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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 7/31/2004 3:23:54 PM EST
I'm looking at getting a safe to keep my toys in. In comes standard with a dial combination lock. $23 more for a key lock to prevent the dial from moving unless the key is in, and $125 more for an electronic push button lock.

The eletronic lock has the battery on the outside so you change it easily.

Which lock would you take, and why? My concern is, what if the electronic lock dies while the safe is locked?

Thanks for any thoughts...
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:34:16 PM EST
dial wont fail after a emp!
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:38:57 PM EST
I have two safes one with each type. I tend to open the push button one the most.
M
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:39:05 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:39:36 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/31/2004 3:41:08 PM EST by BobCole]
Most quality safes use a Sgt. & Greenleaf lock. If a safe didn't have this I'd rate it as low quality, IMO. Ditto foe the dial key lock. ALL good safes already have that.

As for the electric dial, I've been told you can still get in it somehow but I don't recall how exactly.

What if you forget to charge it or go on vacation & need a rifle RIGHT NOW & the battery doesn't work? Too risky for me, YMMV.

I know that dial is always going to work, no matter what.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:39:51 PM EST
Get an electronic one. Change the batteries on your birthday to keep them fresh. Keep a working light on top of your safe no matter what kind of combination you get.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:50:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By 7:
Get an electronic one. Change the batteries on your birthday to keep them fresh. Keep a working light on top of your safe no matter what kind of combination you get.



And a pair of glasses.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:53:30 PM EST
Dial. More trouble free.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 3:56:55 PM EST
I have an electronic one that you turn back and forth a couple times to "charge it" - so no batteries to wear down. Also I can change the combo at my leisure, and they are every bit as secure as the dails, according to the locksmith I bought the safe from. I am sold on this type, very fast and easy. If I buy another safe, I should when I buy another safe, I will have the electronic lock installed.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 4:03:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By Q:

Originally Posted By 7:
Get an electronic one. Change the batteries on your birthday to keep them fresh. Keep a working light on top of your safe no matter what kind of combination you get.



And a pair of glasses.



The glasses are a good idea.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 5:46:20 PM EST
My vote is for the dial. Living in Florida AND along the coast, I have to keep in mind hurricanes. Should the roof blow off/leak, I don't have to worry about my key pad getting wet and not working. Never have to worry about dead batteries OR a failed key pad. I trust mechanical things more than electronic in this application. How many of us want "smart guns" and why not?
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 5:53:26 PM EST
Electronic.

For all the reasons listed.

2 years now on the same batteries, FYI
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:00:53 PM EST

Originally Posted By GREYGHOSTt:
dial wont fail after a emp!



Yep! and there is no little elctronic motor to burn out.... WTF happens then?

I opted for the manual (Gold plated naturally)
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:03:48 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:05:07 PM EST
I vote for the Electronic DIAL. No batteries. Spin the dial to charge it up. Digital readout.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:15:31 PM EST
Most house fires would render an electronic lock completely useless, since the keypad and electronics won't withstand the intense heat. Since electronic locks depend on the operation of a solenoid or motor to unlatch the door, this heat damage could also make it very difficult for a locksmith to open the safe afterwards.

If quick access is essential, consider getting a safe equipped with both a mechanical dial lock and a key lock. The key lock will provide quick access when you're at home, and the dial lock will provide maximum security when you're not.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:16:31 PM EST
Keep it simple, go with the dial.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:25:10 PM EST
I vote for the dial. Keep it simple .
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:34:02 PM EST
This was actually discussed maybe 1-1.5 years ago, & there were mixed inputs, but one of the repeated comments that stuck out was that ofted-punched combination keys will eventually start to show signs of ware/fade, making it potentially easier for a would-be burglar to simply try hitting different combinations of the visibly worn keys to get it open. Now, no one here has stated this, so maybe I'm speaking out of turn.

Fact is, I'm looking for a safe that can be broken down for easier hauling, & Zanotti is the only maker of this safe type that I'm aware of. They are nice, albeit double the price of comparable std units. In my case, I'll settle for the peace-of-mind that a dial offers. I think you can get both input types (dial & button), but I'm not too worried about being able to get at the safe, as I keep a revolver around at all times anyhow (No kids to worry about, & our dogs don't have opposing thumbs. The cat might be another matter, but so far she's been hands off ). I'd stick w/ the simple, no-maintenance dial. The faded combination buttons compromise security, IMO.

If the dial's slower input speed bothers you, you can always keep the combination dialed up to the last entry in the combination so you only have to dial in that last combination # to get the safe open. YMMV.

Cheers
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:47:25 PM EST
The electronic is easier to use.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:47:28 PM EST
Tagged
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 6:58:45 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/31/2004 6:59:40 PM EST by Quarterbore]
I have a big Browning safe with the dial and with the funky way you need to get your numbers it would be very tough for a BG to pick. I do agree that the keypad would be quicker... In my bedroom I have a small safe that has an electronic keypad and I keep a pistol in there as it takes a couple seconds to unlock. I like both and when I need a second safe I will likely get the next with the keypad so the BG can play with both while the alarm is going off and the dog is chewing on his leg
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 7:14:19 PM EST

Thanks for all the comments so far! I've pretty much had all the same thoughts, and was hoping to tip the scale one way or another. I will have to speak with the manufacturer and find out a few things before I decide. I am concerned about the long term life of the electronic locking mechanism, especially since it will be in my humid basement.


Originally Posted By Master_Blaster:

Fact is, I'm looking for a safe that can be broken down for easier hauling, & Zanotti is the only maker of this safe type that I'm aware of.



This is the exact safe I'm looking at! I want something easy to move, since I will probably move around some more in my life.

Link Posted: 7/31/2004 10:26:01 PM EST
I've got the dial lock. It was less expensive. Damn it's hard to buy something for guns that is almost the price of another gun.
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 10:31:36 PM EST
both safes i got are dial . I don't trust the electronic safes around a child, buttons and children dont mix to well.

<­BR>

(one safe is looking for a good home )
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 10:48:37 PM EST
ask the safe dealer this question ..... what if a burglar breaks into your house and finds your electronic locked safe, then takes a hammer and beats the fuck out of the keypad trying to open it, how do YOU open the safe or get the keypad replaced?


fire is another issue, with the keypad melting
Link Posted: 7/31/2004 11:07:28 PM EST
I like my dial...


- georgestrings
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 12:48:14 AM EST

Originally Posted By Garand1911:
ask the safe dealer this question ..... what if a burglar breaks into your house and finds your electronic locked safe, then takes a hammer and beats the fuck out of the keypad trying to open it, how do YOU open the safe or get the keypad replaced?


fire is another issue, with the keypad melting



The Locksmith brings out a new keypad, plugs it in and you open the safe. If the burglar beats the dial lock up, there is no opening reference even if te relocker didn't work and the safe gets drilled to open. If the keypad melts, the same repair would apply to the dial lock since it will also melt. Again, the safe gets drilled to open. The bigger safe manufacturers loke Librty and Fort Knox will warranty a safe for life as long as it's been registered even for damage in a burglary or fire.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 2:42:08 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 5:47:04 AM EST

Originally Posted By Garand1911:
ask the safe dealer this question ..... what if a burglar breaks into your house and finds your electronic locked safe, then takes a hammer and beats the fuck out of the keypad trying to open it, how do YOU open the safe or get the keypad replaced?


fire is another issue, with the keypad melting



That VERY same thing could happen to a dial
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 6:06:39 AM EST
If you opt for the digital lock then spend the extra cash and install the self generating type. Where you spin the wheel a few times it generates a charge and lets you input the combo numbers. Best type is made by "Mas-Hamilton" I've never encountered a gun safe that I haven't opened in less than 15 minutes, fire damaged or not. My service fee to open a safe is $75.00. Thats without any lock replacement. As far as the drill points go the welder on the truck fills them in real nice. Oh by the way my safe at home has a S/G dial on it.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 6:10:44 AM EST
Can you upgrade a S&G dial to a electronic one? I didnt have alot of cash so I bought the best safe I could afford 3 years ago. But constantly going in and out of it is annoying with a dial. Are retro-fit kits available?

Link Posted: 8/1/2004 6:13:17 AM EST

Originally Posted By mag162:
If you opt for the digital lock then spend the extra cash and install the self generating type. Where you spin the wheel a few times it generates a charge and lets you input the combo numbers. Best type is made by "Mas-Hamilton" I've never encountered a gun safe that I haven't opened in less than 15 minutes, fire damaged or not. My service fee to open a safe is $75.00. Thats without any lock replacement. As far as the drill points go the welder on the truck fills them in real nice. Oh by the way my safe at home has a S/G dial on it.



Whats you territory? Lower NY? Westchester County? I got a job for you if your local.

Link Posted: 8/1/2004 6:18:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/1/2004 6:19:36 AM EST by hepcat85]

Originally Posted By MDS:
I have two safes one with each type. I tend to open the push button one the most.
M






Kidding MDS

I have a dial, but I can see the utility of the electronic.

Fact is, with the dial you need to work alittle harder.....but it'll function forever.

Electronic is easier, but you need batts.

I would go with dial and just tough it out.

Link Posted: 8/1/2004 6:31:59 AM EST


I started out with a dial on my Ft. Knox. Didin't take me long to switch over to the keypad.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 7:35:45 AM EST
My shop is in Queens we travel all over the tri state area though. And yes you can later upgrade to the digital lock from an S/G dial. It'll cost about $150.00 for the lock and dial I think dont quote me on it though.
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 8:33:03 AM EST

Originally Posted By Master_Blaster:
This was actually discussed maybe 1-1.5 years ago, & there were mixed inputs, but one of the repeated comments that stuck out was that ofted-punched combination keys will eventually start to show signs of ware/fade, making it potentially easier for a would-be burglar to simply try hitting different combinations of the visibly worn keys to get it open. Now, no one here has stated this, so maybe I'm speaking out of turn.

I think that was my thread. I bought one with a dial, BTW...
Link Posted: 8/1/2004 9:36:29 AM EST
Dial
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 6:40:37 AM EST

Originally Posted By Garand1911:
ask the safe dealer this question ..... what if a burglar breaks into your house and finds your electronic locked safe, then takes a hammer and beats the fuck out of the keypad trying to open it, how do YOU open the safe or get the keypad replaced?


fire is another issue, with the keypad melting



fire could also melt a dial
a burglar could also beat the fuck outta a dial as well

In any event you are not getting in anytime soon....Cannon will replace the ELECTRONIC keypad in either case.......so good question to ask the dealer. Don't know about other manuf's.
Q
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 6:44:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/2/2004 6:44:58 AM EST by fight4yourrights]
Try to open a combination dial lock when your fingers are cold, or you are filled with adrenaline. (think BG middle of the night)


Keypad is MUCH easier to operate in less than ideal conditions.



Originally Posted By Garand1911:
ask the safe dealer this question ..... what if a burglar breaks into your house and finds your electronic locked safe, then takes a hammer and beats the fuck out of the keypad trying to open it, how do YOU open the safe or get the keypad replaced?


fire is another issue, with the keypad melting




I did. Not a problem - Canon will take care of me.


Now, ask your safe dealer what you do when the numbers are burned off the dial, or it's mashed by a hammer.
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 6:54:26 AM EST
Electric and don't set a number sequence set a keypad pattern that you can touch in the dark, i don't even know my safe combo, to me it is just a pattern that i can do in the dark, it is much faster to access than a combo, If there is an EMP you got much bigger problems, or just make a led sheild to go over it, JK
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 7:14:43 AM EST
Dial
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 7:16:54 AM EST
How about a poll for this topic? For those of us who don't want to wade through the yadda yadda yadda.

I'm for the ease of electronic. I fucking hate dials after using them for so long in .mil.

That or hire a rent-a-cop to stand guard over your gun storage room.

Odds are, the average intruder/burglar is going to see that and keep moving. I don't think the majority of them enter every home with safe-cracking tools/skills, unless they have been doing some serious obsveration or have made a couple trips to see what they're up against. The average crackhead breaking in to steal your DVD player isn't gonna screw with a vault.
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 7:28:53 AM EST
I go with the Dial....I always preset my dial to a point that I just turn it in a few click and open. Bad guys will never know what few clicks are and which way? right or left?


Link Posted: 8/2/2004 7:38:23 AM EST
I've got dials...

I'm not sure what all the hub-bub is about quick access. A safe is protective storage. If you don't have kids, keep the go to gun(s) available, and if you do have kids, get one of those bedside quick access models whose only purpose is to keep tiny fingers off.

Link Posted: 8/2/2004 9:15:16 AM EST
I'm not ready to buy a large safe yet, but I've been thinking about it for a while. I'm leaning towards the electronic lock. I'd probably be in and out of it at least six times a day and the dial would get extremely annoying. It would be extremely tempting to open it, grab something, and just close the door without locking it until I put the gun back a little while later. I know it's just a matter of discipline and establishing good habits, but I know I'd think "I hate this damn lock" every time I opened it.
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 4:46:40 PM EST
I called the manufacturer, Zonatti today to talk about it with them. They said in the 17 years he's been selling safes, he's only had 2 electronic locks go bad. I didn't ask him how many dials he's had gone bad.

The safe has lifetime warranty against fire/burglary....

I think I'm sort of leaning towards dial, but those buttons sure are tempting....
Link Posted: 8/2/2004 5:23:31 PM EST


I have a 6 number electronic.. 2 plus years, same battery.. opens fast, with my eyes
closed, no problem. I wouldnt have it any other way..

Electronic..
Link Posted: 8/18/2004 7:20:10 PM EST
As an update to this...

I did order a Zonatti Armor ZA-II this week. Although I really wanted the eletronic lock, I went for the dial combo + key. I want this to be a safe to last me my lifetime, and I didn't think an electronic device would last 30-40 years.
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