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Posted: 5/19/2005 1:04:14 PM EDT
So technically the '94 AWB "expired" .... but is there a trend starting ?

Could H.R. 1703 be the next form of gun law reformation ?

If so then that would pretty much kill the whole '89 executive order...

What next, the '86 Firearms Owners' Protection Act ?

Then maybe the '68 Gun Control Act ?

And finally the most important, complete destruction of the 1934 National Firearms Act ?

If you say no to all of the above, then how about progressive gun law reform without killing the "Acts" already in place ?

Most are not likely, but doesn't it seem as if gun owners are gaining ground or am I just having a nice daydream

Just thinking outloud...
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 1:08:55 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 1:10:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By shotar:
You really don't want the whole 86 law repealed unless you want to start showing ID and having each ammo purchase recorded as you take delivery in person.

Yes, people should say they want 18 USC 922(o) repealed, not the whole FOPA.
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 1:12:06 PM EDT

Originally Posted By shotar:
You really don't want the whole 86 law repealed unless you want to start showing ID and having each ammo purchase recorded as you take delivery in person.



Ok, then just the amendment to the '86 Act that involves machine guns, I should have been more specific.

I'm thinking reform would be better than repealing anyway
Link Posted: 5/19/2005 2:27:33 PM EDT
What next, the '86 Firearms Owners' Protection Act ?

The '86 FOPA, aka McClure-Volkmer bill, had a lot of good. People criticized the NRA for asking Reagan to sign it even with the poison pill machine gun ban.

The FOPA supposedly protected travelers going through restrictive jurisdictions, such as NY or Chicago. There are still problems there. But imagine a person having to drive through a restrictive state to go hunting or to a match. If discovered, he could end up in jail for a very long time.

Before FOPA, each time you purchased ammo, you had to show ID, and sign a register. That had your ID info, such as driver's license number, name, address. This was available to police upon demand. I am not sure whether some localities sent in copies on a regular basis or not.

But that was really nice, if you purchased, for example, .38 Super ammo, and someone was shot with that, you could expect to be questioned. Something common like .38 Special, .22 LR, where would you start? But it was a tremendous PITA. PLUS no mail order. You could not call up the equivilent of an Ammoman or Natchez Shooter's Supply and have them send you a case or even a box of ammo. You had to buy all ammo face to face in a store.

Contrast this, which affected a lot of people, to the machine gun ban, which was not part of the original bill, but added by the shenanigans of the Democratic party, a true conspiracy in this act, added and gaveled in at the last moment on a very questionable voice vote. That affected very few people, and the NRA felt the good far outweighed the bad. I have to agree.

Now California looks to be headed to "ammo registration" again. It did not work the first time, and won't this time, but don't let that get in the way of the true believers in gun control.

If we can get GCA '68 amended to remove the "sporting purposes", remove the OPINION of what is and is not sporting from the jurisdiction of the government, we will go a long way to restoring the rights of all Americans.
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