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Posted: 12/3/2018 10:04:16 AM EST
I had to shoot a birthday shindig over the weekend. I am not one to push my d500 over an iso of 1600 and feel comfortable. This gig had me running 2000-4000 all night. I have watched youtube tutorials and read a few things to try but I either see no change or the overall product comes out horrible no matter how I look at it.

Are there any great resources out there that could point me in the right direction? Is either one of the PS or LR better than the other in this certain aspect? All help is immensely appreciated.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 10:22:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/3/2018 10:23:39 AM EST by Zack3g]
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 10:34:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/3/2018 10:35:01 AM EST by doc_Zox]
tripod and fast glass

if I am being paid to grip and grin an event, then the bounced synced flash on a remote is getting a work out
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 11:02:48 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Zack3g:
There's not much that'll help after you shoot.

"I won't run x camera over y iso" is basically the worst possible way to handle it.

I can shoot an image at 25,600 on the same exact camera and it'll be print worthy with little noticeable noise.

ETTR, man. That's what it excels at, improving the signal to noise ratio to help reduce noise. It works at low ISO, it works at high ISO.

ISO 12,800

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1859/44503931272_ca1a491b2f_b.jpg_DSC3297 by Zack, on Flickr

ISO 20,000

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1856/43644043865_3c900d2412_b.jpg_DSC3300 by Zack, on Flickr

This is *WITHOUT* any noise reduction beyond the lightroom import/export defaults.

Is there some background noise, sure there is. It'd still look good printed even without it, and this is a worst case scenario. Bright subject, dark background, shitty midtones...a noise nightmare.

Shot was done with ETTR.

If I was to perform noise reduction following the below steps, you'd hardly see any at all. NEVER do subject noise reduction, and NEVER do noise reduction in highs or upper midtones, keep it to the shadows.

Tips on noise reduction - duplicate your layer in PS - do the most heavy handed noise reduction filter you have on the upper layer. Turn it to mush, seriously.

Then, what you'll do is use blend if to only apply it to the shadow region, and use layer transparency to help feather it in a bit.

You can also use a color fill layer that's linked to the blend if to show you where it's being applied.
View Quote
So you find that, let’s say, raising ISO in order to overexpose by 1 stop produces less noise than just shooting at 1 stop lower ISO?
(Eg shoot 1 stop over at 25,600 vs just shooting at 12,800)

For the OP, I know this probably doesn’t help too much, but I use the DXO PhotoLab (formerly OpticsPro) prime noise reduction for high ISO shots.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 11:14:56 AM EST
Thanks for all the info thus far. It was a last minute, grab the case and run out the door thing. One thing I did learn, is there is no sync port on a sb700. I would have loved to have used it off camera, but without that, my pocket wizards were pretty much useless. I typically rent an elinchrom set up when I do any sort of event, as they're quite handy.

Most of the indoor stuff is ok with the LR adjustment. It's when I get to the outdoor stuff, that makes me want to throw the laptop through the window. I reckon worst comes to worst, I can reduce the noise enough for them to work in a black and white setting.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 11:21:14 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 9:22:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/3/2018 9:26:33 PM EST by FredMan]
Until you get into serious cropping the noise on the D500 is manageable in post, up to around 20,000 or so. (Think I'll go do an example in the post thread. Huh. Looks like I already did. But look at the before/after strictly from a noise standpoint.)

I rarely get above 1000, but will go to whatever if it really needs it.

But if your goal is ETTR, ISO is the worst thing you can use. Always go with shutter or aperture first.
Link Posted: 12/3/2018 11:51:42 PM EST
Originally Posted By clweathers:
I had to shoot a birthday shindig over the weekend. I am not one to push my d500 over an iso of 1600 and feel comfortable. This gig had me running 2000-4000 all night. I have watched youtube tutorials and read a few things to try but I either see no change or the overall product comes out horrible no matter how I look at it.

Are there any great resources out there that could point me in the right direction? Is either one of the PS or LR better than the other in this certain aspect? All help is immensely appreciated.
View Quote
We need some definition on "comes out horrible".

How much noise reduction you need depends on what your final picture will be used for.

If you are making prints, the visual resolution reduction of the printing process will naturally eat much of the noise.
Ditto for reducing the size of the photo to be seen via the web.
Keep in mind that no one will see your image at 100% zoom.

The most noise reduction I have ever used is about 35 on the Lightroom slider for 1-stop underexposed, brightened in post, at ISO 6400 (max numbered ISO of my Nikon D700).
Link Posted: 12/4/2018 12:25:41 PM EST
I do think I was worried about nothing. I am able to get a handle on it enough I believe. Seems like a lapse in my technique, as I'm usually spot on, especially with event stuff. I'm also used to working with decent usable light, not dark backyards
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