then work it out.

I don't need to force societies ills on them to help them develop. Who needs to be raised in a system with wannabe gang bangers, sluts, rapists, thieves, and drug dealers? Since when is a teacher better qualified to raise my children than I?

Not attacking you cy, but yours is the common mantra of those that are against homeschooling.

As a sheriff, how many homeschooled kids did you have to arrest?
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:33:08 AM EST
It's a double-edged sword. Some of my neighbors home school their kids & those kids are very smart & likable. The mother does the teaching for the most part & she has a degree in Elementary Education & she has taught public school before her kids reached school age.

My concern is that there is apparently no requirement for the teacher to have any certification or training. I have some friends who are going to home school their daughter this fall, starting her in first grade. Again, the mother will be doing most of the schooling. In this case however, neither the mother nor the father have any degrees beyond high school, although the mother has taken quite a few business courses & some liberal arts courses. Neither parent is dumb. In fact, they make a good living through street smarts & hard work.

What happens when the child learns all that the parent knows? (I realize that isn't practical, but suppose that the parent teacher is bad with high school Chemistry, Physics, etc?)

Comments?
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:36:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............



Wow. That was a very ignorant generalization...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:37:07 AM EST
I was home schooled from 5th grade till 12th. I got my high school diploma through a correspondence school out in PA.

Its a decision that has to be made based on the rating of your local school system. Alot of school system are top notch, others suck.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:38:36 AM EST
My little brother was home schooled from 6th to 10th grade. His school was VERY supportive. In fact, they probably would have paid my mother to keep home schooling him. Some of his hijinks included jumping up and down on his desk, cutting the pony tail off the girl in front of him, and jamming an eraser so far up his nose that the ER had to remove it.

In fairness to my little bro, he is a high functioning autistic, and he has learned to control himself very well in adulthood. You'd be hard pressed to know what a little nut he was eight years ago.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:39:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............



Go to your local mall and look at the semi-literate circus freaks that the public schools are churning out - they can't make change without the register telling them what to do, and should they ever escape from the world of minimum wage it will be menial labour for a foreign owned master firm. Couple that with teachers who are forbidden from maintaining discipline (thank you ACLU) and an educational association whose sole goal is permanent employment for it's members, and there is no way I would subject any kid to the mental meat grinder that is the public school system.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:40:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By hardcase:
It's a double-edged sword. Some of my neighbors home school their kids & those kids are very smart & likable. The mother does the teaching for the most part & she has a degree in Elementary Education & she has taught public school before her kids reached school age.

My concern is that there is apparently no requirement for the teacher to have any certification or training. I have some friends who are going to home school their daughter this fall, starting her in first grade. Again, the mother will be doing most of the schooling. In this case however, neither the mother nor the father have any degrees beyond high school, although the mother has taken quite a few business courses & some liberal arts courses. Neither parent is dumb. In fact, they make a good living through street smarts & hard work.

What happens when the child learns all that the parent knows? (I realize that isn't practical, but suppose that the parent teacher is bad with high school Chemistry, Physics, etc?)

Comments?



There are different ways to handle this, here are a couple:

The local community college is available for classes that a parent teacher might not feel comfortable with.

Tutors, to help with that subject.

Or heaven forbid, the parent takes a little more initative, and actually learns the subject matter themselves.

Amazing what can happen to someones life when they accept responsibility for learning and teaching.

Heck, people could learn a lot more if they would shut off the tv.......
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:42:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By hardcase:

My concern is that there is apparently no requirement for the teacher to have any certification or training.



Please keep in mind the difference between certification and qualification. Not a flame, just want to make sure the difference between a piece of paper and actual ability is remembered.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:53:19 AM EST
We'll probably be home-schooling our daughter this coming year. She's been going to a private
school, where my wife also happens to work, but as of now, it appears that my wife's job is going to
'disappear' so that the new superintendent can have more funds for perks for himself, or those who
traverse the office on knee-pads.

(Such as the new office that his wife, who just happens to have been given the newly evacuated, but
never posted, job of children's ministries now has. That is three times the size of her
contemporaries, new carpetting, etc...)
[/rant-mode off]

My wife has a teaching degree, and has taught in both private and public schools, plus is friends with
a lot of the others in our church who also homeschool. So between the two of us, and the other
parents, she'll get a great education.

Luckily, I was just given a raise, so my increase will pretty much cover what we'll be losing from
her not working. But the house will be a LOT cleaner, she'll be doing more of the cooking, and they'll
both be happier, so in the long run, I think that it'll be a good deal all the way around.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:04:47 AM EST

Originally Posted By JKiser:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............



Wow. That was a very ignorant generalization...



Ignorance indeed considering home schooled children by any measure taken are more successful and less prone to have trouble than their public school counter parts.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:21:50 AM EST

Originally Posted By thedave1164:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............




Actually this is not the case in most instances, my children behave very well, and can converse with adults. They know what is right and what is wrong. They learn social skills from one another, they fuss and fight with one another, and then work it out.

I don't need to force societies ills on them to help them develop. Who needs to be raised in a system with wannabe gang bangers, sluts, rapists, thieves, and drug dealers? Since when is a teacher better qualified to raise my children than I?

Not attacking you cy, but yours is the common mantra of those that are against homeschooling.

As a sheriff, how many home schooled kids did you have to arrest?

I can not say it is not a question asked by an arresting Officer ??

I will not say all home schooled kids will fail in life , just the majority .
And I sure am not attacking you either , it is just that when a child is home schooled he misses a lot of the "bad" stuff that comes with a public education, confrontations with bullies , conflicts -- these are all in themselves learning experiences -------- that help one latter in life, don't you think so ?
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:38:35 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:


I will not say all home schooled kids will fail in life , just the majority .



What do you base this assertion on? These kids are generally much better educated that the PS kids, and are taught solid values and morality by their parents. Most home schooling curriculum is strong on patriotic themes and civics issues. These kids are on their way to being good citizens.

How about keeping track of the punks you arrest. Compare how many have been home schooled and how many are products of the .gov mills.


And I sure am not attacking you either , it is just that when a child is home schooled he misses a lot of the "bad" stuff that comes with a public education, confrontations with bullies , conflicts -- these are all in themselves learning experiences -------- that help one latter in life, don't you think so ?



The trade off is that the kid in public school often misses out on the EDUCATION part.

We've experienced both home schooling and private (church based) schools. I don't think I'm having a negative effect on my daughters' development by depriving her of the opportunity to be beat up for her lunch money.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 8:40:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............


once again, you have no idea what you are taking about......at least you are consistent.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 9:01:46 AM EST

Originally Posted By endersgame:
We have been homeschooling our kids for the last three years.
Never any hostility or problems.
Texas is very homeschool friendly.




+1. We've been homeschooling for the last 2 years.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 9:17:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:

Originally Posted By thedave1164:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............




Actually this is not the case in most instances, my children behave very well, and can converse with adults. They know what is right and what is wrong. They learn social skills from one another, they fuss and fight with one another, and then work it out.

I don't need to force societies ills on them to help them develop. Who needs to be raised in a system with wannabe gang bangers, sluts, rapists, thieves, and drug dealers? Since when is a teacher better qualified to raise my children than I?

Not attacking you cy, but yours is the common mantra of those that are against homeschooling.

As a sheriff, how many home schooled kids did you have to arrest?

I can not say it is not a question asked by an arresting Officer ??

I will not say all home schooled kids will fail in life , just the majority .



Oddly enough, studies show that homeschooled kids are more involved in life than their public school counerparts. They actively participate in civics and politics, and are much more conservative overall. So, where are you getting your information from?


And I sure am not attacking you either , it is just that when a child is home schooled he misses a lot of the "bad" stuff that comes with a public education, confrontations with bullies , conflicts -- these are all in themselves learning experiences -------- that help one latter in life, don't you think so ?



You are some completely out of touch with how homeschooling works that it's unbeleivable.

My daughter participates actively in soccer, girl scouts, church activities, and neighborhood play groups on a regular basis. She also participates in a local homeschool group where she interacts with other homeschooled children and their parents.

You say they won't deal with bullies? Last week my daughter was confronted by a bully on the playground, and she dealt with him apporpriately. So how exactly is my homeschooled child missing out on learning experiences? How are my wife and I being overprotective? And seeing as how she's five and already doing work on a 3rd grade level, how is it possible we could be neglecting her education?

You, sir, are ignorant.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 9:17:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 10:08:41 AM EST by Greenhorn]
Edited: Hey Cyanide, read and learn.

OK, here's my paper I wrote a year ago. The article I refer to is at www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,49573,00.html


In her April 5th, 2002 article on www.foxnews.com, Robin Wallace writes about home schooling from the point of view of experts in the field and those who have experienced it. She shows that while home schooling may have certain problems, it can be much better than public schooling when done properly. She shows that home-schooled children tend to be closer as a family, more willing and better equipped to learn, and grow up with a “better sense of self”.

She begins the article with the teaser paragraph, “Playground bullies and prom-night jitters. Lunchroom hijinks and locker room humiliations. The necessary stuff of cherished school memories, or traumas best left behind in the hallways of high school?” Related to this point, J. Gary Knowles, a researcher who studies home schooling, comments on the culture of public school later in the article, “We have all these weird rites of passage that are deemed important and many are quite dysfunctional.

Robin later writes, “curiously absent from homeschoolers as a group is something many presumed to be a part of every childhood – youthful angst and alienation. The burning desire to isolate and separate themselves from their parents just doesn’t seem to be there, researchers say”. Home schooled college student Ben Kniaz “recalls fondly enjoying two-hour conversations with his father every night”, and he and home schooled college student Aletheia Price describe “close, honest relationships with their parents and siblings.” Robin writes, “[. . .] some experts say, the homeschoolers are proving to be better prepared for adulthood than their traditionally schooled peers”.

For a while home schooling was illegal in some states. Home schooling was, and is, seen by some people as the acts of “paranoid [. . .] right-wing religious fanatics that stunts children’s emotional growth”. Parents who believed, and acted on the belief, that the government had no right to force their children to be taught the way the government deemed the correct way, were criminals.
Finally, in the 80’s, a group of people fought the laws, and finally, in 1993, home schooling was legal in all 50 states. Home schooling quickly grew. According to the Home School Legal Defense Association (http://www.hslda.org/research/faq.asp#1), in the 2001-2002 school year the number of home schooled children were between 1.725 million and 2.185 million. This is not a negligible percentage of school-aged children. In a 2001 Time article (http://www.time.com/time/covers/1101 010827/cover.html), the authors put the numbers this way: “Even the largest estimates still put the home schooled at only 4% of the total K-12 population — but that would mean more kids learn at home than attend all the public schools in Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Montana, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming combined.” Of course, the numbers today are higher than they were when this article was written. According to that Time article, the numbers were around 850,000 in 1999, which was the last year studied when the article was written.

Articles and information about home schooling hit “home” for me, because not only I, but my six siblings and most of my cousins, have been home schooled our entire school-aged lives. The article mentioned the concern for home-schooled children about social skills. All throughout my life I have felt rather awkward in social situations, I never am sure if I said the wrong thing or what the right thing is to say, and I find it very difficult to engage in small talk. While home-schooling may be a factor, I think that the main factor is simply because I throughout my life I have shown signs of Asperger’s syndrome, which is related to autism. Many of my relatives also show signs of it, and two of my cousins have very bad autism. I think we all felt a shock when we went from home schooling to a college setting, but we quickly got used to it. My brother, sister and my home-schooled cousins are right around a 4.0 GPA; in fact my brother was on the president’s list for a while.

I think that home schooling actually prepares you for the real world better than public schooling. In a public school setting, you mostly socialize with children your own age, and most of the adults you are in contact with do not have the time to devote much personal attention to you because of the large number of children they are teaching. This is not only for teachers, but also for parents. The child is gone most of the day, and does not get much time with his/her family. I do not see how these things could possibly help a child mature. As Knowles said, “Where did we ever get the idea that 2,000 13-year-olds were the ideal people with which to socialize other 13-year-olds?” Our parents were able to devote as much personal time to us as we needed, and this made it fun and easy to learn. We also learned to love and respect our parents. I have heard many people say, “I can’t wait until I’m old enough to get away from home!” or “My parents are such idiots!” I personally cannot relate to those sentiments.

Our parents pushed us to succeed, but they did not push us too far. They were able to teach each of us at our own pace, and because they were our parents and knew us, they knew what method of teaching would benefit us best. This is another problem I see with public school. Kids are not grouped by their interests, their ways of learning, or their knowledge level. Groups are assigned by age. They are taught the exact same thing the exact same way at the exact same time. A very intelligent child may not learn well in a certain class because of the rigidity of the method of teaching, or the lack of freedom of thought, or the impersonality. Kids need positive personal attention when being taught, and they need some freedom. Children are not microphones into which you speak information.

School bullies are another problem. We hear about them all the time. Most people dismiss them as just a nuisance, and perhaps even helpful to mature a child. This is a big mistake. School bullies help lead to things like the Columbine shootings. Of course most children will not go this far, but being bullied will cause serious damage to the victim’s self-image, and depending on their character, they may alienate themselves from the world, they may lose the will to learn, or they themselves may turn to bullying to try to gain back their self-image. Often either the teachers will be told about it and do nothing about it, or the child will be afraid to tell for fear that the bully will hurt them even more. My father was badly bullied when he was in school by a gang of six kids who had been held back about two grades. His teachers knew about it yet never did a thing about it. He still carries pain from it. In the article, Ben Kniaz states, “people say you seen to experience it to deal with it later, but you can just miss out on it and deal with it when you’re more mature.” This makes perfect sense. The younger a child is, the easier it is for an event to affect the child, whether it is positive or negative. It is a good idea to keep a child away from things that will make him/her bitter, feel alienated, etc., so that he/she will develop a good, strong character, and when he/she is old enough to go out on his own, he/she will be mature enough to be able to take the new slings and arrows of life.

Link Posted: 8/18/2004 9:29:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 9:40:58 AM EST by Greenhorn]
Heck with it, here's another paper I wrote about a year ago. It was for an education class (the same class as the last paper), and it was to be an interview with someone with a different background than the writer (parylized, black, poor, rich, Asian, whatever). I chose to interview someone who went to public school.


For the cultural interview I interviewed a friend from MCF (Miami Christian Fellowship) who went to public school. I have had no experience with public school, having been home-schooled my entire life, so all I know about it is what I read, see in movies/TV, hear from occasional comments by friends, my parents, et cetera. Through this interview I was able to get a somewhat clearer idea of what public school is like. Of course everyone’s experience in public school will be different, but the information I gathered from the interview fits rather well with what seems to be the general public school experience.

My interviewee explained that public school gave her good opportunities for such things as sports and music, and she also enjoyed the social aspects, such as meeting new people and making friends. She said that most of her teachers were very good and helped her the best they could, and she felt that she received a good education. All in all she said that public school was, even with its ups and downs, a very good experience. However, she does see problems with public school. Some of the problems are merely necessities of the school system, but others show some of the weaknesses and errors of the way the current public school system is organized; rather large problems that theoretically could be fixed without altering the basic system much.

One of the first points made by my interviewee was that she did not like the fact that there was practically no one-on-one attention from the teachers. The teachers had so many kids to teach, sometimes 30 in one class, that they simply did not have enough time to do anything but teach the class as a whole. She felt that this can slows the learning process. This is, of course, not a problem with the teachers; they do the best they can with what they have.

She said that while she had a lot of free time during the summer, it was extremely lacking during the school season. She said that practically all of her time was taken up by school, homework, and practicing for the swim team, and she had little time to do anything else. When my siblings and I were home-schooled, we had plenty of free time even during the school season. We would often finish our work by noon, and have the rest of the day to have fun, and our education was equal, at the very least, to the education received in public schools.

Insults directed toward people who had a physical or mental problem, or a mere difference from the “norm”, were common in her school, though she said she saw very little actual physical bullying. She said that there seemed to be three classes of people: those who bully, those who are the popular targets for bullies, and those who try to stay out of the bullies’ radar by not associating with their targets, and not associating with the bullies either. Basically they try to avoid other people. This bullying and insulting, she said, seemed to peak around the 6th-8th grade level. While she was never the victim of actual physical bullying, she told me that there was one girl who was not even in her class who would take every opportunity to insult her with no provocation and no reason.

Growing up, we were never regular subjects of bullies. There were only a few sporadic instances. When I was younger, between the age of 4 and 10, we lived in an apartment complex. I was often picked on and was actually hurt a few times, such as the time when a kid, for no reason, threw a rather large piece of gravel at my forehead. My brother once had his head slammed into a concrete sidewalk by a much older kid, and suffered a concussion. But other than that, we did not have any real dealings with bullies. After those incidences we learned to avoid them, and we were able to, because there was no reason to go near them; while in school you are forced to encounter them every day.

My interviewee told me that it was common for a subject to be finished in class well before class time was over, and the students had to sit and do nothing until the time was up. The opposite was common also. For example, many times lab work would be unfinished when the class ran out of time, and they were not able to learn all of what they should have. This is one of the larger differences I see between public and home schooling. We never ran out of time, or wasted time, because we only had a list of what was to be done and no specific time for each subject. If we were having trouble with one subject, we would spend a longer period of time on it. If we finished something earlier than expected, we could immediately begin working on another subject with no downtime. Time was never wasted, and time was never lacking.

Around the middle of the interview, she warned me that she was about to get on her soapbox, and then she explained one of the main things that bothered her about school. She said that she often had to take proficiency tests to get to the next grade, and the school would teach her how to do well on it, but she would only be taught the answers, and would not be taught the actual information behind the answers. So when taking the test, she would merely be regurgitating miscellaneous specific facts that covered very little of the basic fields of knowledge the questions were in.

Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:06:13 AM EST
wow



Guess I have labored under a wrong "assumption" about home schooling.

Seems it is the way to go for some people , and is successful.
I thank those who instead of attacking me, educated me in my misconception's.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:12:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:

Originally Posted By cyanide:

Originally Posted By thedave1164:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............




Actually this is not the case in most instances, my children behave very well, and can converse with adults. They know what is right and what is wrong. They learn social skills from one another, they fuss and fight with one another, and then work it out.

I don't need to force societies ills on them to help them develop. Who needs to be raised in a system with wannabe gang bangers, sluts, rapists, thieves, and drug dealers? Since when is a teacher better qualified to raise my children than I?

Not attacking you cy, but yours is the common mantra of those that are against homeschooling.

As a sheriff, how many home schooled kids did you have to arrest?

I can not say it is not a question asked by an arresting Officer ??

I will not say all home schooled kids will fail in life , just the majority .



Oddly enough, studies show that homeschooled kids are more involved in life than their public school counerparts. They actively participate in civics and politics, and are much more conservative overall. So, where are you getting your information from?


And I sure am not attacking you either , it is just that when a child is home schooled he misses a lot of the "bad" stuff that comes with a public education, confrontations with bullies , conflicts -- these are all in themselves learning experiences -------- that help one latter in life, don't you think so ?



You are some completely out of touch with how homeschooling works that it's unbeleivable.

My daughter participates actively in soccer, girl scouts, church activities, and neighborhood play groups on a regular basis. She also participates in a local homeschool group where she interacts with other homeschooled children and their parents.

You say they won't deal with bullies? Last week my daughter was confronted by a bully on the playground, and she dealt with him apporpriately. So how exactly is my homeschooled child missing out on learning experiences? How are my wife and I being overprotective? And seeing as how she's five and already doing work on a 3rd grade level, how is it possible we could be neglecting her education?

You, sir, are ignorant.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...



I guess I was
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:29:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By blackrifle51:
How many of you home school your kids? do you find that the schools are hostile to the idea of home schooling?




We Home School. Our school district even had a home school liason. MD is surprisingly very home school friendly.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:32:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 10:34:17 AM EST by Forest]

Originally Posted By cyanide:
Home schooling = parents trying to protect their children from society, sad thing is they will grow up - leave the home and be totally unprepared for life , and fail in it.............



You are SO clueless about this issue it isn't even funny. Considering how many US presidents were home schooled at some point in their lives (even in the 20th century) your statment shows your ignorance.

Statement removed when I saw Cyanides comments later in the thread.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:35:52 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:
wow



Guess I have labored under a wrong "assumption" about home schooling.

Seems it is the way to go for some people , and is successful.
I thank those who instead of attacking me, educated me in my misconception's.



No problem cy, you are a good guy deep down inside
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:38:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 10:39:49 AM EST by Brisk322]

Originally Posted By thedave1164:

Originally Posted By cyanide:
wow



Guess I have labored under a wrong "assumption" about home schooling.

Seems it is the way to go for some people , and is successful.
I thank those who instead of attacking me, educated me in my misconception's.



No problem cy, you are a good guy deep down inside



Does this mean that the "good dog" finally beat the "mean evil dog"?
Edit to add: Always good to see someone gracefully concede a well-made point.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:40:42 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 6:07:58 PM EST by CSM]
I was home schooled, and the local Public Schools were anti-homeschool until they figured out if I took one class they got $3000 funding for their school.

Homeschool works for people who want to make it work and really care about their kids. For those who dont know me I am a Junior at Colorado School of Mines. This is one of the top engineering schools in the world and they love homeschoolers. Some of the professors say that homeschoolers have the most drive, are the brightest, and are still down to earth.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:45:26 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 10:52:28 AM EST
I have no problem with homeschooling. I'm sure homeschoolingdoes result in a better education.

However, I don't think that's the main thing. If parents care enough to homeschool a child, they obviously play a bigger role in the children's lives. I mean, Look at your typical public school kids. Parents dump them off at school. After school, the kids go off on their own to themall or whatever and fend for themselves.

I would guess that homeschooled kids have much more parental interaction. Better parenting. Instead of spendingquality time together plopped in front of the TV, they spend qualitytime together learning.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:04:14 AM EST
We Home School. A neighbor turned us into the School District for having school aged children at home. The School District, instead of calling us to find out the ages of our children, turned us into Child Protective Services. In Washington a school aged child is 8 years old and at the time my oldest was 7 years of age.

I would not educate a child any other way. We test the children every year and they always post excellent scores. People always wonder if they are developing socially. They are involved in neighborhood sports, art classes, volunteer programs and there are always more kids in my house on the weekend than my wife and I created.

This choice may not be for everyone but it sure works for us. Anyone with questions feel free to PM me.

MT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:08:18 AM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:
wow



Guess I have labored under a wrong "assumption" about home schooling.

Seems it is the way to go for some people , and is successful.
I thank those who instead of attacking me, educated me in my misconception's.

Cyanide, I may not always agree with you, but you have just earned my respect. (I'll even overlook the misplaced apostrophe this time )
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:39:24 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 11:41:26 AM EST by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By cyanide:
wow



Guess I have labored under a wrong "assumption" about home schooling.

Seems it is the way to go for some people , and is successful.
I thank those who instead of attacking me, educated me in my misconception's.



I'm glad to see my papers did more than just get me a good grade. Thanks for reading them (I'm assuming you did), and +1 on cat's post.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:42:12 AM EST
I was home schooled, don't do that to your kids trust me. Especially if you are trying to shelter them from the "real world"

BTW, i was only home schooled for 1 year.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:43:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 11:47:15 AM EST by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By mtechgunman:
I was home schooled, don't do that to your kids trust me. Especially if you are trying to shelter them from the "real world"

BTW, i was only home schooled for 1 year.





Oh brother, here we go again.

If you were only home-schooled for one year, you do not know enough about it to know what you are talking about. You are clearly speaking from emotion, since the facts are against you. Read my papers.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 11:50:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 11:52:40 AM EST by MT_Pockets]
Huh?

People home school to shelter their children....??? If people wanted to shelter their children they would send them to public schools so the children would not see what goes on in the day daily life of a real person.

MT
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 12:05:37 PM EST
What I often think about is, how can anyone think that parents who actually spend the energy to teach their own children, spend time with them, take the main role in the bringing up of their child, are "abnormal" and "trying to shelter the kids from life"? Since when are parents supposed to ship their kids off to a bunch of strangers all day every day and only see them in the evenings, likely in front of the tube?
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 1:07:04 PM EST
i have relatives that home school. those kids are smart..........and socially retarded. how sad.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 3:39:21 PM EST

Originally Posted By TomJefferson:
Not to be negative but public school just means public school + homeschool if you want a good kid.

The social aspects of public school has it's good points and really bad points but one thing it sure means is you have to be envolved and your child sharing what is happening. I sometimes feel I do as much undoing as they do doing.

I have little doubt as to the root cause of Colombine incidents.


Tj



I highly advise spending some time with large groups of young children before espousing the good points of public schools. I suggest this specifically in an urban area. I used to work in a day care, and many of the kids who came in good at the beginning of the summer ended up behaving exactly as the bad kids. Kids that would listen to verbal commands and act like civilized human beings would be as wild and crazed as any of our worst kids in no time. As someone I read once said, who in their right mind thinks the best way to socialize a small child is to put them with others small children?

I tend to not give psychology much praise these days, but there's been a lot of interesting work done in the are of peer attachment disorder that gives a lot of insight into the teenage angst and peer groups that most teenagers are a part of today. It is the rule for homeschoolers to never have this problem that their public schooled counterparts have. Again, part of the issue may be because of the close interaction between parents and children in a homeschool environment that leaves no room for alienation and isolation from their parents. All I know is that when I got into school, especially the upper grades, I cared less about my parents and more about my friends when it came to who I was as a person and what I stood for. While my parents could be a pain, the social stigma of not fitting in with my peers (who were ultimately immoral asshats) was much more frightening to me.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 3:40:41 PM EST

Originally Posted By cyanide:

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:

You, sir, are ignorant.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...



I guess I was



Please do not take offense. The only thing wrong with being ignorant is staying that way. I only ask that you rely on fact on this issue instead of feeling.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 4:52:50 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/18/2004 4:53:07 PM EST by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:
As someone I read once said, who in their right mind thinks the best way to socialize a small child is to put them with others small children?



Could it be this?

As Knowles said, “Where did we ever get the idea that 2,000 13-year-olds were the ideal people with which to socialize other 13-year-olds?”

(from my paper)
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 5:22:04 PM EST
I was homeschooled. It was and is great. You all ought to try it.
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 5:28:04 PM EST
I have heard that homeschooled children miss out on a lot of things, like football. I started my own team, and leauge. My team, was 7-0-0 last year. So I do not think I missed anything.
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top