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Posted: 3/12/2005 8:57:00 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:58:53 PM EDT
No. Never saw a need.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:59:09 PM EDT
Heavy Metal
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:59:33 PM EDT
Paint chips are good
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 8:59:36 PM EDT
My lead level is fine, just topped up today.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:01:12 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:03:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wave:
you guys that shoot ALOT should consider it. I do the majority of my shooting outdoors(good ventilation) and my FEP level is elevated.



Explain this FEP level. If it gets too high, can you take a break from shooting until it goes back down? Does it take a while? What the hell is your FEP level and what affects it?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:04:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:05:29 PM EDT
our range got shut down for a while cause some guy had "elevated" levels of lead in his blood.

Solution: STOP SHOOTING!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:06:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TheFreepster:
our range got shut down for a while cause some guy had "elevated" levels of lead in his blood.

Solution: STOP SHOOTING!!!!!



Solution: STOP EATING LEAD PAINT!!!!!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:08:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wave:
I'm not sure what FEP is either...

Dammit Jim, I'm a cop not a doctor!


You know the more lead in yeah the more likely you will survive a nuclear war

So stop your bitching and start eating some of these paint chips I got.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:14:22 PM EDT
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:14:36 PM EDT
in reference to some of your posts, and mine above, IIRC lead is considered a heavy metal in that it persists in the body.

What this means is that the levels that are there will stay for some time.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:25:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 9:28:30 PM EDT by NH_AR_Shooter]

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



He need not have gotten it from shooting, if he did it would have been due to airborn lead particals, dust. Mostly this is only a concern with indoor ranges.

One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becoming shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:27:13 PM EDT
I don't want to know.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:27:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:29:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 9:30:20 PM EDT by Wave]
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:31:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.



When you shoot at an in door range, lead bullets will create lead dust, if the ventilation is poor, you end up breathing it. Simply shooting, handling lead bullets, esp outdoors is totaly safe.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:31:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.




Lead from shooting can come from vaporization at the base of the bullet as well as from primers. So yes, there certainly is lead "dust" in the air when you shoot.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:32:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.



When you shoot at an in door range, lead bullets will create lead dust, if the ventilation is poor, you end up breathing it. Simply shooting, handling lead bullets, esp outdoors is totaly safe.



OK, got it. Whew! I'm cool!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:39:22 PM EDT
What do you consider a lot of shooting
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:52:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.



When you shoot at an in door range, lead bullets will create lead dust, if the ventilation is poor, you end up breathing it. Simply shooting, handling lead bullets, esp outdoors is totaly safe.



OK, got it. Whew! I'm cool!




Not exactly. Handling ANY lead puts you at risk, if safety precautions are not taken.

Lead on the hands (reloading, etc.) can very easily be transmitted to your mouth, nose, eyes, etc and absorbed by the blood stream. If you're handling lead, you should ALWAYS wear gloves, and wash your hands ASAP.

Also, you can be exposed via other ways you would NEVER expect.

Crystal glassware....... Good crystal is made with lead. Using lead-crystal to drink from (ie. wine glasses, etc) CAN cause the lead to leech slowly from the crystal over time, and be absorbed by YOU.

Old crystal liquor decanters are notorious for this. When fluids are left to sit in them, such as brandy, cognac, etc, they can absorb the leeched lead from the bottle, and of course you drink that, along with the booze.

Also infamous are many older ceramic glazes used in pottery or dishware.

If you have old china (hand me downs, etc) they may very well have been glazed with lead bearing glazes... Same thing happens over time as with the crystal mentioned above.

There are commercially available test kits you can get, to test your things at home. They are simple to use and not very expensive, considering.....


The problem with lead is it takes SO long for your body to eliminate it itself, it's essentially a moot point. Lead will stay in your system for a LONG TIME........ decades.....

There are drugs called chelating agents that are injected intramuscularly or via an IV drip, that 'grab hold' of the lead molecules in your tissues and allow your body to excrete them. This works relatively well, but can be an unpleasant experience as it takes some time, and many injections, to my knowledge. The side effects can suck as well.

Lead can do some very serious damage, if left unchecked, including causing brain damage, coma and/or even death.

Really isn't hard to put on a lousy pair of latex gloves when reloading, etc.

That small effort CAN save you a load of misery down the road.





Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:54:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 10:04:04 PM EDT by sherm8404]
Ray eats paint chips.

It's true.

He always has some out in a bowl like chips whenever I visit. And a variety of dips.



I only get tested for TB, but that's because I work around sick people all day, not guns.

I wish I worked around guns all day.


<sniff>

ETA...

I have no clue what it means but....

FEP = free erythrocyte protoporphyrin (FEP)

Erythrocytes are red blood cells.

Protoporphyrin is a hemoglobin derivative that has 4 pyrrole nuclei.

I guess if it is elevated, it may be a response to lead.

I dunno, i just have a Taber's Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary and i'm doing A&P homework.

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:56:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JB69:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.



When you shoot at an in door range, lead bullets will create lead dust, if the ventilation is poor, you end up breathing it. Simply shooting, handling lead bullets, esp outdoors is totaly safe.



OK, got it. Whew! I'm cool!




Not exactly. Handling ANY lead puts you at risk, if safety precautions are not taken.

Lead on the hands (reloading, etc.) can very easily be transmitted to your mouth, nose, eyes, etc and absorbed by the blood stream. If you're handling lead, you should ALWAYS wear gloves, and wash your hands ASAP.

Also, you can be exposed via other ways you would NEVER expect.

Crystal glassware....... Good crystal is made with lead. Using lead-crystal to drink from (ie. wine glasses, etc) CAN cause the lead to leech slowly from the crystal over time, and be absorbed by YOU.

Old crystal liquor decanters are notorious for this. When fluids are left to sit in them, such as brandy, cognac, etc, they can absorb the leeched lead from the bottle, and of course you drink that, along with the booze.

Also infamous are many older ceramic glazes used in pottery or dishware.

If you have old china (hand me downs, etc) they may very well have been glazed with lead bearing glazes... Same thing happens over time as with the crystal mentioned above.

There are commercially available test kits you can get, to test your things at home. They are simple to use and not very expensive, considering.....


The problem with lead is it takes SO long for your body to eliminate it itself, it's essentially a moot point. Lead will stay in your system for a LONG TIME........ decades.....

There are drugs called chelating agents that are injected intramuscularly or via an IV drip, that 'grab hold' of the lead molecules in your tissues and allow your body to excrete them. This works relatively well, but can be an unpleasant experience as it takes some time, and many injections, to my knowledge. The side effects can suck as well.

Lead can do some very serious damage, if left unchecked, including causing brain damage, coma and/or even death.

Really isn't hard to put on a lousy pair of latex gloves when reloading, etc.

That small effort CAN save you a load of misery down the road.








Thanks for the info. I don't reload, and I shoot jacketed rounds. I don't own any crystal. My dishes (Phaltzgraf) are new. I'm feeling pretty good. All of a sudden I'm curious as to what my levels are, though. I'm sure I'm fine!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:58:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By svi40:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



One way that is common, is people will sand down the old paint in their homes, window frames, door trim ect, this old paint often has lead in it. The airborn dust from sanding can give you lead poisoning.

One thing is though, only in the most extreme case's are there any obvious symtoms.

In the late 1800s, there were some artic explorers who relied heavily on canned food after becomeing shipwrecked, the cans had been sealed with lead, many of them became ill, insane, and finaly died. Archaeologist recently exhumed the dead explorers, the lead levels found in the bodies were off the scale.



OK, so you can inhale lead particles. What about shooting, though? I'm still puzzled. I can't imagine that there's lead dust flying around while I'm shooting. I could be wrong.




Lead from shooting can come from vaporization at the base of the bullet as well as from primers. So yes, there certainly is lead "dust" in the air when you shoot.



What if you only shoot on windy days?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 9:58:57 PM EDT
How often would you have to shoot/handle rounds before this becomes a problem? To be honest, I almost never wash my hands after shooting/handling rounds.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:06:56 PM EDT
Oh, and last time I had breakfast with Ray, he had a big bowl if .22 cal rounds. I guess almost an entire brick of Remington Yellowjackets.


Don't worry. He was smart about it, he had it with 2%, not whole milk.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:07:20 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:

What if you only shoot on windy days?



Don't wear a skirt?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:08:19 PM EDT
I eat lead for breakfast!
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:09:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By svi40:

Originally Posted By CZ75_9MM:

What if you only shoot on windy days?



Don't wear a skirt?




Make sure you're upwind?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:11:47 PM EDT
Looks like I am going to have to invest in latex gloves for loading magazines
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:13:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dpmmn:
Looks like I am going to have to invest in latex gloves for loading magazines



Just don't lick your rounds as you load.


You should be fine.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:14:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 10:16:52 PM EDT by Andreuha]
I thought the main problems were caused by shooting lead ammo (ie: lead bullets, not copper-jacketed ones) in poorly ventilated areas.


Edit to add: Oh well, I guess I'll have to get tested for that, too, next time I see a doctor.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:18:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SubnetMask:
So how do you get lead poisoning from shooting? Is it from simply handling bullets? Can lead be introduced into your system through your skin? Is it introduced by handling food with your lead-tainted hands? What if you primarily shoot jacketed rounds?

This confuses me. Is there a doctor in the house?



The primary method for ingestion by adults is inhalation, followed distantly by absorption through the skin and handling food with contaminated hands. Most adults do not absorb most of the lead introduced into their digestive system, unlike children.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:19:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Andreuha:
I thought the main problems were caused by shooting lead ammo (ie: lead bullets, not copper-jacketed ones) in poorly ventilated areas.


Edit to add: Oh well, I guess I'll have to get tested for that, too, next time I see a doctor.



Most jacketed bullets still have an exposed base that can have some degree of vaporization.

True it probably isn't nearly as bad as a lead though.

Then there is the lead based primer thing... can anyone confirm this?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:19:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JB69:


Not exactly. Handling ANY lead puts you at risk, if safety precautions are not taken.

Lead on the hands (reloading, etc.) can very easily be transmitted to your mouth, nose, eyes, etc and absorbed by the blood stream. If you're handling lead, you should ALWAYS wear gloves, and wash your hands ASAP.

Also, you can be exposed via other ways you would NEVER expect.

Crystal glassware....... Good crystal is made with lead. Using lead-crystal to drink from (ie. wine glasses, etc) CAN cause the lead to leech slowly from the crystal over time, and be absorbed by YOU.

Old crystal liquor decanters are notorious for this. When fluids are left to sit in them, such as brandy, cognac, etc, they can absorb the leeched lead from the bottle, and of course you drink that, along with the booze.

Also infamous are many older ceramic glazes used in pottery or dishware.

If you have old china (hand me downs, etc) they may very well have been glazed with lead bearing glazes... Same thing happens over time as with the crystal mentioned above.

There are commercially available test kits you can get, to test your things at home. They are simple to use and not very expensive, considering.....


The problem with lead is it takes SO long for your body to eliminate it itself, it's essentially a moot point. Lead will stay in your system for a LONG TIME........ decades.....

There are drugs called chelating agents that are injected intramuscularly or via an IV drip, that 'grab hold' of the lead molecules in your tissues and allow your body to excrete them. This works relatively well, but can be an unpleasant experience as it takes some time, and many injections, to my knowledge. The side effects can suck as well.

Lead can do some very serious damage, if left unchecked, including causing brain damage, coma and/or even death.

Really isn't hard to put on a lousy pair of latex gloves when reloading, etc.

That small effort CAN save you a load of misery down the road.








The levels of lead that you refer to above, from touching lead, lead crystal are insignificant. Lead poisoning requires repeated and prolonged heavy exposure.

Having composed and taught a certified course on lead contamination, I can tell you the levels needed to be a problem can not be acheived by by handling old china, glass or even lead paint chips. You must injest it, by eating or by breathing it to reach toxic levels. And it has been demonstrated in effected children that lead will eventually leave your system once exposure ends.

So dont go through life worried about lead, dont eat it, dont breath it, you'll be fine.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:22:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 10:22:41 PM EDT by svi40]
Just a side thought,...

I wonder what the chances of the anti's getting to the EPA would be.

If it could get to the point that they ban all lead based ammunition, eventually causing it to be so damned expensive you couldn't afford to shoot.

Do i need to invest in a bullet caster?
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:25:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By JB69:
Not exactly. Handling ANY lead puts you at risk, if safety precautions are not taken.

Lead on the hands (reloading, etc.) can very easily be transmitted to your mouth, nose, eyes, etc and absorbed by the blood stream. If you're handling lead, you should ALWAYS wear gloves, and wash your hands ASAP.

Also, you can be exposed via other ways you would NEVER expect.



How about plastic miniblinds made in China with lead additives? It's very common to find these, and according to the worker form the county health department, one of the leading causes of lead poisoning in adults and children because no one ever suspects them.

For shooters, cleaning your gun with petroleum based solvents and oils is a fast track way to absorb lead and other nastiness left over from shooting directly into your blood stream. I wear nitrile gloves when cleaning my guns for exactly that reason.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:26:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By svi40:
Just a side thought,...

I wonder what the chances of the anti's getting to the EPA would be.

If it could get to the point that they ban all lead based ammunition, eventually causing it to be so damned expensive you couldn't afford to shoot.

Do i need to invest in a bullet caster?



It has already happened with the military, "green bullets" with some sort of ceramic core, its only a matter of time till they start regulating civilain ammo.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:27:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Wave:
Fun at work! I have to get it done every 6 months!

I recently got my blood tested for lead and free erythrocyte protoporphyrin(FEP) levels.


A blood level of 25 micrograms/deciliter of blood(ug/dl) or above is considered elevated by New York State Dept. of Health guidelines and the New York City Dept. of Health...



An FEP level of 35 or above may be due to lead exposure or other medical conditions and you should be examined by a private physician...


Looks like I "passed" this time:

Lead - 5 ug/dl
FEP - 34 ug/dl




Actually, the figure I've heard tossed around is 10ug/dl being when they consider your lead levels elevated, not 25. Still, you're well under that. Never heard of FEP.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:30:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By svi40:

Originally Posted By Andreuha:
I thought the main problems were caused by shooting lead ammo (ie: lead bullets, not copper-jacketed ones) in poorly ventilated areas.


Edit to add: Oh well, I guess I'll have to get tested for that, too, next time I see a doctor.



Most jacketed bullets still have an exposed base that can have some degree of vaporization.

True it probably isn't nearly as bad as a lead though.

Then there is the lead based primer thing... can anyone confirm this?



Traditional primers are mercury based, not lead.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:30:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:


How about plastic miniblinds made in China with lead additives? It's very common to find these, and according to the worker form the county health department, one of the leading causes of lead poisoning in adults and children because no one ever suspects them.

For shooters, cleaning your gun with petroleum based solvents and oils is a fast track way to absorb lead and other nastiness left over from shooting directly into your blood stream. I wear nitrile gloves when cleaning my guns for exactly that reason.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...



It is the dust from cleaning these that gets air born, as well as getting on hands, and then in your mouth.

You should never get petroleum based products on your skin, lead is a minor concern compared to what solvents can do to you.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:34:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 10:35:49 PM EDT by svi40]

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:

Traditional primers are mercury based, not lead.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...



Found something

While the lead content in primers is an undisputed health hazard, it is also an important part of the priming compound. Lead holds the other chemicals responsible for the controlled explosion of the primer together. This tiny, high explosive charge housed in the base of the cartridge is an effective, efficient initiator which sets off the powder in the cartridge case, launching the bullet down the barrel to the target. As the primer explodes, lead and other elements are released in the form of toxic gases into the atmosphere.

LINK


ETA - This seems to be a pretty good writeup about lead hazards and shooting.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:38:11 PM EDT
Where lead is concerned, quantity and repeat exposure are the problem, the amount of lead in primers is insignifigant. It really takes a lot of lead and prolonged exposure to create toxic levels.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:41:59 PM EDT
NH-AR-Shooter,

Just curious, what the deal with the lead contamination course you taught? What was it for?

Sounds cool.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 10:49:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By svi40:

Originally Posted By GodBlessTexas:

Traditional primers are mercury based, not lead.

Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...



Found something

While the lead content in primers is an undisputed health hazard, it is also an important part of the priming compound. Lead holds the other chemicals responsible for the controlled explosion of the primer together. This tiny, high explosive charge housed in the base of the cartridge is an effective, efficient initiator which sets off the powder in the cartridge case, launching the bullet down the barrel to the target. As the primer explodes, lead and other elements are released in the form of toxic gases into the atmosphere.

LINK


ETA - This seems to be a pretty good writeup about lead hazards and shooting.



The EPA tends to go to extremes once they declare something "toxic" they adopt almost a zero tolerance policy regarding exposure, often ignoring real world health risk assessments.

Such articles must be read with a certain amount of scepticism.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 11:01:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/12/2005 11:07:21 PM EDT by Helldog40]
Hey guys,

Don't sweat the bullets... I routinely work around lead paint and get tested regularly. I'm also certified to teach Lead Hazard Awareness.

First off, the tests Wave is talking about only measures the amount of FREE lead currently circulating in the blood, i.e. exposure in the last 60 days or so. After that, excess lead not excreted will, like ALL heavy metals, lodge in the bone marrow.

This is not a problem at low levels, though there is some concern that long-term low-level exposure may accumulate enough to cause osteodenisty problems later as the lead displaces lighter metals like calcium. The jury is still out on this.

Anyways, lead poses very little risk for topical contact, the greater hazards are inhalation and ingestion of fine particles as NH_AR_Shooter already pointed out. Unless you spend several hours a day in unventilated indoor ranges, airborne lead should not pose a problem. Just stop chewing on fishing sinkers and eating paint chips.

Don't worry about Ray, he was dain bramaged years ago and is just trying to blame it on lead.

Link Posted: 3/12/2005 11:04:45 PM EDT
Very good info here, I know chelating agents work very well in fish when exposed to heavy metals. The indoor ranges around here require that you buy their ammo. I am in electronics and am exposed to solder all the time (mostly lead) and washing hands is critical to lowering exposure. I also have separated my ammo for indoor range and outdoor range uses. Read the boxes and make sure it's 360 degree full metal jacketed. Hence the ranges requiring we buy their ammo. Some ammo has the lead ball exposed at the rear and when fired it burns some of the lead.
Link Posted: 3/12/2005 11:06:57 PM EDT
Not much lead in my blood but according to the wife, there's plenty of lead in my pencil.
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 2:34:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:
The EPA tends to go to extremes once they declare something "toxic" they adopt almost a zero tolerance policy regarding exposure, often ignoring real world health risk assessments.

Such articles must be read with a certain amount of scepticism.




It's my understanding that when lead is exposed to the air it forms a protective oxide that effectively seals it. That's why handling it isn't much of a problem and why noone is calling for ranges to be declared hazard zones.
Link Posted: 3/13/2005 2:41:52 AM EDT
Relax fellers, we will all die of cancer long before the lead kill us.
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