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Posted: 7/23/2013 3:26:12 AM EST
3d printing, computer design, ability to make molds etc easily

What will that do to the arts?

I just moved a bunch of decorative stuff for a ceremony. The only stuff that looked hand made was the very old wrought iron stuff. Which was awesome.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:28:21 AM EST
Someone has to enter the data into the machine or use a program to design an object.

The sculptor has to change tools.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:29:04 AM EST
Art is now lady gaga or smearing poop on any book except one.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:32:52 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Rustyprop:
Someone has to enter the data into the machine or use a program to design an object.

The sculptor has to change tools.
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Artists with pocket protectors
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:32:58 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:39:00 AM EST
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Originally Posted By mike_nds:
So....................I'm an artist. Can I get an NEA grant for a free 3-D printer?
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Does it involve something offensive and tasteless?
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 3:52:18 AM EST
When I was in college(photo degree), photoshop had just come out. The big debate was whether or not it was art. The purists refused to take the photoshop classes. Wonder where they buy film these days I submit that art evolves just like anything else and people will still pay top dollar for hand crafted stuff.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:07:08 AM EST
Art always changes.

I'm sure many people thought painting would be killed by photography. But it actually allowed guys like Monet, Matisse, and Picasso to take painting in an entirely new direction.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:08:29 AM EST
Technology makes it easier for anyone (even clumsy people!) to do art!
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:15:19 AM EST
the human hand and skill is what makes high art high art.

No worries.

Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:18:01 AM EST
Art is more than just making faithful or correct copies of something. Just look at today's virtuoso painters who can do anything with a brush except paint a great painting.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:19:38 AM EST
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:26:02 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 4:27:10 AM EST by HeckThomas]
art is always a great example of a disappearing middle class.

the rich will always spend the money to own a Remmington piece and the poor will buy something from Tuesday Morning. The middleclass buyer who used to purchase from your local artist doesn't really exist anymore.

The technology cheapens the value of the product.

Right now a good tattoo artist will cost $200 an hour but in ten years the same tattoo will be bought for 50 bucks at the tattoo machine at the front of wal mart - will the quality be the same probably not but the clients get used to excepting cheaper quality products.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:27:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/23/2013 4:27:47 AM EST by John_Wayne777]
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:29:38 AM EST
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Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:


Look up 3d scanning. Sculpt something, scan it in 3d to translate it into animation or CAD software. The process is heavily used in computer animation.
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Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
3d printing, computer design, ability to make molds etc easily

What will that do to the arts?

I just moved a bunch of decorative stuff for a ceremony. The only stuff that looked hand made was the very old wrought iron stuff. Which was awesome.


Look up 3d scanning. Sculpt something, scan it in 3d to translate it into animation or CAD software. The process is heavily used in computer animation.



see Kung Fu Panda 3 - Chinese do cheaper
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:35:27 AM EST
Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
3d printing, computer design, ability to make molds etc easily

What will that do to the arts?

I just moved a bunch of decorative stuff for a ceremony. The only stuff that looked hand made was the very old wrought iron stuff. Which was awesome.
View Quote


If you want to produce mass quantities of resin sculptures the you use 3D printing to produce a mold or CNC machining.

Traditional sculpture, though, is not resin casting or CNC machining. It has always depended on patronage of some kind to exist, as the average person cannot commission a piece for their home. Cut stone, bronze casting, metals sculptures are all hands-on methods that cannot be replicated by 3D printing or CNC machining, those pieces that are small enough to be replicated this way and lend themselves to it have been done for a number of years in China as cheap knock-offs.

Traditional sculpture is no more dead than it has ever been.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:38:33 AM EST
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Originally Posted By HeckThomas:
art is always a great example of a disappearing middle class.

the rich will always spend the money to own a Remmington piece and the poor will buy something from Tuesday Morning. The middleclass buyer who used to purchase from your local artist doesn't really exist anymore.

The technology cheapens the value of the product.

Right now a good tattoo artist will cost $200 an hour but in ten years the same tattoo will be bought for 50 bucks at the tattoo machine at the front of wal mart - will the quality be the same probably not but the clients get used to excepting cheaper quality products.
View Quote


The 'middle class' has always bought the cheapest POS that it can get away with. When that was a $500 painting, they bought that. When it was a $50 print of a $500 painting they bought that instead.

Art has become more accessible with technology, not less. But that means that the mediums have changed and there will be fewer broadly popular and unique items.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:44:40 AM EST
Artist use the current tools that they have available to them. Will it replace the work that Michelangelo did. NO ! Nothing every will. There will be some artist who will still sculpt that way and others who use the new tools.
As an artist I still use the old paints and brushes and paint realistically most of the time. But that's my deal and I enjoy it.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:47:44 AM EST
No doubt many purists were non-plussed when pneumatic tools were introduced to sculpture. Or diamond bladed saws for that matter. If we're talking about working in stone.

Art is about working with the medium and the tools to make an expression of that thing that is rattling around your head and sharing it with the world. I have no problem with someone working with a 3D printer because no doubt some great art will be produced by one. And an awful lot of completely dreadful junk will also be made.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:49:29 AM EST


No: this one of my pieces.

Indelible Images

Www.facebook.com/indelibleimagesart

Conventional sculpting will always have a place. But production will be technological.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 4:49:50 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By HeckThomas:
art is always a great example of a disappearing middle class.

the rich will always spend the money to own a Remmington piece and the poor will buy something from Tuesday Morning. The middleclass buyer who used to purchase from your local artist doesn't really exist anymore.

The technology cheapens the value of the product.

Right now a good tattoo artist will cost $200 an hour but in ten years the same tattoo will be bought for 50 bucks at the tattoo machine at the front of wal mart - will the quality be the same probably not but the clients get used to excepting cheaper quality products.
View Quote


Very interesting.
I am completely ignorant of art.
I do enjoy going to PR and Miami and looking at what the local artists have to offer
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 12:08:05 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 1IV:
http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb358/oneissuevoter/484AE5EC-643C-4A6F-9FFE-7942FB126389-2486-0000040A6C2C3F80.jpg

No: this one of my pieces.

Indelible Images

Www.facebook.com/indelibleimagesart

Conventional sculpting will always have a place. But production will be technological.
View Quote

Link Posted: 7/24/2013 8:43:40 AM EST
Just went to Craig Tracy's art gallery. Wife dropped a few hundred.
Art makes me sad.
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