Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/21/2005 6:50:48 PM EDT
As of right now, it's at 175 mph. Here's the latest forecast discussion:


Hurricane Rita Advisory Number 18

Statement as of 10:00 PM CDT on September 21, 2005

...Category five Rita continuing to strengthen over the central
Gulf of Mexico...


a Hurricane Watch remains in effect for the Gulf of Mexico coast
from Port Mansfield Texas to Cameron Louisiana. A Hurricane Warning
may be required for portions of the Hurricane Watch area Thursday
morning.


A tropical storm watch remains in effect on either side of the
Hurricane Watch area... from east of Cameron to Grand Isle
Louisiana... and from south of Port Mansfield to Brownsville Texas.


A tropical storm watch remains in effect for the northeastern coast
of Mexico from Rio San Fernando northward to the Rio Grande.


A Hurricane Watch means that hurricane conditions are possible
within the watch area...generally within 36 hours. A tropical storm
watch means that tropical storm conditions are possible within the
watch area...generally within 36 hours.


Interests in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico should monitor the
progress of potentially catastrophic Hurricane Rita.


For storm information specific to your area...including possible
inland watches and warnings...please monitor products issued
by your local weather office.


At 10 PM CDT...0300z...the center of Hurricane Rita was located near
latitude 24.6 north... longitude 87.2 west or about 570 miles...
915 km... east-southeast of Galveston Texas and about 670 miles...
1080 km...east-southeast of Corpus Christi Texas.


Rita is moving toward the west near 9 mph ...15 km/hr...and this
general motion at a slightly faster forward speed is expected
during the next 24 hours.


Maximum sustained winds are near 175 mph...280 km/hr...with higher
gusts. Rita is a potentially catastrophic category five hurricane on
the Saffir-Simpson scale. Some fluctuations in intensity are likely
during the next 24 hours.


Hurricane force winds extend outward up to 70 miles...110 km...
from the center...and tropical storm force winds extend outward up
to 185 miles...295 km.


The estimated minimum central pressure is 897 mb...26.49 inches.
This means Rita is the third most intense hurricane in terms of
pressure in the Atlantic Basin.


Tides are currently running near normal along the Mississippi and
Louisiana coasts in the areas affected by Katrina. Tides in those
areas will increase up to 3 to 4 feet and be accompanied by large
waves over the next 24 hours... and residents there could
experience some coastal flooding.

Heavy rains associated with Rita are forecast to begin to affect the
western and central Gulf of Mexico coastal areas Thursday night
into Friday. Rita is expected to produce total rainfall
accumulations of 8 to 12 inches with isolated maximum amounts of
15 inches over the central to Upper Texas coast. Rainfall amounts
of 2 to 24 inches will be possible across southern Louisiana...
including the New Orleans metropolitan area. After Rita moves
inland...total rain accumulations of 5 to 10 inches will be
possible over eastern Texas... and central and eastern Oklahoma
during Saturday and Sunday.


Repeating the 10 PM CDT position...24.6 N... 87.2 W. Movement
toward...west near 9 mph. Maximum sustained
winds...175 mph. Minimum central pressure... 897 mb.


An intermediate advisory will be issued by the National
Hurricane Center at 1 am CDT followed by the next
complete advisory at 4 am CDT.


Forecaster Stewart




$$



Folks, anyone considering "riding this out" should reconsider and un-ass the AO come morning.

-CH
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:51:58 PM EDT
Finally Camille gets a challenger.

We shall see- from about 300 miles away.

CRC
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:52:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:55:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=392037



BTW, I fully realize this could be viewed as a dupe topic of sorts. But there's several threads floating around already and I wanted to post this as new, rather specific info about the latest advisory, rather than having it buried in one of the other 3 or 4 page threads.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 6:55:55 PM EDT
Have hurricanes ever slammed into one another?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:05:32 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 7:07:05 PM EDT by Charging_Handle]

Originally Posted By falaholic1:
Have hurricanes ever slammed into one another?



The shear would just rip them both apart if that were possible.

It's possible for them to rotate around each other, but not merge.

But more often than not, one storm would be dominant, with the upper level flow of it weakening the lesser storm.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:07:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Charging_Handle:

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=392037



BTW, I fully realize this could be viewed as a dupe topic of sorts. But there's several threads floating around already and I wanted to post this as new, rather specific info about the latest advisory, rather than having it buried in one of the other 3 or 4 page threads.



I f**king hate the Dupe Police.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:08:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zer04evr:

Originally Posted By Charging_Handle:

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=392037



BTW, I fully realize this could be viewed as a dupe topic of sorts. But there's several threads floating around already and I wanted to post this as new, rather specific info about the latest advisory, rather than having it buried in one of the other 3 or 4 page threads.



I f**king hate the Dupe Police.



Me too. In my eyes, I hate them slightly less than Al Qaeda.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:10:04 PM EDT
Jim Cantore on TWC just made an interesting analogy. He says Rita is basically a powerful tornado the size of Georgia.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:11:45 PM EDT
The Gulf, Carib, and Southern North Atlantic give life to much of the country by offering up the humidity critical to our precipitation. Unfortunately, they also can turn a small cluster of thunderstorms into a monster.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:11:52 PM EDT
What is the record on sustained wind speed?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:12:46 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:16:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Charging_Handle:
Jim Cantore on TWC just made an interesting analogy. He says Rita is basically a powerful tornado the size of Georgia.



Jim lives for stuff like this.

One of these days he will do something reckless, like steal one of those really really big Airbuses and try to ram it right down a hurricane's throat, in a desperate, yet futile attempt to foil Mother Nature.

He will be viewed as a hero, something like the Alvin York of Meteorology, and elementary schools throughout the Gulf Coast will be named after him.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:21:16 PM EDT
Man its ripping up Grand Cayman right now. I hope the reefs are ok. The best diving I ever experienced. 150'+ visibility underwater.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:23:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zer04evr:

Originally Posted By Charging_Handle:

Originally Posted By FieroLoki:
www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=1&f=5&t=392037



BTW, I fully realize this could be viewed as a dupe topic of sorts. But there's several threads floating around already and I wanted to post this as new, rather specific info about the latest advisory, rather than having it buried in one of the other 3 or 4 page threads.



I f**king hate the Dupe Police.



He did it the right way and posted a link. He didnt come out and scream dupe and run like the retards do.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:23:36 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:
What is the record on sustained wind speed?



That would probably be either Camille or the 1935 Labor Day hurricane as far as max winds in the Atlantic basin. We're talking max sustained winds in the 190-200 mph range.

I'm not sure what some of the super typhoons in the Pacific have done, but I doubt there has ever been anything much over 200 mph as far as max winds.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:27:20 PM EDT
Fuck this shit! I went out & fueled up everything I own. Every small engine from generators to lawn mower is now full of fuel. Both BMW & F250 SD got filled as well. All fuel cans now full. Spent $155 but can travel 1,000 miles without purchase of more fuel! Even have fuel for my outboard motor!

I won't pay $5.00 a gallon!
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:29:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sniper1az:
Fuck this shit! I went out & fueled up everything I own. Every small engine from generators to lawn mower is now full of fuel. Both BMW & F250 SD got filled as well. All fuel cans now full. Spent $155 but can travel 1,000 miles without purchase of more fuel! Even have fuel for my outboard motor!

I won't pay $5.00 a gallon!



With 25% of the US gas refinining capability in the path, that might not be a dumb thing to do, although I usually frown on hoarding.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:31:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 7:33:31 PM EDT by 3rdStreet]


This infrared satellite image provided by NOAA and taken at 9:45 p.m. EDT Wednesday Sept. 21, 2005 shows Hurricane Rita over the Gulf of Mexico. Gaining strength with frightening speed, Rita swirled toward the Gulf Coast a Category 5, 165-mph monster Wednesday as more than 1.3 million people in Texas and Louisiana were sent packing on orders from authorities who learned a bitter lesson from Katrina. (AP Photo/NOAA) Email Photo Print Photo
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:33:05 PM EDT
Camille had winds up to 220 MPH reported when she hit.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:39:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CRC:
Camille had winds up to 220 MPH reported when she hit.




Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:41:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CRC:
Camille had winds up to 220 MPH reported when she hit.




Gusts or sustained?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:42:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Grunteled:

Originally Posted By CRC:
Camille had winds up to 220 MPH reported when she hit.




Gusts or sustained?



Gusts. Sustained, 180MPH.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:43:56 PM EDT
Gusts in the 220-230 class range.

The thing with Camille was it got strong over the gulf and STAYED THAT WAY.

There was no weakening with Camille until well inland.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:45:58 PM EDT
tag.
Thanks for the info. Got friends there. Good luck to all.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:46:10 PM EDT
Just an update....the NHC seems to be forecasting this thing to remain a Cat 5 through 48 hours. That means it would only have 12 hours or so to weaken below that level before making landfall. I'm afraid that even if it does weaken, the storm surge will still be Cat 5 level, as was the case with Katrina. A massive wall of water, once placed into motion, doesn't slow down quickly. So even if the winds are less, expect a massive storm surge and at mimimum, cat 4 level winds.
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 7:48:52 PM EDT
If it's Camille's twin Texas is screwed.

At least most of Texas isn't below sea level.

Link Posted: 9/21/2005 8:11:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/21/2005 8:12:16 PM EDT by Bag_Man]
Bring it on.......

Im in Austin, anyone think I should bug out?
Link Posted: 9/21/2005 8:32:17 PM EDT
"Houston, we have a problem."

It looks like Houston/Galvaston is right in its path according to Houston Chron projection.
images.chron.com/content/news/photos/05/09/21/pathmap/ritapathmap.jpg
Top Top