Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 3/19/2006 8:16:19 PM EDT
i am wanting to reload ammo and have been wanting to for the last 3 years, i just mnever got into it (addicted to buying out wal-marts WWB ammo hahaha)

heelp me decide a few things
im looking t get into it with reliable equipment but most importantly i want to have a blend of easy to use, but fast equipment

i was not really wanting a single stage press, but i guess all i can say is i want a set-up where is can sit and reload all kinds of ammo for plinking and general use, and i also want to use the same press for more advanced and target loads,

i will be reloading pistol and small and big bore rifles,

any suggestions or thoughts
ALSO LIST THE CONTENTS IN WHICH I SHOULD BUY
PRESS
CASE TRIMMER
ECT ECT
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:18:15 PM EDT
Dillon

Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:18:32 PM EDT
Dillon
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:19:59 PM EDT
Dillon 650
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:22:23 PM EDT
Go to Dillon Precisions website and compare them all. I owned the Square Deal and it was fantastic.

HH
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:23:46 PM EDT
Well, if you want a progressive I figure Dillon is probably your best bet..


I have a couple of case trimmers, AN RCBS and a Forster. I use both rarely. But good to have, as cases do need to be trimmed from time to time, it's easy to fuckup your cases though so be careful.

Dies, RCBS, Redding or Hornady's are all good.

Scale, Digitals are popular, I use an RCBS 1010 that my dad bought 25 years ago that weighs out charges just as sccurate as a digital.

Case prep you probably want to get a tumbler, there's a bunch on the market, just dont go and buy the media from the manufacturer or the local gun shop. You can get fine crushed walnut at the local pet shop for a couple bucks vs $10/lb the gunshop charges.

If you need a powder thrower I would invest in one of the automatic ones that trickle a charge out onto a digital scale and stop at a preset weight. Although I still hand trickle all my taget and ground hog stuff.

Thats all I can think of for the major componants.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:29:45 PM EDT
I am picking up my first press this week - a Dillon 550B with strong mount
I haven't decided on a case trimmer yet.
I am probably going to use Redding dies
I am definitely getting a Lee factory crimp die
I am going to use the chemical cleaners for brass instead of tumbling
I am probably going to build my own bench.

I am sure I am forgetting things, but that is my basic list.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:46:39 PM EDT
DILLON
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 8:58:44 PM EDT
DILLON!
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 9:08:04 PM EDT
I'll be different, and say Dillon.

Seriously, don't drink the blue-cool aid without looking at the Hornady LockNLoad AP. It's as automated as the Dillon 650, yet cheaper than the 550, and better yet the shell plates are cheaper and switching calibers is faster, cheaper and easier than Dillon. It's built like a tank and Hornady has excellent customer service, just like Dillon.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 9:14:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:
I'll be different, and say Dillon.

Seriously, don't drink the blue-cool aid without looking at the Hornady LockNLoad AP. It's as automated as the Dillon 650, yet cheaper than the 550, and better yet the shell plates are cheaper and switching calibers is faster, cheaper and easier than Dillon. It's built like a tank and Hornady has excellent customer service, just like Dillon.



I'll second checking out the Hornady. Hornady makes good stuff. I ended up with the Dillon cause I wanted the case feeder. The Hornady L-n-L now has a similar case feeder.

Link Posted: 3/19/2006 9:27:25 PM EDT
As others have stated, I shall reiterate, Dillon. I have been running two 1050's and a SL900 and they work great.

For precision LRL, I use RCBS.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 9:29:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Weiseguy:

Originally Posted By swingset:
I'll be different, and say Dillon.

Seriously, don't drink the blue-cool aid without looking at the Hornady LockNLoad AP. It's as automated as the Dillon 650, yet cheaper than the 550, and better yet the shell plates are cheaper and switching calibers is faster, cheaper and easier than Dillon. It's built like a tank and Hornady has excellent customer service, just like Dillon.



I'll second checking out the Hornady. Hornady makes good stuff. I ended up with the Dillon cause I wanted the case feeder. The Hornady L-n-L now has a similar case feeder.




Yep. Nothing wrong with hornady. Still the only dies I will use.

I used to run a Lee press, which was actually pretty nice. It wasnt a progressive loader, but it worked well for me for a couple of years.
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 9:39:45 PM EDT
Beware!!!




____________________________________
The only hope you have is to accept the fact that you are already dead. And the sooner you accept that, the sooner you will be able to function as a soldier is supposed to function, without mercy, without compassion, without remorse.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 2:59:19 AM EDT
Check out the Reloading Forum and the FAQ tacked at the top. You can get most of your questions answered there.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:13:36 AM EDT
Dillon 550. It is simple, bullet and beginner-proof, and accepts dies from ANY manufacturer.

Dillon Square Deal is a good press, but only accepts Dillon proprietary dies which are also good, but spendy, and somewhat limited in caliber availability.

.45ACP is a good beginner reloading caliber.

Don't start off with a progressive. You need to see every single thing at every stage of the process for awhile. Develop some skill, then move up. If you have a 550, you'll almost certainly decide you have everthing you'll ever need.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:18:07 AM EDT
I want a 550, but my wallet is telling me to stick with my old Lee single stage.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:20:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Brians_45:
I am picking up my first press this week - a Dillon 550B with strong mount
I haven't decided on a case trimmer yet.
I am probably going to use Redding dies
I am definitely getting a Lee factory crimp die
I am going to use the chemical cleaners for brass instead of tumbling
I am probably going to build my own bench.

I am sure I am forgetting things, but that is my basic list.



Get a Forster...or I could sell you my Redding POS.

Link Posted: 3/20/2006 3:50:32 AM EDT
DILL...Er,wait.

Lee is cheap enough to see how you like/manage reloading,and it'll get the job done.It's all I've used for 25 + years,but I don't need to crank out 1,000 rounds in an evening.Cheap enough that I've got a few setup at any one time,so I don't have to fool around with things much.But some day...DILLION!
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:11:36 AM EDT
+1 Bazillion on the Dillon..
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:32:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 4:36:06 AM EDT by pv74]

Originally Posted By DaveS:

Originally Posted By Brians_45:
I am picking up my first press this week - a Dillon 550B with strong mount
I haven't decided on a case trimmer yet.
I am probably going to use Redding dies
I am definitely getting a Lee factory crimp die
I am going to use the chemical cleaners for brass instead of tumbling
I am probably going to build my own bench.

I am sure I am forgetting things, but that is my basic list.



Get a Forster...or I could sell you my Redding POS.

www.midwayusa.com/mediasvr.dll/image?saleitemid=614276



Start out with a basic one...then...

Get a Gracey or even better a Giraud...

www.giraudtool.com/

www.precisionreloading.com/graceytrimmer.htm


These case trimmers, while a bit pricey, work like an electric pencil sharpener.
Full lenght size the cases (it only works with full lenght sized cases, which you will be using in a semi auto rifle), and then run through the machine... I can do several hundred cases an hour with my Gracey trimmer. I have inserts for .308, .30-06, and .223...

Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:33:40 AM EDT
1. Get a single stage press for starters. You'll learn much more quickly and you'll always need a good single stage press for odd jobs, small lots.
2. After that, get a Dillon. My XL650 has been cranking them out since 1993. Outstanding engineering and support.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:54:28 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/20/2006 5:12:59 AM EDT by pv74]

Originally Posted By swingset:
I'll be different, and say Dillon.

Seriously, don't drink the blue-cool aid without looking at the Hornady LockNLoad AP. It's as automated as the Dillon 650, yet cheaper than the 550, and better yet the shell plates are cheaper and switching calibers is faster, cheaper and easier than Dillon. It's built like a tank and Hornady has excellent customer service, just like Dillon.




Yes, I have a LNL AP with a case feeder. The LNL AP is a lot better than when it first came out (I retrofitted mine for the new primer feed and case feeder)... It is very well made (built like a brick shithouse), and I have recieved excelent support from Hornady.

I have had my issues with the LNL AP, but I have managed to get it working quite nicely.

That said...

If I had to do it over again...I would get the Dillon. After trying a friend's 550B, I came to this opinion. It is very simple to operate, and works very, very smoothly... It is a great little press for the money. It may be a bit slower than an auto indexing press such as the LNL AP, but speed is not everything. You want quality, and uniformity above all.

I say get a Dillon..it is well worth the money and if you really want to get rid of it, you can sell it for almost what you paid for it. Just go on Ebay and take a look.

Your best bet, buy it straight from Dillon as you will be hard pressed to find a discount on one...

Whatever press you get..sit down and read the manual...take your time setting it up...
and follow all of the instructions in the loading manuals. Reloading is a very safe and rewarding hobby, but at times, it is not forgiving. The cautions in the manuals are their for a reason

As you gain experience over time, you will develop a sense of what to do and what not do.

As for me, I can honestly say that I have never had a problem with my reloads

Lets see...

More stuff you will want to consider...

You will find that you want a quick way to fill the primer tubes on your press...


Midway's Primer tube loader AKA "Vibraprime" is just the ticket...

Take off the plastic tube holder and just hold the metal tube up to the loader to get this thing to work...beats paying several hundred for the comparable Dillon product...

www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=656090


Oh and buy a nice digital scale... The ballance beams are very accurate, but will slow you down a bit.

Link Posted: 3/20/2006 7:31:24 AM EDT
OK YOU GUYS REALLY HELPED ME OUT, I REALLY LIKE THE lOCK-N-load BY HORNADY WITHT HE AUTO CASE FEED, AND EVERYTHING,

if i did go witht he dillion 550 or such, or the Lock-N-Load i could crank out the rounds, when wanting bulk, but can also use it like a single stage press right and do one at a time correct?

thanks guys i am gonna have to deside now,

i want the cillion 550, or the Hornady lock,n,load
also want a digital powder thrower and scale
tumbler

i also got another question, if i buy hornady pre inspected brand new cases i wont have to worry about case rimming, or measuring anythig right? what about if i use rem, or federal cases, any worries if i dont have a case trimmer?
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 7:51:12 AM EDT


Kool aid Kool aid drink it up yummmmm....
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 8:30:30 AM EDT
You might want to look at the Lee Classic turret press. I've had one for a week and 1/2 and its the bomb. basically its semi progressive. its a cross between a single stage and progressive. you can swap out calibers in SECONDS. WITH NO TOOLS AT ALL. the powder charge can be changed IN SECONDS
WITHOUT TOOLS!

I can run about 150 rounds an hour on mine with out the saftey prime system attached.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 8:53:32 AM EDT
Seriously, start with a single stage and learn the function of every step before moving to a progressive press.

Reloading with a progressive is a lot more complicated than dumping in the components and pulling the lever. If that's your expectation, then also expect to kaboom your rifle too. Go read J_Smith's thread on the Ammo forum and realize that Maine Cartridge Company uses commercial progressive reloaders.

Learning about setting headspace, powder selection, powder filling level in the case, and neck tension will keep you from kabooming your rifle.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 9:19:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Valkyrie:

.......................Scale, Digitals are popular, I use an RCBS 1010 that my dad bought 25 years ago that weighs out charges just as sccurate as a digital.

.......................If you need a powder thrower I would invest in one of the automatic ones that trickle a charge out onto a digital scale and stop at a preset weight. Although I still hand trickle all my taget and ground hog stuff......................




Good points. I have a PACT electronic dispenser/scale. I had been thinking of a beam scale as a backup when I bashed my electronic scale and had to send it in for repair. While it was being fixed I got an RCBS 505. If you get a beam scale, be sure it comes with a set of check weights or buy a Lyman check weight set. Otherwise you can't be sure how accurate it is.

When my PACT scale came back I set it AND my RCBS up. With the electronic scale I dispensed 5.6 grains of Titegroup for a .45ACP load I was doing and dropped in on the RCBS. It was dead on.

To really get some output from a beam scale I would get a good scale, check weights, a powder trickler and a set of Lee powder dippers. These are graduated plastic scoops that come with a cardboard calculator. If you are going to drop a 6.5 grain load of Bluedot, you go to the calculator and find Bluedot. Then you read across until you get a load just under 6.5 grains. It will tell you which dipper to use. Scoop up the Bluedot and drop it on your scale. Then trickle the last bit.

I have used this method with my electronic setup. I dump most of the powder on the electronic scale and then hit "Dispense." The dispenser then trickles the last bit out. I generally do this when I am seating the bullets at the same time I'm charging the cases. While the PACT is trickling the last bit of powder I am seating the previous bullet. (I have a single stage). Pretty fast.

If I had an electronic setup, I would still want a beam scale. Cheap backup/confirmation.
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 9:22:40 AM EDT
Dillon 550 or 650. The best.......period!
Peace,
Dragonfire52
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 9:58:48 AM EDT
im thinkin im gonna get the dillon 550b, i realize i need to learn the steps and make sure things work but i dont want to keep dumping money into shit if i get the dlillon 550b i can use it like a single stage and watch and learn each step then when im ready i can just start cranking the round out but like i said i can use it like a single stage and do each step one at a time

good to go?
im still considering the hornady maybe you guys can talk me into that?

ALSO IF I GO WITHT HE 550B DILLON, I WILL HAVE TO BUY DIES RIGHT? OR DOES IT COME WITH ONE CALIBER SET FOF DIES TO GET YOU STARTED?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 9:48:16 AM EDT
I didn't realize that Dillon had become such a big deal. I always planned on getting an RCBS (or maybe Lee if I felt poor) single-stage press and then see how well I could do loading small amounts of ammo. For now I don't need to load large amounts (unlike the original poster). I want to learn how to reload and make quality, safe pistol and rifle rounds.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 2:57:22 PM EDT
rcbs rock chucker to start with
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:23:01 PM EDT
Dillon and dont look back.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:49:07 PM EDT
Another satisfied customer jumping on the Dillion bandwagon.... you can't go wrong.
Plus... they feature hot wimminz with guns on thier monthly catalog cover

Once you get comfortable with the set-up, get thee ass over to Sinclair for precision reloading components that you wouldn't believe existed.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 4:45:45 PM EDT
For progressive, Dillon RL550B!
No other progressive loader comes close! Bar none!

If you want single stage, RCBS Rock Chucker.
No other single stage press comes close.

Personally I started with the Rock Chucker then bought the Dillon RL550B (go figure huh??)

IMO these two are THEE best reloading machines on the market

Go with the Dillon though!
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 7:06:10 PM EDT
Check out the RCBS 2000 also. It's their progressive press. You have to index it yourself like the 550 (which you can do easily since you're already putting a bullet up there), it has one more die station than the 550 like the 650. I happen to like both the priming and depriming methods better. And the powder measure stays on when changing calibers. It's also significantly cheaper to set up for a quick change to a new caliber.

If you are really cranking them out, the 650 is the way to go with auto feeds, etc.

Many guys poo-poo the idea of learning and using a single stage to begin with, but you do learn the basics, which you better have down before going to progressives. And the major advantage is that if you want to go for a short run of some caliber you don't shoot a lot of, doing it on a single stage is almost as fast as switching over the progressive and then changing it back
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 7:07:54 PM EDT
Dillon, not only becaue they're made in the free state of Arizona, but my 550 is awesome and customer service is great!
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 7:56:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AZ_Sky:
For progressive, Dillon RL550B!
No other progressive loader comes close! Bar none!



Just curious, how many other progressives have you owned?

I have a 550B, and don't consider it the best progressive.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:00:33 PM EDT
I started out with a Square Deal and didn't look back. They're super-easy to setup and produce super-accurate ammo.

Single stages are too deliberate and slow. The progressives are foolproof and I wouldn't waste my time on one.

YMMV

HH
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:04:30 PM EDT
single stage = RCBS rockchucker

progressive = Dillon

'nuff said
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 8:19:14 PM EDT
ok so how bout this i buy

a Rock chucker press
a Dillon 550b progressive
and a Lyman electronic powder thrower, and scale set up
and a good bookt o read and i will be golden for many years wouldnt you guys say?

the only down side it i will have about $800 in reloading equipment maybe more but after years of reloading it should pay itself back hahaha not mention the money i couldd make sellin rounds to buddies
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:17:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockster19:
ok so how bout this i buy

a Rock chucker press
a Dillon 550b progressive
and a Lyman electronic powder thrower, and scale set up
and a good bookt o read and i will be golden for many years wouldnt you guys say?

the only down side it i will have about $800 in reloading equipment maybe more but after years of reloading it should pay itself back hahaha not mention the money i couldd make sellin rounds to buddies



You need to be a licensed manufacturer to sell ammuntion. Any ammo that you make is for your personal use only. Also, their is a lot of liability that comes with producing ammunition.

That said..

You won't go wrong with that setup...
Though I would consider going with a Hornady LNL single stage press.
The snap in bushings make it easier to change dies.
You can convert a Rockchucker to the LNL system though.
The Rockchucker has been around forever, and it is a damned good press.

I have the Lyman scale that you are talking about..it works very well. Be sure to follow the instuctions that come with it....

You will also need a case trimmer...Hornady makes a nice manual one...

Primer flip tray or a primer tube loader like I posted about earlier..

Case lube for the bottle neck rifle dies...I use imperial sizing die wax..a tiny bit of wax rubbed on the case with your finger will do. This is quicker to do than you think. One tin will last you for years.

Deburring tool...to debur the case mouths after you trim them...
The Lee deburring tool works nicely for a few bucks...

A tumbler to clean the brass... I use bulk Midway corncob media and a bit of Midway case polish mixed in...NEVER use any amonia based stuff (I have heard NEVER to use Brasso), as it will weaken the brass. Get a Midway tumbler for about $40.

Stand alone powder measure..the Lee perfect measure works very well for about twenty bucks...
(Hint, to speed things up, set the powder measure to dump a few grains short of your measured charge, dump the powder into your scale, and let the automatic powder measure top it up to the proper charge weight.).

Also, buy the strong mount, the roller handle, and the bullet tray to go with the 550B.
If you do not have a good solid bench to mount the press on, get an old steel office desk.
The heavier the desk is, the better. You can probably find one at your local Salvation Army.

You WILL have about $1,000 bucks rolled into loading gear by the time evrything is said and done. You WILL recover this cost very easily as you WILL shoot more. You will not worry so much about the cost of ammo when buying a gun, either. Their is a way to load for just about every gun ever produced. You would be surprised what you can find dies, brass and loading info for.
Lyman publishes a good book on reloading.

Next...you will have to try bullet casting

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:33:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By HoustonHusker:
I started out with a Square Deal and didn't look back. They're super-easy to setup and produce super-accurate ammo.

Single stages are too deliberate and slow. The progressives are foolproof and I wouldn't waste my time on one.

YMMV

HH



I use a single stage for my rifle rounds. I like to size my cases all at once. Trim and debur them all at once. If I am using a ball powder or a very short stick powder, such as benchmark or a ball powder, such as WC844, I run them through a progressive to add primers, powder and bullets.

If I am using a longer stick powder, such as IMR4895 (they do not meter well in a powder measure). and I have to weigh individual charges, I use a single stage for everything. It is just easier for me to do.

I also use a single stage for special stuff like black powder cartridge...


For pistol, I would start out with a 550B and be done with it.
Most pistol is a lot easier to load than bottle neck rifle.

For my very first reloads, I would start with .45 ACP or 9mm.
These are fairly easy to load, and no brass trimming is involved.

With some powders (Tightgroup, especially), .45 ACP and other pistol calibers can be easily double charged. It is important that you watch what you are doing every minute you are loading.

Which brings me to this:

A loading press is a not a magic bullet making machine. It is a tool, just like a table saw that requires your complete and undivided attention while in operation. Follow all warnings, cautions, and instructions... Reloading is the wrong hobby to throw caution to the wind.



Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:45:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockster19:
im thinkin im gonna get the dillon 550b, i realize i need to learn the steps and make sure things work but i dont want to keep dumping money into shit if i get the dlillon 550b i can use it like a single stage and watch and learn each step then when im ready i can just start cranking the round out but like i said i can use it like a single stage and do each step one at a time

good to go?
im still considering the hornady maybe you guys can talk me into that?

ALSO IF I GO WITHT HE 550B DILLON, I WILL HAVE TO BUY DIES RIGHT? OR DOES IT COME WITH ONE CALIBER SET FOF DIES TO GET YOU STARTED?



I don't think it comes with dies...call Dillon and find out...

Makes sure you get carbide or titanium nitride dies if you want to do pistol...You wont have to lube the cases (a big time saver. carbide dies are the only way to go in a progressive).

Standard steel dies will work well for rifle as you WILL have to lube rifle case, no matter what.
With rifle dies, you will want what is known as a carbide expander. Dillon, Hornady, RCBS, Lyman, and Reading all make excellent dies.

After lubing and sizing rifle case, either wipe or use a tumbler to get all the lube off after you are done. (tumble used cases before lubing/sizing to get dirt off so you don't gum up your dies)

You WILL have to trim rifle cases. Get a dial caliper to measure case length.

Pistol cases, in general, you will not have to trim.

For military brass, the primers are crimped in, get a primer pocket reamer to cut the crimp out.
Hornady makes a nice one for a few bucks. You will never see this on commercial brass.

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:52:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By LoginName:
Another satisfied customer jumping on the Dillion bandwagon.... you can't go wrong.
Plus... they feature hot wimminz with guns on thier monthly catalog cover

Once you get comfortable with the set-up, get thee ass over to Sinclair for precision reloading components that you wouldn't believe existed.



+1 on Sinclair International...

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 3:56:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Glockster19:

i also got another question, if i buy hornady pre inspected brand new cases i wont have to worry about case rimming, or measuring anythig right? what about if i use rem, or federal cases, any worries if i dont have a case trimmer?



No No NO...

For best results, you will want to size and trim factory new cases, just like you do fired cases.

Hornady, Winchester, Federal, all make great brass. Also check out Starline for handgun brass. Starline is generally a bit less expensive, and is of outstanding quality.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:29:49 AM EDT
I started with this Redding single stage turret press. I can reload .308 and .50 AE and punch any primer with this setup. It works very well for me.

Link Posted: 3/22/2006 4:32:12 AM EDT
Dillon all the way. Spring for the 650 with case feed if you have the cash. It is WELL worth it and Dillons customer service is second to none!!!
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:35:25 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:39:28 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 6:55:29 AM EDT
Having just started reloading myself, get the best equipment you can afford so you don't have/need/want to upgrade later. I started out with a Rockchucker and was happy to begin that way since it makes you examine every part of the process closely. I just got the new Lee Classic Turret and use it as a single stage press with die holder, however, it automatically indexes for semi-progessive action--cost $75+ship from Midway until 31 March when sale ends.

I use the turret to hold my Dillon .223 sizer/electric trimmer and neck expander die. Bullet seating is still done on the RCBS with a mic die to seat my Sierra 80s out to ten-thousandths off the lands(loading rounds for 600 yards).

It's your rifle, face and hands whose destiny you control. Only get a true progessive if you will go slow enough at first to make sure you understand the whole process, safety first last and always, right?

That said, a Dillon will be in my future someday!
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top