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Posted: 10/1/2006 10:08:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2006 10:47:41 PM EST by Tim84K10]
I read this book in 1997, when I was in 8th grade.

I will not justify Marcinko's actions at the end of his career, nor his fiction novels he writes today, but I think it gives an accurate description of islamic terror from the 70s to the early 90s that everyone should read.

I don't want to talk about Marcinko's fiction, that is a joke! I am talking about his first book, his own autobiography.


Thoughts?

Link Posted: 10/1/2006 10:13:01 PM EST
The guy has some issues obviously, but the the first couple books were good, then he started making up stuff and using ghost writers which ruined anything he had before.

if anything, they were entertaining. BTW, did you get the free jerky with your hardback edition?
Link Posted: 10/1/2006 10:15:22 PM EST
Nah, I have the paperback. Even my mom read it, and she is still a bit of a libtard.
Link Posted: 10/1/2006 10:45:07 PM EST
They're OK for entertainment purposes.
Link Posted: 10/1/2006 10:47:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By Gunslinger808:
They're OK for entertainment purposes.


I'm not talking about the fiction novels. I'm talking about the autobiography.
Link Posted: 10/1/2006 10:52:28 PM EST

Originally Posted By Tim84K10:

Originally Posted By Gunslinger808:
They're OK for entertainment purposes.


I'm not talking about the fiction novels. I'm talking about the autobiography.


So was he!
Link Posted: 10/1/2006 10:54:55 PM EST
Haha! The autobiography was alright. Obviously he's self centered, but damn he's been places I never will be and I still admire him. I only read the first two fiction books. Some of the shit made no sense like how he changed up that Manny Tanto/Apache character or whatever.
Link Posted: 10/1/2006 11:57:36 PM EST

Originally Posted By Alien:
Haha! The autobiography was alright. Obviously he's self centered, but damn he's been places I never will be and I still admire him. I only read the first two fiction books. Some of the shit made no sense like how he changed up that Manny Tanto/Apache character or whatever.

Honestly I can't admire a man who doesn't have the admiration of his peers. Especially in the special forces community.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 12:27:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By Enigma102083:

Originally Posted By Alien:
Haha! The autobiography was alright. Obviously he's self centered, but damn he's been places I never will be and I still admire him. I only read the first two fiction books. Some of the shit made no sense like how he changed up that Manny Tanto/Apache character or whatever.

Honestly I can't admire a man who doesn't have the admiration of his peers. Especially in the special forces community.


Not saying I admire him in the sense of idoltry, but I admire any Navy SEAL really. They are tough dudes. I wish I could be that tough.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 3:14:47 AM EST
Honestly I can't admire a man who doesn't have the admiration of his peers. Especially in the special forces community.




To some he broke the "code of silence" and let outsiders look into The Brotherhood. Others are jealous because of his fame and money.

Funny that some who criticized him wrote their own books afterward. Either way we have read some stories and learnd some things we might not have heard any other way.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 3:24:28 AM EST
I enjoyed the first two books, even though one is fiction and the other is not.

I met him out in Orlando at a book signing. I was expecting him to be taller.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 3:28:18 AM EST
I enjoyed the autobiography, and still have the hardcover version.

I actually agree with his take-no-prisoners, win-at-all-costs attitude. I've had to deal with the Navy bureaucracy, so I can understand his frustration against them, too.

Sure, he hates ringknockers, but nobody's perfect.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 3:33:13 AM EST
I have met him on a few occasions and have had the opportunity to share several cold beers with many of his team-mates as well. Interestingly, he has the undying admiration, loyalty and respect of most everyone that has served under him and with him. To a man, they have all said that he leads from the front. I think that rubbed the brass the wrong way and contributed to his downfall.

Another interesting fact, if you read the books written by his detractors, although the names have changed, many of the missions described are almost word for word as Marcinko has described.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 3:42:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By DV8:
I have met him on a few occasions and have had the opportunity to share several cold beers with many of his team-mates as well. Interestingly, he has the undying admiration, loyalty and respect of most everyone that has served under him and with him. To a man, they have all said that he leads from the front. I think that rubbed the brass the wrong way and contributed to his downfall.

Another interesting fact, if you read the books written by his detractors, although the names have changed, many of the missions described are almost word for word as Marcinko has described.



Met him several times, and he is one of the nicest folks I have ever met.

He goes to the SEAL musters every year, I have not heard of the public out cries against him like the haney guy from SFOD
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 3:51:36 AM EST
I worked with a guy (Retire Navy Capt) that indicated he knew Marcinko. I asked him if he had really done something to get in trouble. He didn't elaborate but said yes.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 5:27:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By Tim84K10:

Originally Posted By Gunslinger808:
They're OK for entertainment purposes.


I'm not talking about the fiction novels. I'm talking about the autobiography.


So was he!


"They're" seems to represent more than one book. Marcinko only has the only one book in the series that is truely nonfiction.

I have only ever met one guy that served under him...and he wouldn't talk about him at all. It sure was interesting to see the look I got when I asked, though.

I think the part of his book about Desert One is the most interesting. I personally believe that if that mission had been successful, the Arab world would fear us a lot more.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 7:55:01 AM EST
I've met him a few times also, and i'll second that he is a VERY friendly guy. Not as tall as I would have assumed, but still a scarry looking troll none the less.

Link Posted: 10/2/2006 7:58:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By Enigma102083:

Honestly I can't admire a man who doesn't have the admiration of his peers. Especially in the special forces community.



Thats doesnt bother me, too many in SF are now Politicians instead of warriors.

Marcinko was a warrior, who wasnt always popular but got the job done. We need more like him to take the fight to Al Qaeda the RIGHT way, not this pussy footing around BS
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 8:02:18 AM EST
I have read RW a few times over the years and I like it.

Have tried to read some of his other books and didn't care for them at all.

Link Posted: 10/2/2006 10:48:15 AM EST
Its an entertaining book. He made his commanding officer look like a real jerkweed, but other folks seem to have a good opinion of this officer. Always keep in mind when reading this sort of thing that you are reading only one side of the story. No doubt, he was the right person to pick to form SEAL Team Six, though.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 10:51:44 AM EST
Yes and I have an autographed copy. The original (first book) was very good in my opinion.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 11:31:50 AM EST
I liked his autobiography and read a couple of his fiction books (which I found entertaining the same way that a mindless action movie is entertaining, but entertaining nonetheless). I like his in-your-face approach to life. The man knew what he wanted and he created his own destiny. I respect that. I don't condone his actions towards the end of his career, but he did develop some good doctrine and pioneered maritime counter terrorist actions.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 11:35:56 AM EST
Yeah, the first (nonfiction) book was great....seems like a hard charger, and someone who will cut the corners to get the job done...

Personally I think he was railroaded by a bunch off brass pissed he made them look bad...

Red Cell didn't play by the rules made up by the brass to make them look good, they played by real life terrorist rules and more often than not made the brass and their bases look like shit, and exposed the weaknesses..

Made him very unpopular....

But as others have said, I never heard a bad word said about him by subordinates....
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 11:41:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2006 11:42:03 AM EST by magnum_99]
I read his autobiography sometime in the mid-90s.

My take is that he got too full of himself toward the end of his career, and thought that he no longer had to play by the Navy's rules--not too unfathomable from someone who spent his entire life figuring out how to think and fight unconventionally. It's really too bad that the bureaucrats who make up the military didn't, and don't to this day, understand how to think and fight unconventionally, and let men like Marcinko go do their thing.

He seemed to have pissed off the wrong people one too many times, and they were looking for an excuse to nail him, and he served one up on a platter.

I've met several people who have met the man, and all have good things to say about him personally.

The Navy brass DID believe he was the right man to lead Seal Team 2, Seal Team 6, and Red Cell, so he certainly was capable, qualified, and an outstanding leader in someone's eyes--at least for a time.

He also seems to truly understand the Islamists and what it would take to defeat them once and for all--too bad our weak-kneed politicians don't.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 11:55:56 AM EST
I've read them all. The fiction stuff is the same book over and over and over and over. Characters, missions, and a few tiny details are the only things that change. He has but ONE plot structure.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 11:58:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
I've read them all. The fiction stuff is the same book over and over and over and over. Characters, missions, and a few tiny details are the only things that change. He has but ONE plot structure.


Yeah, but they're fun....I love the harsh language, the stick it in the eye of the uptight brass, kill the enemy with extreme prejudice formula.....
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 12:08:52 PM EST

Originally Posted By pzjgr:

Originally Posted By Dusty_C:
I've read them all. The fiction stuff is the same book over and over and over and over. Characters, missions, and a few tiny details are the only things that change. He has but ONE plot structure.


Yeah, but they're fun....I love the harsh language, the stick it in the eye of the uptight brass, kill the enemy with extreme prejudice formula.....
Don't get me wrong, I love em all. I just wish that someone could come up with some more story lines.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 12:19:20 PM EST
My wife knew him. She worked for ComNavSpecWar Group Two back in the mid 80's. She said he was a decent man.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 12:24:12 PM EST
Biography was great, nonfiction got progressively worse as the series progressed.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 12:29:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By Alien:
Haha! The autobiography was alright. Obviously he's self centered, but damn he's been places I never will be and I still admire him. I only read the first two fiction books. Some of the shit made no sense like how he changed up that Manny Tanto/Apache character or whatever.


Most of the NF series characters were based on people he served with some were nearly direct copies.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 12:49:51 PM EST

Originally Posted By DV8:
I have met him on a few occasions and have had the opportunity to share several cold beers with many of his team-mates as well. Interestingly, he has the undying admiration, loyalty and respect of most everyone that has served under him and with him. To a man, they have all said that he leads from the front. I think that rubbed the brass the wrong way and contributed to his downfall.

Another interesting fact, if you read the books written by his detractors, although the names have changed, many of the missions described are almost word for word as Marcinko has described.

One of the things I heard from another SEAL that served with him is that he wouldn't stand for anyone that didn't agree with him to the fullest. He wouldn't allow for any decenting opinions at all. He described his early team as a buch of yes-men that would do anything he said without question.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 5:59:13 PM EST

Originally Posted By Enigma102083:

Originally Posted By DV8:
I have met him on a few occasions and have had the opportunity to share several cold beers with many of his team-mates as well. Interestingly, he has the undying admiration, loyalty and respect of most everyone that has served under him and with him. To a man, they have all said that he leads from the front. I think that rubbed the brass the wrong way and contributed to his downfall.

Another interesting fact, if you read the books written by his detractors, although the names have changed, many of the missions described are almost word for word as Marcinko has described.

One of the things I heard from another SEAL that served with him is that he wouldn't stand for anyone that didn't agree with him to the fullest. He wouldn't allow for any decenting opinions at all. He described his early team as a buch of yes-men that would do anything he said without question.
I can actually see why though, if true. You have to have people who will not question your judgement in those situations. I gotta think that if accurate, it's perfectly ok. But I could be wrong.
Link Posted: 10/2/2006 6:06:50 PM EST
I found it interesting when G. Gordon Liddy interviewed Bob Gormley some years ago when his book came out.

My take, is that Demo Dickey was a working class stiff trying to make it in an Ivy league world. He made good and that pissed the wrong people off.

'nuff said.

With regards to the end of his career, enough material was classified as "OPSEC" by his good friend (and acting counsul) Bobby Gormley, that we shall never know the truth.
Link Posted: 10/29/2006 6:02:46 PM EST
Having run-ins with the brass when youre doing something NEW or DIFFERENT than what has always been done before is normal and to be expected. Col. Beckwith had tons of problems when forming up Delta, BUT, I never heard about Col. Beckwith saying to any Generals "FUCK YOU COCKSUCKER" or whatever Marcinko claims he used to say to his Admirals. If he did that, is it any suprise to anyone that they railroaded his ass? Thats just the way that is, period.

Now, that said, the guy did our country right and my hat is off to him and his career, wish we had more like him these days....
Link Posted: 10/29/2006 6:04:06 PM EST
He's a total nutbag, but he is also a badass. Not a bad book.
Link Posted: 10/29/2006 6:14:36 PM EST
I liked Rogue Warrior, and they slowly got worse from that point. I have not read the last few, last time I picked them up in the bookstore I noticed the font size was larger with fewer pages, definately less content........
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 7:54:01 AM EST
I find it interesting that his books, like Tom Clancy's are forward thinking in terms of how they deal with the middle eastert terrorist. Both Marcinko and Clancy seem to have had an understanding before most of our politicians about how dangerous these people are and that they need to be killed.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 8:34:45 AM EST
I met him when he was signing books at Ft Campbell. He is a big son of a gun. I liked the book.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 8:46:24 AM EST
"Have I read Rogue Warrior?"

What kind of pus-nutted, no-load, son of a cur kind of question is that?
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 9:05:32 AM EST
They are making a video gane out of rogue warrior.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 11:16:57 AM EST

Originally Posted By DarkNite:
"Have I read Rogue Warrior?"

What kind of pus-nutted, no-load, son of a cur kind of question is that?


A very clear and well articulated one, shit for brains.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 11:18:29 AM EST

Originally Posted By Tim84K10:

Originally Posted By DarkNite:
"Have I read Rogue Warrior?"

What kind of pus-nutted, no-load, son of a cur kind of question is that?


A very clear and well articulated one, shit for brains.


Exactly you big asshole windbag!
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 6:45:06 PM EST
Remember this for you will see it again, tadpole.

There used to be a whole list of "Rogue-isms" on his homepage.
Link Posted: 10/30/2006 7:45:18 PM EST
i met him at a book signing and got to talk to him for like a minute,he was friendly but he was different than anyone i ever met.i dont know if larger than life is the right discription.but definatly a brook no bullshit type,you can tell h's the real thing.
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