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Posted: 8/5/2002 10:21:39 AM EST
Which accoustic guitar would you recommend for a guy who has never played a musical instrument in his life but suddenly decides he wants to learn to play the guitar. I plan on trying to learn using an instructional DVD of some sort. Sam's club has this...good price... [url]http://www.samsclub.com/eclub/main_shopping.jsp?mt=a&n=0&BV_SessionID=_SC_1732601259.1028573331_CS_&BV_EngineID=ccdhadcflifjehdcfkfcfkjdgoodflf.0&coe=0&oidPath=0%3a-15278%3a-16121%3a665575[/url] But I guess I'd be willing to spend a little more...like up to $150. Can a decent guitar even be had on such a budget? Thanks!
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:33:32 AM EST
Zippy, A $90 Chinese guitar would probably give you more headache than anything else. I'd be willing to bet you'd have cheap tuning keys (meaning the thing would never stay in tune) and a really high action. The action is the height of the strings off the fretboard. As a result, your fingertips would constantly feel like they'd been dragged across rough concrete at 100 m.p.h. from having to push the stings down with excessive force. Let me do some surfing around and see if I can find anything better for you. E-95
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:36:03 AM EST
I'm not familiar with that brand/model. My suggestion would be to find a music store around you, maybe a Guitar Center or Sam Ash, something with a large variety of models. Try a few out. If the guitar is too difficult to play; the action is too high and requires too much left hand strength (I'm assuming your a righty) you may give up on it. I've seen it happen. As far as buying a guitar over the internet without seeing it, be careful. I myself would not buy a guitar without playing it first. I think that the $150 you quoted is more realistic for a playable instrument. You might want to consider an inexpensive electric guitar. They are usually easier to play due to the close string placement to the fretboard.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:45:55 AM EST
careful buying a cheap guitar. you should look at the local music stores/pawn shops and find a good used one. Fender makes a great electric acoustic that looks like a stratocaster but is hollow like an acoustic. neck feels very much like an electric. very easy to play. a great beginners guitar. brad
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:48:32 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 10:52:28 AM EST by Benjamin0001]
Any Acoustic in the 400-500$ price range is an exellent starter guitar. As it is not so cheap as to be unplayable (really) but not so expensive that you would be wasting your money on something you won't know how to make sound good anyways. Ovation makes great guitars for starters. And the right price. They are available from most any guitar shop. Take lessons, they are cheap usually around $14.00-20.00 / hour and will provide a strong foundation to develop your knowledge, fingers, and ears. [img]http://www.ovationguitars.com/pics/models/CU147.jpg[/img] [url]http://www.ovationguitars.com/?fa=detail&mid=361#[/url] A truly cheap guitar will be a mess and in my opinion will discourage you from playing, as it will take 6 months to develop the finger strength necessary just to get it to sound solidly. The ovation is quite a bit nimbler, the strings lay closer to the fret board and this allows you to concentrate on things other than your cut and bleeding fingers. The ovation sounds very very nice and is not too bassy and not to much treble, the curved sound box has a very good midrange tone and is just as mellow as hell. My honest opnion. Ben
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:49:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 10:52:16 AM EST by Engineer]
You don't have to spend a fortune on guitars, but don't buy any of those cheap no-name brand guitars. Like E-95 said, those are some of the problems with cheapie guitars not to mention that intonation could be off. You would be better served getting a Yamaha or a Takamine as a starter guitar. For a little more money, look into the Seagull brand or even a Taylor Big Baby. The starter Yamaha's and Tak's can be had for around $200. The advantage of getting a nicer guitar is that you will be able to sell it off without taking that much of a hit if you decide not to like it (think Lorcin vs. Ruger). Also, you'll have to budget another $50 in for accessories (chromatic tuner, picks, stand, strap). The best thing to do is to bring someone with you who knows about guitars - you might be able to find a nice used one that has a couple of dings and dents, but otherwise plays and sounds great. Guns and guitars .... I think I need to get some cheaper hobbies. [img]http://home.cwru.edu/~eyw/ac_guit.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:50:25 AM EST
One word: Washburn. Go to the nearest Mars Music and ask to play a Washburn D10. They aren't the greatest, but I have played some that were better than the price tag should have allowed. Play a couple of them and pick the one with the richest tone. Fender does make on ein that price range, but I have no experience with it. A used one would not be bad either, but it would be hard for a beginner to know what to look for when buying a used guitar.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:53:04 AM EST
Originally Posted By E-95: Zippy, A $90 Chinese guitar would probably give you more headache than anything else. I'd be willing to bet you'd have cheap tuning keys (meaning the thing would never stay in tune) and a really high action. The action is the height of the strings off the fretboard. As a result, your fingertips would constantly feel like they'd been dragged across rough concrete at 100 m.p.h. from having to push the stings down with excessive force. Let me do some surfing around and see if I can find anything better for you. E-95
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Yo, guy my grandson wants a elec. guitar what do you suggest, cheap and good he is young, Thanks in advance.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 10:58:28 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 11:00:52 AM EST by Green_Furniture]
As far as budget acoustics go, you can find decent ones for less than $250 at Musician's Friend. Look for a guitar with a solid spruce or cedar top and solid wood (mahogony, rosewood, cedar, maple) sides and back. Takemine and Yamaha both make outstanding "starter" guitars. On the electic front, Mexican Fenders are always a safe bet. They start around $300 at any Guitar Center or Musician's Friend. Then again, you can always get a better deal on a higher end used guitar. Get familiar with the brands and models and then wheel and deal at a local ma&pa store or eBay.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:00:24 AM EST
Zippy, If you've got a limited budget, you might want to try one of these as a starter guitar: [url=http://www.guitartrader.com/itempg.icl?orderidentifier=ID10285764629785461417C6C2412&secid=1022&subsecid=1135&catid=1152&dirpage=dir3&itmid=30810&eflag=0&curitempos=2&numitems=6]Fender Squire SD-6[/url] [url=http://www.guitartrader.com/itempg.icl?orderidentifier=ID10285764629785461417C6C2412&secid=1022&subsecid=1135&catid=1152&dirpage=dir3&itmid=26589&eflag=0&curitempos=4&numitems=6]Fender Squire SD-7[/url] I'd definately try any instrument choice out at a local music store before trying to find a good price on the web. And try to stick with recognizable names like Fender, Gibson, Ovation, Takamine, and Guild or their subsidiaries. Good luck. E-95
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:03:29 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 11:08:28 AM EST by GodBlessTexas]
I've been playing for about 15 years now, and crappy instruments almost caused my to give it up quickly. If you're going to get started, and don't want to find yourself frustrated all the time because you don't sound good, pay the money for a good instrument. Good acoustics are expensive. The best advice I can give you in that department is to look for a used Tacoma acoustic. They have a tone that rivals many $2-4K Martin and Gibson acoustics at a pricetag of around $600. Granted, that's a huge investment for something you just plan on starting off with, but you will not ever be unhappy with the guitar's ability. However, that's way out of your price range, so as others have suggested, look for a good Yamaha or Takamine beginner guitar. Be very careful about buying guitars used at places like pawnshops. Most of them carry instruments that have been abused and poorly maintained because the pawn staff doesn't know anything about them beyond what the book tells them to lend for certain models. So you end up with warped necks, cracked bodies, and other problems. The first guitar I ever bought was an Ovation acoustic made in the 1970's. It was a great guitar until the frets on the neck wore down at the first three, which is where most beginner chords are played. Turns out, the frets were aluminum. What was worse, the whole neck was aluminum, and the frets were machined out of the aluminum stock, not inlayed like they would be on a wood neck. That meant they could not be replaced, and therefore the guitar was worthless. And if you want good tone from any guitar, always buy good strings. I find that Elixer acoustic strinks are great. They last a long time and have great tone. I'd suggest buying lighter gauge strings until you build up caluses and and finger/hand strength. I second Deliverator's comments of buying a cheap electric guitar. You can pick up a Fender made Squier stratocaster for around $100 every time Guitar Center puts them on-sale, and they are not bad guitars at all. But buying an electic is a tradeoff, as you'll need to buy an amp, and it's very hard to get good tone out of an amp that is less than $200. However, there are things like "modeling amps" and effects units that can get some really great tones at decent prices, but they can be complicated to understand for the beginner. Examples are the Line 6 POD, Johnson J-Station, Digitech RP-100, RP-200 and RP-300, BOSS ME-33, and Toneworks AX100G. Good luck with your playing. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:07:41 AM EST
As far as learning to play from a dvd. That is alright as long as it teaches you good hand position. I have learned the hard way, Bad habits die hard. Its exciting to feel yourself master something new. You will watch yourself grow. Your sound will get progressively clearer and stronger, you will find out just how subtle a finger can actually be. how just something so unimaginable as a slight adjustment in pressure on the string can totally change the mood of what you are playing. You can make a note sound sad, or happy, or snappy or down right Angry, suspense, agony, hope, blissful, any emotion can come through on a guitar. You have entered a new world, one that you can spend a lifetime learning about. Good luck. ben
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:12:08 AM EST
Originally Posted By bountyhunter:
Originally Posted By E-95: Zippy, A $90 Chinese guitar would probably give you more headache than anything else. I'd be willing to bet you'd have cheap tuning keys (meaning the thing would never stay in tune) and a really high action. The action is the height of the strings off the fretboard. As a result, your fingertips would constantly feel like they'd been dragged across rough concrete at 100 m.p.h. from having to push the stings down with excessive force. Let me do some surfing around and see if I can find anything better for you. E-95
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Yo, guy my grandson wants a elec. guitar what do you suggest, cheap and good he is young, Thanks in advance.
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It depends on how old he is (actually how big he is). For a 14-15 year old, or older, a Fender Squier can be had for about $100. It looks like a Fender Stratocaster but uses inexpensive wood and electronics. A great starter guitar though. For a younger or smaller child, some manufactures make a 3/4 size guitar. It is physically smaller and easier for a young person to handle.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:14:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By Rem_700: Fender makes a great electric acoustic that looks like a stratocaster but is hollow like an acoustic. neck feels very much like an electric. very easy to play. a great beginners guitar. brad
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I've played about 4 or 5 of those while hanging around Guitar Center at different times, and none of them ever had good tone. Of course, that could have been because their strings were almost black from use by all the sweaty handed kids, but I wasn't really impressed. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:16:45 AM EST
Originally Posted By Deliverator: It depends on how old he is (actually how big he is). For a 14-15 year old, or older, a Fender Squier can be had for about $100. It looks like a Fender Stratocaster but uses inexpensive wood and electronics. A great starter guitar though. For a younger or smaller child, some manufactures make a 3/4 size guitar. It is physically smaller and easier for a young person to handle.
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Yep, that's my take on it as well. For the money, there is no better starter electric than the Fender Squier. I've been playing for almost 15 years and I still consider picking one up just to have. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:22:37 AM EST
Guitar used to be my thing when I in high school. For a while, it was right up there with guns. Anyway, for starters, don't let anyone dissuade you from buying a "cheap" guitar. There is a company out of China who makes starter acoustic guitars that rival the tone of much more expensive boxes. I used to have a Yari Classical rig, an Ibanez hollowbody jazz setup, and a Jackson solid body electric. All I have now is a Takamine Solid Body Electric (Yes, they exist, and they are rare as hell, although not too expensive given the Takamine name) and my Yari. I started with a Seagull. They are OK. They have a solid wood top, and laminate sides and back. They run about $350 on up to about $3k depending on inlays and wood selection. Also, as far as learning, try and start from the beginning, and work your way up. The time invested in learning your scales and modes (and chords) is MUCH more valuable than spending a month learining how to stumble through "Classical Gas" without a solid technical foundation. (Trust me on this. I learned this lesson the hard way, and had to junk 2 years of practice because of it). I wound up getting very good there for a while, but I haven't played in about 2 years. Also, decide what you want to play. Chord Strumming? Easy. Power Chord Rock? Easy. Leo Kottke Acoustic Fingerstyle? Better plan on making this a hobby for the rest of your life. At the top, it's Classical, Fingerstyle and/or Jazz (Or fusions of said styles). This isn't to say that anyone who can do a refrainny jazz riff is better than Stevie Ray, just because he is playing Jazz... But when Guitar players graduate from the blues and rock, that's usually where they go. A bit off topic, but some advice I can offer from first hand experience.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:22:48 AM EST
Originally Posted By Deliverator:
Originally Posted By bountyhunter:
Originally Posted By E-95: Zippy, A $90 Chinese guitar would probably give you more headache than anything else. I'd be willing to bet you'd have cheap tuning keys (meaning the thing would never stay in tune) and a really high action. The action is the height of the strings off the fretboard. As a result, your fingertips would constantly feel like they'd been dragged across rough concrete at 100 m.p.h. from having to push the stings down with excessive force. Let me do some surfing around and see if I can find anything better for you. E-95
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Yo, guy my grandson wants a elec. guitar what do you suggest, cheap and good he is young, Thanks in advance.
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It depends on how old he is (actually how big he is). For a 14-15 year old, or older, a Fender Squier can be had for about $100. It looks like a Fender Stratocaster but uses inexpensive wood and electronics. A great starter guitar though. For a younger or smaller child, some manufactures make a 3/4 size guitar. It is physically smaller and easier for a young person to handle.
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Deliverator's right. I'd probably go with a lower priced Fender Stratocaster model: [url=http://www.guitartrader.com/itempg.icl?orderidentifier=ID102857837902376106D49E2462&secid=1021&subsecid=1136&catid=1101&dirpage=dir3&itmid=7887&eflag=0&curitempos=1&numitems=25]Fender Squire Strat[/url]. In the fickle world of teenage grandsons I wouldn't want to make a huge investment in something that could end up in the attic in 2 months. The price isn't bad and it's got 3 pickups so you can get a wider range of sound/tone quality out of it. E-95
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:31:05 AM EST
Of course, if you want to spend the kid's inheritance, there is nothing better. [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Green%5FFurniture%2FHoly%2520Grail%2Egif[/img]
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:41:59 AM EST
I think a 1981 hand-made BC Rich Eagle Supreme beats a Les Paul. [:)]
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:45:08 AM EST
Originally Posted By Deliverator: I think a 1981 hand-made BC Rich Eagle Supreme beats a Les Paul. [:)]
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You're either one of those people who try and talk up their shit with inflated adjectives, or your guitar salesman sold you a line of crap. BC Rich? Handmade? Well, I suppose "hands" are involved in the manufacture of any guitar, so I guess you could call your BC "handmade"...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:50:19 AM EST
A few years ago, I started playing again after 15 years off. I thought I would just get a cheapo guitar to practice with, then get a better one once I got my fingering back. Big mistake! Re-learing with the cheap guitar, was much harder than I remembered. After many hours of frustration I went to a music store and picked up a used Yamaha. It is not that great, but it fit into my budget. What a difference! I second the pawn shop idea, as there will definetely be something good within your budget. Musicians are always going broke and pawning off their instruments. See what the local music store has, but used guitars in good condition are a dime a dozen.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:51:00 AM EST
Great starter guitar. Fender Squire..my son started on one and has been so pleased he just had the strings lowered and some hot pickups (IMG's) put on...He's saving for a Gibson J200 next...Good luck in your search...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:51:29 AM EST
Actually in the early '80's they were hand-made. It is a neck-thru design, and I love it. I like Les Pauls too, but I think they are too heavy. Great tone though. I also have a Strat that I LOVE. I put in Kinman pickups, and when they advertised "noiseless", they weren't kidding. Great Strat tone as well.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:52:59 AM EST
My general impressions of Fender vs Gibson, I have owned both. Fender Longer scale length (25.5) means higher string tension, harder bending notes. Clearer tones due to single coil pickups and longer strings Better intonation all across the fretboard Gibson Shorter scale length (24.75) means lower string tension, easier bending notes. Higher output from humbucking pickups - easier to overdrive old tube amps but you won't get bell like tones from Gibsons. Thats all....
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 11:53:01 AM EST
BC Rich beating a Les Paul...Give it a few years and see whats worth more.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 12:04:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By mejames: A few years ago, I started playing again after 15 years off. I thought I would just get a cheapo guitar to practice with, then get a better one once I got my fingering back. Big mistake! Re-learing with the cheap guitar, was much harder than I remembered. After many hours of frustration I went to a music store and picked up a used Yamaha. It is not that great, but it fit into my budget. What a difference! I second the pawn shop idea, as there will definetely be something good within your budget. Musicians are always going broke and pawning off their instruments. See what the local music store has, but used guitars in good condition are a dime a dozen.
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Used is definately a way to get a better instrument for a cheaper price but I'd stick with a music store for your purchase. They know more about the care of an instrument than the guy down at the pawn shop. You might also see if there is a consignment music store in town. E-95
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 12:41:39 PM EST
DO NOT SPEND 500 on a guitar! If you are like I was, you had never played an instrument ever. There are PLENTY of good guitars for around 200 to 250. Until you actually play for a year or so and stick with it and make progress, then you can get a nicer guitar.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 12:54:33 PM EST
Danelectros are cheap, pretty decent tone. My only problem with them is they go out of tune too easily. But they sound ok, are about $150. If he doesn't take to it or loses interest, it wont hurt you too bad. For acoustic guitars, I was impressed how good Seagulls played and sounded, even though they're $300. They look like crap, but action and sound is more important.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 1:07:10 PM EST
I gotta agree that the best guitar to learn on would be an inexpensive electric with a small practice amplifier. Like a mexican Strat. Once you know what's up... Buy one of these! This is just like mine, but mine is sunburst with chrome hardware. [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/No4MK1%2FASAT%2DSPECIAL%2Ejpg[/img] Cheers, Chris
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 1:22:36 PM EST
I would agree that mid-70s to mid-80s BC Riches are better than the Norlin era Les Pauls. However, the Les Paul in my post is one I fought hard to find. It's of a slightly older vintage. I think [b][i]Eisenhower[/i][/b] was President on the day that one left Kalamazoo.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 1:40:14 PM EST
I HIGHLY recommend you check out seagull guitars if you're looking for a great beginners acoustic guitar. Here is what a search on the rec.music.makers.guitar.acoustic produces: [url]http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&lr=&ie=ISO-8859-1&safe=off&q=seagull+beginner+group%3Arec.music.makers.guitar.acoustic[/url] Lots of guitar nuts, raving about seagulls for beginners. They're made by a canadian company, [url]www.lasido.com[/url] and have solid wood tops, so they actually sound better the more you use them (unlike asian plywood junk). Check em out, you won't be sorry.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 1:47:34 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 1:47:54 PM EST by agtm]
Btw, their electric guitar department (godin guitars) also does fine work. Like this: [img]http://home.wi.rr.com/antigov/guitar1.JPG[/img]
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 2:00:48 PM EST
Don't spend a lot of money. You may decide it's too much work, you don't have the time, or playing music is not for you. Get a cheap acoustic, up to $150 like you said. I probably would not get a classical guitar, not yet, just a standard steel string acoustic. After 6 months, if you progress and decide you like it, you may want to upgrade. As far as acoustics, I have not really found anything I like for under $700. Same with electrics. Electrics are not the best way to learn. You want an acoustic because it builds strength in your hands and forearms and if you ever take lessons, your instructor will probably insist you use an acoustic.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 2:07:09 PM EST
I just picked up a first guitar for my son(he's 11). I've been playing since I was his age, and at 36 I've had more than my share of guitars, cheap and otherwise. I've also taught more than a few people of various ages to play. In a first guitar it all comes down to what I call playability. In other words besides low priced, a good first guitar should play easily and stay in tune. Many music shops can help you out with this by making sure whatever you choose for a guitar is set up for a beginner(low action and light gauge strings). I also have to agree the way to is an electric. They're easier to play, you can crank em up real loud with even a cheap amp, they're real quiet without one(you won't annoy anyone other than yourself when learning to play, or at 3am when you can't sleep)and because of the way a solid body electric is made, they're almost always a better guitar for the same money. Hollow bodies and acoustics are harder to build, so a good one will cost more. Be careful of mail-order stuff. I ended up buying my son a Squire Bullet. The music store that I buy most of my stuff at had 10 of them, all just alike. The owner let me play all of them until I narrowed it down to 2 or 3, from there I let my son choose. My band plays at least 3 weekend a month, and just for the hell of it, the other night I took the bullet along and played it for 2 sets. It stayed in tune great. So far,it's the best $100 I've ever spent, and to tell the truth I don't even like Fenders all that much. The moral to my story is this, Find someone that plays well and knows guitars. Take them with you, and let them weed out the junk. There are a lot of low priced, pretty guitars that aren't worth having. Remember, I played 10 $100 guitars before finding 2 or 3 good ones.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 2:13:58 PM EST
[img]http://www.peavey.com/evhcustomshop/vault/picts/oceanbluecusdellg.jpg[/img] [img]http://www.marshallamps.com/images/products/vintage/images/1959slpunit.jpg[/img] Is there anything else??
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 2:52:41 PM EST
Well, I went with a Takemine g-230...mostly on the advice from the kid working there. Look out Kottke....here I come...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 2:57:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By Benjamin0001: Is there anything else??
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Uh.........yeah, [img]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Green%5FFurniture%2FTeleandbassman%2EJPG[/img]
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 3:34:40 PM EST
i've been playing guitar for 14 years and i can tell you from advice that playing electric is easier. if you want to play acoustic, the best thing to do is go to music stores and pick one up and play until you find one that plays easy...you won't necessarily have to spend alot of money
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 3:42:41 PM EST
Originally Posted By Green_Furniture:
Originally Posted By Benjamin0001: Is there anything else??
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Uh.........yeah, [url]www.ar15.com/members/albums/Green%5FFurniture%2FTeleandbassman%2EJPG[/url]
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[img]http://www.guitarsessions.com/aug02/luthier/C1.jpg[/img] [img]http://www.raezers-edge.com/images/1-stealth12.jpg[/img] [img]http://www.gruhn.com/features/benmanhat/AR3573ang.jpg[/img]
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 4:02:09 PM EST
Originally Posted By Green_Furniture: I would agree that mid-70s to mid-80s BC Riches are better than the Norlin era Les Pauls. However, the Les Paul in my post is one I fought hard to find. It's of a slightly older vintage. I think [b][i]Eisenhower[/i][/b] was President on the day that one left Kalamazoo.
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Hi GreenFurnitue: Whether it's a Les Paul, BC Rich, Strat, or a sunburst ES-336 (a smallish 335). What ever feels good is probably what you will play best. I definitely drool over the Les Pauls in the local Guitar Center and Sam Ash stores. Yours looks very nice with the flame in the wood and the trapezoid fret inlays. I love the binding on Les Pauls as well. Well made, solid, and sustain forever. Several friends have them, and we always chide each other as to whos' is best. That's all I was doing with you. Definitely nothing personal. Sorry if it looked that way. Any way, my Strat is a Mexican. It has the best action I have ever played. Even though it is inexpensive, I would not trade or sell it for anything. It's named "Keeper".
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 5:04:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By ECS: My general impressions of Fender vs Gibson, I have owned both. Fender Longer scale length (25.5) means higher string tension, harder bending notes.
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This doesn't exactly apply to a Fender Strat style, as the bridge is not fixed, making it easier to bend notes than on a fixed bridge Gibson. I owned a Gibson SG, and played more than a few Strats to make that comparison. On a side note, a fixed bridge will stay in tune better than a tremelo bridge.
Clearer tones due to single coil pickups and longer strings
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I agree with that. Fender tones are heavenly on the clean side, and with a Tube Screamer they can be mighty hot yet still clear and bright. You won't get those kind of tones from any humbucker, and I went through a few trying to do it.
Gibson Shorter scale length (24.75) means lower string tension, easier bending notes.
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Not necessarily, see above.
Higher output from humbucking pickups - easier to overdrive old tube amps but you won't get bell like tones from Gibsons.
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Agreed. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 5:11:07 PM EST
I'm in the same position as the original poster.Just one question for you all.If a guy wants to learn how too play guitar and has no idea where to begin,how the hell is he suppossed too walk into a store and "play a few"?He doesn't know how too play ,thats the whole point?Right?
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 5:13:44 PM EST
Originally Posted By mattja: As far as acoustics, I have not really found anything I like for under $700. Same with electrics.
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Have you tried any of the Tacoma line? I've been lusting after a Gibson Jumbo for the last 5 years or so, and on a whim stopped by Guitar Center on my lunch break. I went back to the expensive acoustic room, and played around on a few, including the jumbo. Then I looked on the opposite wall and noticed a few Tacomas, which I had never heard. So, I played a few, and was amazed at how great they sounded. Then when I looked at the pricetag, the one I was playing was only $599, which generally isn't found in the back acoustic room at Guitar Center. I put it on lay away and picked it up the following weekend. It has a beautiful sound, comparable or better than the $2k+ Gibsons and Martins hangin on the wall next to it. For the money, they are quite bossibly the best acoustic guitar you can buy. I still want that Gibson Jumbo though. [:D] Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 5:16:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By raven: Danelectros are cheap, pretty decent tone. My only problem with them is they go out of tune too easily. But they sound ok, are about $150. If he doesn't take to it or loses interest, it wont hurt you too bad.
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The action on any of the stock one's I've played have been way too high for a beginner. If you do go with a Danelectro, make sure the place you buy it from lowers the action to something more suitable for a beginner and checks the intonation before you walk out the door. Remember the Alamo, and God Bless Texas...
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 6:06:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 6:10:36 PM EST by Engineer]
Originally Posted By byron2112: I'm in the same position as the original poster.Just one question for you all.If a guy wants to learn how too play guitar and has no idea where to begin,how the hell is he suppossed too walk into a store and "play a few"?He doesn't know how too play ,thats the whole point?Right?
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The best way would be to bring a friend that plays and have him or her pick out a few for you. I've found employee's at both the small shops and the megastores willing to blow sunshine up your ass to sell you a guitar that is totally wrong for you (but chances are better that you well get someone who actually knows something and is willing to spend some time with you at a smaller store). There are differences that you can narrow down right away without being a player. One of which is body shape - you have to see which one fits you best (and which one produces the tone you like the best). Then there are differences such as nut width, scale length and neck shape that affect how the guitar feels in your hand and how it plays. Again, you'll have to get a guitar in your hands to feel how it works for you. For example, Segaull's nut widths tend to be wider than a Martin (1.8" vs. 1.6875") and you can see and feel the difference. If you have a price point to stick to, pick some guitars within the range and try them to see how they feel in your hand. Then ask the salesman to play it a little and see how it sounds to you. Not everyone going in there is a pro and they've dealt with new people in the past. Best bet is still to bring an experienced guitarist with you though - because then they can also help you shop used guitars as well - and there could be some good deals there.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 6:12:27 PM EST
Originally Posted By Engineer:
Originally Posted By byron2112: I'm in the same position as the original poster.Just one question for you all.If a guy wants to learn how too play guitar and has no idea where to begin,how the hell is he suppossed too walk into a store and "play a few"?He doesn't know how too play ,thats the whole point?Right?
View Quote
The best way would be to bring a friend that plays and have him or her pick out a few for you. I've found employee's at both the small shops and the megastores willing to blow sunshine up your ass to sell you a guitar that is totally wrong for you (but chances are better that you well get someone who actually knows something and is willing to spend some time with you at a smaller store). There are differences that you can narrow down right away without being a player. One of which is body shape - you have to see which one fits you best (and which one produces the tone you like the best). Then there are differences such as nut width, scale length and neck shape that affect how the guitar feels in your hand and how it plays. Again, you'll have to get a guitar in your hands to feel how it works for you. For example, Segaull's nut widths tend to be wider than a Martin (1.8" vs. 1.6875") and you can see and feel the difference. If you have a price point to stick to, pick some guitars within the range and try them to see how they feel in your hand. Then ask the salesman to play it a little and see how it sounds to you. Not everyone going in there is a pro and they've dealt with new people in the past. Best bet is still to bring an experienced guitarist with you though - because then they can also help you shop used guitars as well - and there could be some good deals there.
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Also, if you can't find or don't have a friend who can play to bring along, just hang out in the store until some dude comes in and starts playing the heck out of a guitar off of the wall, then see if you can get him to play a few for you and help you pick one out.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 6:43:02 PM EST
That Benedetto is nice. I have a buddy at Berklee that just brought one home, sweeeeet!
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 6:52:21 PM EST
Do yourself a favor and do NOT buy a cheap guitar. Buy a GOOD "used" guitar in decent shape. Expect to pay around $300. If you buy a good guitar, it will sound good and keep your interest. If you buy used, you get quality for less $. If you get good at playing, you will not need to buy another guitar for a long time, unless you are a Les Paul slut like me and need a different one for every day of the week...LOL If you find you do not like to play guitar, you can always resell it and not lose any money on it. Stay away from brands you haven't heard of. If you find something you like, post in here with details and you WILL get feedback.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 7:00:52 PM EST
Originally Posted By Engineer:
Originally Posted By byron2112: I'm in the same position as the original poster.Just one question for you all.If a guy wants to learn how too play guitar and has no idea where to begin,how the hell is he suppossed too walk into a store and "play a few"?He doesn't know how too play ,thats the whole point?Right?
View Quote
The best way would be to bring a friend that plays and have him or her pick out a few for you. Best bet is still to bring an experienced guitarist with you though - because then they can also help you shop used guitars as well - and there could be some good deals there.
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Very good advice. My brother was in the market for a guitar while I was away at college, wanted buying advice. I knew he wouldn't know a good tone if he heard it, so I just told him "Get one that feels nice and is easy on your fingers when you play it." He bought a $700 special edition Ovation which has the nastiest, harshest action I've ever felt on an acoustic guitar that expensive. I hate that thing. Unless you've got experience, you wont know what a good guitar for you is, and in my brother's case, price wasn't an indicator either.
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 7:37:36 PM EST
Originally Posted By Green_Furniture: That Benedetto is nice. I have a buddy at Berklee that just brought one home, sweeeeet!
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lucky friend wish I had the green for one of those babies (even though I'd probably be ashamed of playing one with my pitiful ability) i like my godin a lot, but it's a 2x4 compared to one of those
Link Posted: 8/5/2002 7:38:51 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/5/2002 8:14:20 PM EST by prk]
An experienced player can make even a lousy guitar sound amazingly well. A beginner will get extreemely frustrated with the same guitar. You want something that will reward you when you do it right. I made a big mistake with my first one (crap) because I wanted (I thought) something cheap. I got a ways with it, but then when I sold my old truck and used all the money on a Yamaha, that's when I really started enjoying it. As long as the beginner has a good enough guitar to make playing enjoyable, they will move ahead. Once you have a decent one, you can forget about blaming the equipment [:D] Eventually there will be other dissatisfactions - like on this Squier the machine heads for tuning are pretty sloppy. Also I'm having a problem with string length, now that I know its effect, even after running out of adjustment on the bridge. Oh yeah, the Strat-type bridge makes tuning and re-stringing lots of fun. Sure I could go for a better guitar, maybe I will, but there still plenty of room for learning on this one. The idea of taking a friend to the store is a good one - to help separate out the lousy ones.
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