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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 1/3/2006 7:31:14 PM EDT
Or bitch about. Probably bitch about.link
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:38:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/3/2006 7:38:24 PM EDT by Greenhorn]
I can't read those phrases, but it is interesting how many Latin words are similar to Spanish.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:39:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
I can't read those phrases, but it is interesting how many Latin words are similar to Spanish.



That's because Spanish is based in large part on Latin. Same with Italian and (to a lesser extent) French.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:40:44 PM EDT
It's because Spanish, Emglish, German and others are romance languages, meaning they are based on latin. It's a sham Latin isn't widely taught in basic education any longer, because it makes it easier to understand the english language, as well as similar languages.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:44:36 PM EDT
German and English aren't romance languages
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:51:06 PM EDT
Cool. I like them.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:52:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sharky30:
German and English aren't romance languages
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages




I blame it on the Tennessee public education system which taught me my limited knowledge of Spanish. However, viritas means truth in Latin, and very means, well you know what very means in English. So, much of English comes from Latin, even if it's not technically a Romance language.

I'll stop now, as I don't really know what the hell I'm talking about.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:53:31 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DangerDave:

Originally Posted By sharky30:
German and English aren't romance languages
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages




I blame it on the Tennessee public education system which taught me my limited knowledge of Spanish. However, viritas means truth in Latin, and very means, well you know what very means in English. So, much of English comes from Latin, even if it's not technically a Romance language.

I'll stop now, as I don't really know what the hell I'm talking about.



WTF!
Its spelled Veritas in Latin. And Veritas and Very are not related words at all.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:58:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ZootTX:

Originally Posted By DangerDave:

Originally Posted By sharky30:
German and English aren't romance languages
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages




I blame it on the Tennessee public education system which taught me my limited knowledge of Spanish. However, viritas means truth in Latin, and very means, well you know what very means in English. So, much of English comes from Latin, even if it's not technically a Romance language.

I'll stop now, as I don't really know what the hell I'm talking about.



WTF!
Its spelled Veritas in Latin. And Veritas and Very are not related words at all.




Sorry Maximas. Can't you find a post with some misspelled English to pounce on? Shouldn't be too hard.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 7:58:43 PM EDT
Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem.
Stand aside, little people! I'm here on official business


I really would like to know how to pronounce this one.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:00:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem.
Stand aside, little people! I'm here on official business


I really would like to know how to pronounce this one.



I bet Zoot could tell you.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:00:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem.
Stand aside, little people! I'm here on official business


I really would like to know how to pronounce this one.



Classical, or Church? I'm here to help.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:01:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DangerDave:

Originally Posted By ZootTX:

Originally Posted By DangerDave:

Originally Posted By sharky30:
German and English aren't romance languages
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages




I blame it on the Tennessee public education system which taught me my limited knowledge of Spanish. However, viritas means truth in Latin, and very means, well you know what very means in English. So, much of English comes from Latin, even if it's not technically a Romance language.

I'll stop now, as I don't really know what the hell I'm talking about.



WTF!
Its spelled Veritas in Latin. And Veritas and Very are not related words at all.




Sorry Maximas. Can't you find a post with some misspelled English to pounce on? Shouldn't be too hard.



Its spelled Maximus, and I'm not usually a grammar nazi, but when you are pretending to dissect the Latin language, you should at least know how to spell the word.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:02:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DangerDave:

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem.
Stand aside, little people! I'm here on official business


I really would like to know how to pronounce this one.



I bet Zoot could tell you.


Did I really hurt your feelings that much?
Get the sand out of your mangina, please.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:03:33 PM EDT
I'll stop now, as I don't really know what the hell I'm talking about.

Did you miss that part? Sheesh.



Carry on.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:06:47 PM EDT

Cum catapultae proscriptae erunt tum soli proscript catapultas habebunt.
When catapults are outlawed, only outlaws will have catapults.



A soon to be arfcom classic.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:09:22 PM EDT
How would one say .45 is superior to 9mm in Latin?
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:10:59 PM EDT
My hovercraft is full of eels. Please fondle my buttocks.

<­BR>

Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:43:22 PM EDT
jeebus

all languages based on latin are called "romance languages" these include italian, french, spanish. if you speak latin or a romance language you can get by ok in any country that speaks a romance language.

all non-latin based languages are referred to as "barbaric" languages.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:55:29 PM EDT
I don't think that they had bumpers or bumper stickers back when Latin was the rage....
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 8:57:33 PM EDT
Sugatis.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 9:11:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
all non-latin based languages are referred to as "barbaric" languages.



Uhm, maybe if you are a Roman citizen from two thousand or so years ago. Otherwise, no.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 9:43:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Tomislav:

Originally Posted By DvlDog:
all non-latin based languages are referred to as "barbaric" languages.



Uhm, maybe if you are a Roman citizen from two thousand or so years ago. Otherwise, no.



And the Romans did not consider Greek barbaric.
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 10:05:45 PM EDT
Something I learned in Latin class:

Latin is a dead lan-guage, as dead as it can be.
First it killed the Romans, and now its killin me!
Link Posted: 1/3/2006 10:08:59 PM EDT
Swearing in latin:

Stercum - Sh*t
Flocci non facio - I don't give a damn
tua mater - your mother
Dormi mecum - sleep with me
Tu es stultior quam asinus
- you are dumber than an ass
cunnus - c*nt
irrumator - bastard
leno - pimp
mentula - penis
meretrix - prostitute
Orcae Ita! - Hell Yeah!
spucatum tauri - Bull sh*t
pudor tu - fark you

Mutato nomine de te fabula narratur. (laugh all you want, the joke's on you).


Link Posted: 1/3/2006 10:23:41 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/3/2006 10:25:35 PM EDT by Zardoz]
Carpe breastum.

I know, it's not correct, but everybody ought to be able to get the idea.

Link Posted: 1/3/2006 10:57:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DangerDave:
It's because Spanish, Emglish, German and others are romance languages, meaning they are based on latin. .



Nope. Latin is an Italic language, German and English are Germanic languages. All of them are Indo-European languages though.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 12:35:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By julenissen:

Originally Posted By DangerDave:
It's because Spanish, Emglish, German and others are romance languages, meaning they are based on latin. .



Nope. Latin is an Italic language, German and English are Germanic languages. All of them are Indo-European languages though.



All languages based on Latin are Romance Languages. True, Latin is an Italic language, and is from a different family than the Germanic Languages. Many European words have their origin in India, in the Sanskrit language, from the Aryans.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 12:37:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem.
Stand aside, little people! I'm here on official business


I really would like to know how to pronounce this one.



Classical, or Church? I'm here to help.



There are two ways to pronounce Latin. One uses Italian ways of pronouncing words, a method common at the Vatican and among Catholic priests. The other way seeks to pronounce Latin without the Italian accents. You find this version of pronunciation in Latin classes. I've heard both, and always felt the Italian way of pronouncing Latin words to be somewhat artificial.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 12:38:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZootTX:

Originally Posted By DangerDave:

Originally Posted By sharky30:
German and English aren't romance languages
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_languages




I blame it on the Tennessee public education system which taught me my limited knowledge of Spanish. However, viritas means truth in Latin, and very means, well you know what very means in English. So, much of English comes from Latin, even if it's not technically a Romance language.

I'll stop now, as I don't really know what the hell I'm talking about.



WTF!
Its spelled Veritas in Latin. And Veritas and Very are not related words at all.



Veritas means truth. Very and Truly are synonymous - He is very stupid = He is truly stupid. He is stupid, in truth. So it is clear that they are related.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 12:55:06 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 6:09:54 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 6:18:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By -brass-:
What was the conversation between Doc Holliday and Ringo in Tombstone?



Doc: He reminds me of... Me. Now I really hate him.

Wyatt: [To Curly Bill and Johnny, holding up hands in placatory gesture.] He's drunk.

[Doc takes another drink from his tin cup.]

Doc: In vino veritas. / Wine loosens the tongue.

"There are sleeping drunks and fighting drunks and quiet drunks and talkative drunks. In vino veritas, an old Roman proverb, with the literal meaning 'in wine the truth', tells us that people under the influence of wine or other spirits will say things they ordinarily try to conceal." 1

Ringo: Age quod agis. / Pay attention to what you are doing.

(Or, in this case, "You'd better be careful" or "Watch what you say".)

"Age quod agis, literally 'do what you are doing', is excellent advice for those who become careless in their work as well as for those who fail to do what they are supposed to do." 2

Doc: Credat Iudaeus Apella, non ego. / Tell it to the Marines, not me.

This phrase comes from a work by Horace; literally, I believe that this reads "Let the Jew Apella believe it; I will not." Roget's Thesaurus entry #497 (absurdity) gives "Credat Judaeus Apella" the loose translation "Tell it to the Marines", while entry #485 (unbelief) suggests "Let those believe who may."

"Iudaeus" is sometimes spelled "Judaeus".

Ringo: Iuventus stultorum... [he indicates his revolver] ...magister. / Youth is the teacher of fools.

"Iuventus" is sometimes spelled "juventus".

or...

Ringo: Eventus stultorum... [he indicates his revolver] ...magister. / Fools must be taught by experience.

(You decide which is correct.)

Doc: [Half-whispering with heightened intensity.] In pace requiescat! / Rest in peace!

Link Posted: 1/4/2006 6:27:48 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 6:35:30 AM EDT
Cibi condimentum essa famem, potionis sitim.

This always stuck with me. I took 2 years of Latin and it indeed makes languages easier to learn by giving you the roots.

"The best seasoning for food is hunger, for drink, thirst
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 6:46:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jkstexas2001:

Originally Posted By FLAL1A:

Originally Posted By HarrySacz:
Recedite, plebes! Gero rem imperialem.
Stand aside, little people! I'm here on official business


I really would like to know how to pronounce this one.



Classical, or Church? I'm here to help.



There are two ways to pronounce Latin. One uses Italian ways of pronouncing words, a method common at the Vatican and among Catholic priests. The other way seeks to pronounce Latin without the Italian accents. You find this version of pronunciation in Latin classes. I've heard both, and always felt the Italian way of pronouncing Latin words to be somewhat artificial.



Interesting, I feel exactly the opposite. I learned Classical in High School and took advanced classes in college. In college we had an Nigerian Jesuit who spoke and taught Latin with an Italian accent. Once I got used to it, it seemed more in sync with what was originally spoken all those years ago. Kind of like Old English.

I mean, doesn't this sound better when you imagine Kenneth Branagh rather than say, Adam Sandler? :

"I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,
Straining upon the start. The game's afoot!
Follow your spirit; and upon this charge
Cry 'God for Harry! England and Saint George!"

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