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Posted: 8/9/2011 6:00:20 PM EDT
Steel as in siding and roof.  What are the benefits and drawbacks?  As far as I know it would lower the assessed value and reduce property tax.  I would guess it would be lower maintenance and easier to put up, and probably cheaper too, right?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:11:18 PM EDT
[#1]
Nice oven (or freezer) you plan to build.

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:13:02 PM EDT
[#2]
Quoted:
Nice oven (or freezer) you plan to build.



It would just be the outer shell.  Typical pine construction inside.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:40:31 PM EDT
[#3]
They make awesome houses. I am building one for my mom now.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:41:42 PM EDT
[#4]
Dont lean on the wall during a thunderstorm
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:44:44 PM EDT
[#5]
It'll look like a triple wide.
You'll be king of the trailer park.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:45:17 PM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
They make awesome houses. I am building one for my mom now.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Queen in her case.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:46:36 PM EDT
[#7]
Steel studs and framing?  No different than conventional.  Just higher fastener costs due to screws over nails but no big deal there because fewer screws are needed.  Slower construction.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:47:57 PM EDT
[#8]
No different that a tin roof (sans under-laying) and alum siding would be my guess. Nothing like a tin roof.....Till you have to paint the damn thing.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:55:39 PM EDT
[#9]
Quoted:
Steel studs and framing?  No different than conventional.  Just higher fastener costs due to screws over nails but no big deal there because fewer screws are needed.  Slower construction.


It would be wooden studs.  Steel would probably conduct too much heat in/out, and as you said, it would be more difficult and slower, and would it even be possible to put drywall on steel?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 6:57:56 PM EDT
[#10]
I think he's talking about a building/house sided and roofed with something like an R panel.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 8:52:04 PM EDT
[#11]
I've been in mine for 5 years now and it is just dandy, built it by myself. I used the foil bubble wrap to seal the house up before putting the metal on and it reduces the radiant heat transfer by 95% they claim. I used galvalume painted metal with a 30 year warranty on the paint - ivory on the siding and forest green for the roof. And I thought it would have been cheaper for tax purposes but it was just the opposite here - they assessed me higher because of the metal (steel) siding.  I used typical 2x4 construction with 1x4 pine lath boards spaced 2' oc to attach the metal to. The bubble wrap went over top of the lath and all, sealed seams with the metal duct tape, then cut out the openings for the doors & windows. I have an excellent vapor barrier and the wrap really does make a huge difference on reflecting heat - out in the summer and keeping some in during winter - the foil is on both sides on what I used, they do make with foil on one side only too. Mine doesn't look like a mobile home - for one thing the metal seams are verticle, not horizontal . I built mine on a slab too, not sitting up on a foundation and also have nice porches and an attached garage.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 8:54:05 PM EDT
[#12]
I know 2 people that have them .
Very nice. We intend do build one someday.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:06:15 PM EDT
[#13]
It's the way to go, maintenance is much less then wood. Look on line, when I was in the market some companies made them look like cedar, stucco, and various finishes, and they look good. When your buddies painting his wood sided house you can go shooting! Benefit of steel studs is you can actually square up your walls, without  any waves down the walls. One drawback is you need to put up some backing anywhere you want to mount shelves, drapes etc. because those steel studs will not hold a screw like a 2x4.  As far as price, all depends on steel prices, which can fluctuate fast. Course I bought my steel at the peak of the market.
Go for it!  
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:09:59 PM EDT
[#14]
I built the world's largest indoor steel shoot house.



I know that is not what you asked, but I felt like pulling my dick out.




Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:10:10 PM EDT
[#15]
Quoted:
Nice oven (or freezer) you plan to build.



I know people who have built modern homes with cor-ten (sp) plates and the heat issue in Texas is significant.  Try to plan on eliminating thermal bridging between the skin and the frame as much as you can.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:10:27 PM EDT
[#16]
Quoted:
It's the way to go, maintenance is much less then wood. Look on line, when I was in the market some companies made them look like cedar, stucco, and various finishes, and they look good. When your buddies painting his wood sided house you can go shooting! Benefit of steel studs is you can actually square up your walls, without  any waves down the walls. One drawback is you need to put up some backing anywhere you want to mount shelves, drapes etc. because those steel studs will not hold a screw like a 2x4.  As far as price, all depends on steel prices, which can fluctuate fast. Course I bought my steel at the peak of the market.
Go for it!  


Wouldn't steel studs cause a heating/cooling issue, since steel conducts heat well and the studs would connect the outside with the inside?

When I was young we had aluminum windows, and during the winter a thick layer of frost would form on the inside of the frames.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:15:23 PM EDT
[#17]
Quoted:
I built the world's largest indoor steel shoot house.

I know that is not what you asked, but I felt like pulling my dick out.

http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus1.jpg


Well you can pull your dick out more if ya got more pics (of the shoot house that is). It looks massive. (again the shoot house)

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:20:16 PM EDT
[#18]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Steel studs and framing?  No different than conventional.  Just higher fastener costs due to screws over nails but no big deal there because fewer screws are needed.  Slower construction.


It would be wooden studs.  Steel would probably conduct too much heat in/out, and as you said, it would be more difficult and slower, and would it even be possible to put drywall on steel?


Most commercial buildings use metal studs now...and the drywall goes on the same way as before.  Electrical is ran through a "knock-out" instead of drilling holes in the wooden stud.

Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:22:37 PM EDT
[#19]
One of my friends used the spray insulation on his.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:24:30 PM EDT
[#20]
My Dad built one that is entirely made of steel (except for the drywall, but siding roof and framing) and it is awesome. You wouldn't know it from a stick framed house unless you really looked.
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:27:27 PM EDT
[#21]
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:30:06 PM EDT
[#22]
N'vmnd - wrong thread...
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:31:19 PM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:
My Dad built one that is entirely made of steel (except for the drywall, but siding roof and framing) and it is awesome. You wouldn't know it from a stick framed house unless you really looked.


Does it hold temperature?
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:38:41 PM EDT
[#24]



Quoted:



Quoted:

I built the world's largest indoor steel shoot house.



I know that is not what you asked, but I felt like pulling my dick out.



http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus1.jpg




Well you can pull your dick out more if ya got more pics (of the shoot house that is). It looks massive. (again the shoot house)





Design and materials by Range Systems, started putting it together in Baghdad in 04. Had it complete some time in early 05.



http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1421929/posts

http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus3.jpg

http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus4.jpg
It's armor grade steel lined with bricks made from recycled tire rubber combines somehow with titanium. Absorbs bullets like a sponge. The sliding doors you see let you change the layout. The wooden doors are replaceable, and you can see that one has been explosively breached.
Some doofus from the ICTF set the whole thing on fire using tracers, though.  It looked like a tire-fire from the pictures.



Looks like they painted it afterwards: http://www.shadowspear.com/vb/threads/iraqi-36th-commandos-trained-by-ussf-advisors.4128/page-2


 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:47:09 PM EDT
[#25]



Quoted:



Quoted:

Steel studs and framing?  No different than conventional.  Just higher fastener costs due to screws over nails but no big deal there because fewer screws are needed.  Slower construction.




It would be wooden studs.  Steel would probably conduct too much heat in/out, and as you said, it would be more difficult and slower, and would it even be possible to put drywall on steel?


Done all the time.  The area of conduction of steel studs is tiny so the heat loss/gain is minimal compared to wood.



 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 9:55:11 PM EDT
[#26]



Quoted:



Quoted:

My Dad built one that is entirely made of steel (except for the drywall, but siding roof and framing) and it is awesome. You wouldn't know it from a stick framed house unless you really looked.




Does it hold temperature?


Steel studs are 22-24 gauge galvanized sheet, folded into shape.  The web portion is 3.5" deep or so but only a single thickness of 22 gauge at the most (0.034").  Compared to pine at 1.5" thick, steel is only a tiny bit less insulating.  Until you realize insulation that can be stuffed into the bays, then the steel comes out ahead!



 
Link Posted: 8/9/2011 10:07:02 PM EDT
[#27]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:
My Dad built one that is entirely made of steel (except for the drywall, but siding roof and framing) and it is awesome. You wouldn't know it from a stick framed house unless you really looked.


Does it hold temperature?

Steel studs are 22-24 gauge galvanized sheet, folded into shape.  The web portion is 3.5" deep or so but only a single thickness of 22 gauge at the most (0.034").  Compared to pine at 1.5" thick, steel is only a tiny bit less insulating.  Until you realize insulation that can be stuffed into the bays, then the steel comes out ahead!
 


Do steel studs have the support capacity of regular 2x6 wood studs?  The steel studs I'm familiar with can be twisted by hand.
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 7:45:36 AM EDT
[#28]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:
I built the world's largest indoor steel shoot house.

I know that is not what you asked, but I felt like pulling my dick out.

http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus1.jpg


Well you can pull your dick out more if ya got more pics (of the shoot house that is). It looks massive. (again the shoot house)


Design and materials by Range Systems, started putting it together in Baghdad in 04. Had it complete some time in early 05.




http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1421929/posts
http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus3.jpg
http://www.punk-rock.com/iraq/shoothaus4.jpg



It's armor grade steel lined with bricks made from recycled tire rubber combines somehow with titanium. Absorbs bullets like a sponge. The sliding doors you see let you change the layout. The wooden doors are replaceable, and you can see that one has been explosively breached.



Some doofus from the ICTF set the whole thing on fire using tracers, though.  It looked like a tire-fire from the pictures.

Looks like they painted it afterwards: http://www.shadowspear.com/vb/threads/iraqi-36th-commandos-trained-by-ussf-advisors.4128/page-2



 



Awesome. Thanks for sharing. I wonder what the cost was on that set up....
Link Posted: 8/10/2011 8:52:14 AM EDT
[#29]
I think the OP is just talking about metal wall and roof panels over traditional stick framed construction. There's a ton of different types of panels, from standard looking stamped shakes to all kinds of wild stuff. If I were going to build a post modern house, I'd go all metal and composite.

I've worked with all of these below, and they're not cheap.






They also make an insulated panel. Check out MBCI's site.
Link Posted: 8/12/2011 10:48:01 AM EDT
[#30]


This is in Texas, right? I know I've seen that pic before.
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