Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 1/1/2003 10:55:22 AM EST
if any of you folks know a few links dealing with resumes, please post. what i need is some ideas on how to post a generic looking (but professional) resume that would generalize some of my past accomplishments and make it adapt to the civilian world. (note: most of my experiences are military) any Vets out there run into this same situation? i retired four years ago, and went to work for the USPS, and they pretty much have to hire a Vet so there was no need for a resume. i quit the USPS (lets just say i was disillusioned), and the new job's requirements qualify me but somehow i have to translate my experiences to "civvie" logic. and im drawing a blank, i think i have writers block......so, HELP! please!
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 11:02:56 AM EST
Great topic...I am in a similar situation and could use advise. I have been advised to customize the resume to each job which is being applied for. Like for sales...highlight accomplishments which would be valued for a sales position. I also worked with an MBA who gave me some pointers for a resume upgrade. IM me if you would like to see my latest version.
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 11:06:13 AM EST
A few to get you started. A Book at Amazon.com Does Your Resume Wear Combat Boots?: How to Turn Your Military Experience into a Good Civilian Job Offer http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1559582944/inktomi-bkasin-20/103-3155594-6146243 ========== Article Transitioning from Military to Civilian Employment: How To Best Present Yourself to Companies http://www.careerbuilder.com/JobSeeker/CareerBYTES/hints1099.htm? ========== Book The Resume Workbook: Military-to-Civilian is a fill-in-the-blanks workbook that is co-authored by Yana Parker, of Damn Good Resume Guide, and Fred Mitchell, USMC Retired. This workbook is AFFORDABLE for classroom use (so each trainee has their own copy to write in) -- and still appropriate for individual use. It features the SURE-FIRE sucessful "Ten Steps to a Great Resume" that are presented in Yana's Damn Good Resume Guide and in her Blue Collar & Beyond: Resumes for Skilled Trades & Services. For details on availability and price, please contact Fred Mitchell: fredmitchell@hotmail.com http://www.damngood.com/jobseekers/military-trans.html
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 11:12:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 1/1/2003 11:13:50 AM EST by NOVA5]
Customize it for each job, but also include skills that don't apply entirely if you have the space. (No bar room brawling does not count!), you will appear more well rounded. do not use military acronyms as most civvies will not know what you mean. if you have electronics skills mention what you can do. IE Dont say Troubleshoot and repair of combat radio systems. (yes they are digital but HR geeks won't know that) instead say Troubleshoot and repair encrypted digital radio systems. replace military works with realworld buzzwords to get past HR. any military certs that relate to the job? put them on there. Certs open the door, skill lets you walk through. no certs and you have to batter the door open but your skill keeps you in. certs and no skill? certs open the door but no skills get you tossed back out.
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 11:13:00 AM EST
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 11:21:28 AM EST
IM me and I'll try to help. What do you want to do for a living? I retired in '92 after 28 years in the Navy. I have a few examples I can provide. All the advice offered here so far is good, especially the part about tailoring. Good luck!
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 12:52:50 PM EST
One thing I learned is that most of the books are worthless, unless you are 50 years old and were the Chairman of GM and volunteered for the boyscouts for 30 years, work the soup kitchens every Christmas,... I cookbooked my first real resume after getting out the the Navy - Nuclear Power, Assistant QA officer, welder, machine tool operator, etc.... It was all lost on the human resources twit. "So you know how to use an M-16. We don't have any of them here." WTF??? So much for the BS we told each other about getting out and having jobs waiting for us.
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 1:33:07 PM EST
As someone who reads a lot of resumes and hires technical professionals, what I look for most in a resume is what the individual CAN DO for my company. What you have done and what you think you know are secondary to the consideration of your value to the company. For instance, say you had a position in the Navy in which you commanded a group of men to accomplish some particular task. To my company, that means that you have management and communications skills, as well as some administrative capability. If you want to send my a copy of your resume in confidence, I can critique it for you and point out particular strengths and weaknesses. What others have said here I agree with; that you should tailor each resume for each particular position you're going after. Remember - the purpose of a resume is not to get you a job, it's to get you an interview. Best of luck. Oh, and if you're interested in parlaying your Navy diving experience into a civilian career, try [url=http://www.oceaneering.com/employment.htm]Oceaneering[/url]. They have locations all over, but a lot of their diving operations are run out of Houston and New Orleans. They're not currently listing any openings for divers, but that's not to say that they wouldn't talk to the right motivate individual. One of my former engineers and a good friend is an engineer and commercial diver for them. You would not believe some of the stuff they do!
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 6:14:55 PM EST
oh, yeah. It is about getting an interview. A heavy equipment mechanic working here for 3 years asked me to write his resume and cover letter for a great job opportunity. He listed all the equipment he worked at, all the companies he worked for, the usual boilerplate. On the cover letter in a very promiment location with its own paragraph, I wrote (after he mentioned it in passing), "I specialize in Caterpillar engine repair." Everyone in the shop who saw that cover letter asked him about that. Put him in a whole new light, though everyone already knew that about him. Yeah, he got the job. I also put down that "I am not under the supervision of the Department of Corrections at this time," but I took it out. :)
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 6:17:38 PM EST
oh, yeah. It is about getting an interview. A heavy equipment mechanic working here for 3 years asked me to write his resume and cover letter for a great job opportunity. He listed all the equipment he worked at, all the companies he worked for, the usual boilerplate. On the cover letter in a very prominent location with its own paragraph, I wrote (after he mentioned it in passing), "I specialize in Caterpillar engine repair." Everyone in the shop who saw that cover letter asked him about that. Put him in a whole new light, though everyone already knew that about him. Yeah, he got the job. I also put down that "I am not under Department of Corrections supervision at this time," but I took it out. :) Use Spellcheck!
Link Posted: 1/1/2003 6:21:27 PM EST
I have to do my resume tomorrow morning at VEC so I can apply for a job that needs one. They have a program on the VEC computer. (Your state EC may have one as well.) Also, Works XP (adn I guess earlier versions) has a template..... Scott
Top Top