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Posted: 4/27/2015 10:58:05 AM EDT
A little hint:

This is a part from a US military rifle. Breakage of this part is fairly common and they are unobtainium. So, a friend asked me to reproduce a couple of them, going off of an original he had borrowed.

This is the original and my reproduction (before heat treat).  Notice the "teeth" of the original are gone. This is common as well as breaking in the middle.
</a>" />

First, a part print was made (not shown). Then the blank is figured. Notice the form at the bottom of the blank is not machined. This area is left long so the length can be determined after a test piece is bent. It's kind of cheating but, for a one off, it's the quickest way.
</a>" />

Then, a fixture print is sketched. (not shown) This is the blank, in the fixture. A test piece has already been bent and the length for the contoured part has been established. The fixture is used to hold the part to machine this feature.
</a>" />

This is the first bend. The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture. This is 1074 steel which is very forgiving with very little "spring back". That means no over bend is really needed.
</a>" />

This is the second bend.
</a>" />

This is what the blank looks like after completing all operations on that fixture.
</a>" />

Yet to show is the finishing of the enclosed loop, the dimpling of the hole and the bending of the "arm" to the odd angle and heat treat (of which I didn't get any pics cause I was holding a torch and the part. )

I'll try to get those posted tonight. Photobucket and my phone take forever to upload pics.

So, who's got a guess what it goes to?

ETA: I know the one corner is much sharper than the original. I have modified my blank print and the next one will be precisely identical to the original bend.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:00:49 AM EDT
[#1]
Shot in the dark. M3 grease gun.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:01:39 AM EDT
[#2]
damn, I feel pretty confident on most military issued weapons today.  But I got no idea
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:03:13 AM EDT
[#3]
M1 carbine? Not sure I can name the part.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:03:25 AM EDT
[#4]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
damn, I feel pretty confident on most military issued weapons today.  But I got no idea
View Quote


It is a little obscure because it's an odd part.

One more hint. .30-06
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:05:08 AM EDT
[#5]
I keep wanting to say it's a sling mount or something that mounts on a stock because of the teeth, but it just doesn't make sense with the shape.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:05:09 AM EDT
[#6]
M1919, keep it going if I got it right. It was a guess based on the drawing, not the part.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:06:16 AM EDT
[#7]
That's the clip that holds the throttle cable to my lawn mower
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:06:17 AM EDT
[#8]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


It is a little obscure because it's an odd part.

One more hint. .30-06
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Quoted:
Quoted:
damn, I feel pretty confident on most military issued weapons today.  But I got no idea


It is a little obscure because it's an odd part.

One more hint. .30-06



M1903
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:08:14 AM EDT
[#9]
Your handwriting is as shitty as mine is. I'm so glad I didn't have to do board drafting lol. YAY CAD!
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:08:18 AM EDT
[#10]
Could be part of a Johnson, because I would have no clue about it in that case.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:08:32 AM EDT
[#11]
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Quoted:



M1903
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
damn, I feel pretty confident on most military issued weapons today.  But I got no idea


It is a little obscure because it's an odd part.

One more hint. .30-06



M1903


Nope. Later.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:08:38 AM EDT
[#12]

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Quoted:
M1903
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

damn, I feel pretty confident on most military issued weapons today.  But I got no idea




It is a little obscure because it's an odd part.



One more hint. .30-06






M1903




 
Yep, it's a dickfer.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:08:50 AM EDT
[#13]
Johnson?
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:08:51 AM EDT
[#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Could be part of a Johnson, because I would have no clue about it in that case.
View Quote

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:10:59 AM EDT
[#15]
Part of a grenade launcher sight?
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:11:39 AM EDT
[#16]
Is it part of the Johnson Magazine Follower assembly?
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:13:38 AM EDT
[#17]
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Quoted:
Johnson?
View Quote


Yep.

Clips on the forestock and retains the retaining pin that holds basically the front of the rifle on. It doesn't show this part in the diagram but it retains part 187x. It fits inside the forearm behind the number 324.

The little ear on 187x slides under the curved part of my part.

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:14:04 AM EDT
[#18]
The little thingy next to the magazine below the ejection port?

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:15:38 AM EDT
[#19]
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Quoted:

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Quoted:
Quoted:
Could be part of a Johnson, because I would have no clue about it in that case.



More interesting is the BOLT on the Johnson;  anyone have a close up of it?  



Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:16:09 AM EDT
[#20]
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Quoted:
Your handwriting is as shitty as mine is. I'm so glad I didn't have to do board drafting lol. YAY CAD!
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I'm neat when necessary. Ain't got no time fo dat when doing a one off. I'm the only one who needs to understand it. You should see the part print and the fixture concept sketch.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:17:18 AM EDT
[#21]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Yep.

Clips on the forestock and retains the retaining pin that holds basically the front of the rifle on. It doesn't show this part in the diagram but it retains part 187x. It fits inside the forearm behind the number 324.

The little ear on 187x slides under the curved part of my part.

[url=https://www.gunandgame.com/attachments/johnson_semi-auto1941_schem-jpg.50113/]https://www.gunandgame.com/attachments/johnson_semi-auto1941_schem-jpg.50113/[/url]
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Johnson?


Yep.

Clips on the forestock and retains the retaining pin that holds basically the front of the rifle on. It doesn't show this part in the diagram but it retains part 187x. It fits inside the forearm behind the number 324.

The little ear on 187x slides under the curved part of my part.

[url=https://www.gunandgame.com/attachments/johnson_semi-auto1941_schem-jpg.50113/]https://www.gunandgame.com/attachments/johnson_semi-auto1941_schem-jpg.50113/[/url]



Well there you go.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:23:39 AM EDT
[#22]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


More interesting is the BOLT on the Johnson;  anyone have a close up of it?  



http://www.gunpartscorp.com/pub/schematic/Johnson_Semi-Auto1941_schem.jpg
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Could be part of a Johnson, because I would have no clue about it in that case.



More interesting is the BOLT on the Johnson;  anyone have a close up of it?  



http://www.gunpartscorp.com/pub/schematic/Johnson_Semi-Auto1941_schem.jpg



Hmm. They don't show it on yours, either. I think the diagram drawers just considered it part of the stock. Same alike they didn't draw the butt plate separately. It's meant to be shoved on the stock and left permanently (hence the little teeth).
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:28:52 AM EDT
[#23]

Quoted:


A little hint:



This is a part from a US military rifle. Breakage of this part is fairly common and they are unobtainium. So, a friend asked me to reproduce a couple of them, going off of an original he had borrowed.



This is the original and my reproduction (before heat treat).  Notice the "teeth" of the original are gone. This is common as well as breaking in the middle.

http://<a href=http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u660/ridgerunner9876/IMG_20150331_1339548081_zpsyqbxujof.jpg</a>" />



First, a part print was made (not shown). Then the blank is figured. Notice the form at the bottom of the blank is not machined. This area is left long so the length can be determined after a test piece is bent. It's kind of cheating but, for a one off, it's the quickest way.

http://<a href=http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u660/ridgerunner9876/IMG_20150325_1530446291_zpspyfqyup8.jpg</a>" />



Then, a fixture print is sketched. (not shown) This is the blank, in the fixture. A test piece has already been bent and the length for the contoured part has been established. The fixture is used to hold the part to machine this feature.

http://<a href=http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u660/ridgerunner9876/IMG_20150330_1404206281_zpstztpipwa.jpg</a>" />



This is the first bend. The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture. This is 1074 steel which is very forgiving with very little "spring back". That means no over bend is really needed.

http://<a href=http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u660/ridgerunner9876/IMG_20150330_1509081721_zpsgwb3pein.jpg</a>" />



This is the second bend.

http://<a href=http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u660/ridgerunner9876/IMG_20150331_0917285461_zps9odacu3b.jpg</a>" />



This is what the blank looks like after completing all operations on that fixture.

http://<a href=http://i1326.photobucket.com/albums/u660/ridgerunner9876/IMG_20150331_0921009371_zpsempsv0yb.jpg</a>" />



Yet to show is the finishing of the enclosed loop, the dimpling of the hole and the bending of the "arm" to the odd angle and heat treat (of which I didn't get any pics cause I was holding a torch and the part. )



I'll try to get those posted tonight. Photobucket and my phone take forever to upload pics.



So, who's got a guess what it goes to?



ETA: I know the one corner is much sharper than the original. I have modified my blank print and the next one will be precisely identical to the original bend.
View Quote
No idea, but you clearly know your shit.

 
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:32:31 AM EDT
[#24]
Here is a picture of a johnson. Is any part of your part exposed?

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:37:27 AM EDT
[#25]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Here is a picture of a johnson. Is any part of your part exposed?

http://i1347.photobucket.com/albums/p712/waterglasss/johnson_zpsxwz3so1w.jpg
View Quote


See the little lever just underneath and in front of the charging handle and the round thing that it's under. My part is the round thing that retains the clip that is attached to a pin.

I guess I was misremembering exactly how it fit in the forestock. But it's grabbing wood there with the teeth you saw in the first pic.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:37:53 AM EDT
[#26]


damn it my photobucket aint working right. But yeah I know what you mean. I had a time figuring out what you were talking about because the diagram was missing part of the assembly.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:40:25 AM EDT
[#27]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History


I don't have a way to put circles and arrows on the pic. It's the part you see just in front of the magazine opening and just below the charging handle.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:41:02 AM EDT
[#28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


damn it my photobucket aint working right. But yeah I know what you mean. I had a time figuring out what you were talking about because the diagram was missing part of the assembly.
View Quote


Yeah. Struck me as odd that they'd leave it off the diagram, too.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:42:20 AM EDT
[#29]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I don't have a way to put circles and arrows on the pic. It's the part you see just in front of the magazine opening and just below the charging handle.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Quoted:


I don't have a way to put circles and arrows on the pic. It's the part you see just in front of the magazine opening and just below the charging handle.


that is what i was trying to do. I got the picture edited on my bucket, but when I post the picture it is just the plain picture without the circle.

edit picture added.

Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:48:46 AM EDT
[#30]

Quoted:




The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture.

View Quote


That's... genius. Well, I say genius, perhaps everyone with a bit of proper training behind them knows about it, but it's the first time I've come across it. This little snippet alone has just solved a handful of problems for me, assuming my little dinky machine can handle it
 
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 11:57:52 AM EDT
[#31]
this is a cool thread. I'd have never guessed Johnson/
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 12:39:00 PM EDT
[#32]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

That's... genius. Well, I say genius, perhaps everyone with a bit of proper training behind them knows about it, but it's the first time I've come across it. This little snippet alone has just solved a handful of problems for me, assuming my little dinky machine can handle it


 
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:

The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture.

That's... genius. Well, I say genius, perhaps everyone with a bit of proper training behind them knows about it, but it's the first time I've come across it. This little snippet alone has just solved a handful of problems for me, assuming my little dinky machine can handle it


 


Glad to help. Leave your spindle in neutral so the pin will roll around the part rather than dragging on it.

There are 100s if not 1000s of tips and tricks to this trade to make one's life easier or to enable some accomplishment that some may think impossible.

Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 12:58:33 PM EDT
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Glad to help.

There are 100s if not 1000s of tips and tricks to this trade to make one's life easier or to enable some accomplishment that some may think impossible.

Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture.

That's... genius. Well, I say genius, perhaps everyone with a bit of proper training behind them knows about it, but it's the first time I've come across it. This little snippet alone has just solved a handful of problems for me, assuming my little dinky machine can handle it


 


Glad to help.

There are 100s if not 1000s of tips and tricks to this trade to make one's life easier or to enable some accomplishment that some may think impossible.

Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.


We do some of the same sort of thing on some parts in my shop. When possible I try to employ a cam follower in the spindle but a job I had in here recently the bend was too tight for the cam follower to clear the fixture, it was a bit over 230 degrees. I programmed the spindle tool, a 0.375" dowel pin, to rotate at the surface speed dictated by the feed rate and the periphery of the radius, it minimizes wipe marks on the part. Sometimes you have to think outside the box to maintain a competitive edge.

I like it, nice work.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 1:42:40 PM EDT
[#34]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

We do some of the same sort of thing on some parts in my shop. When possible I try to employ a cam follower in the spindle but a job I had in here recently the bend was too tight for the cam follower to clear the fixture, it was a bit over 230 degrees. I programmed the spindle tool, a 0.375" dowel pin, to rotate at the surface speed dictated by the feed rate and the periphery of the radius, it minimizes wipe marks on the part. Sometimes you have to think outside the box to maintain a competitive edge.

I like it, nice work.
View Quote


Thanks.

You quoted before my edit. I just leave the spindle in neutral but I'm not sure a full blown cnc has that capability. It takes surprisingly little force for this size 1074. IIRC I finished the loop with an 1/8" dowel for a mandrel.

Another trick (and nice thing to know) is you can program the machine to impinge on the material in certain spots, if necessary. You basically "coin"  or pinch the material to get it to perform a certain way.

Some guys really hate form work and it honestly can be very frustrating but I always enjoyed the challenge.

I took this part print to a friend who works at a well known progressive die shop. He says, " I don't think I'd have quoted that one". Thought I was in serious trouble (and would have been if 1074 weren't so forgiving) but made out quite well on them.

" />
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 1:49:56 PM EDT
[#35]
thing for shoulder thing that goes up?
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 6:24:13 PM EDT
[#36]
Some night folks might enjoy this stuff.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 6:39:36 PM EDT
[#37]
Very nice work. Good to see someone keeping an old war horse working.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 6:47:50 PM EDT
[#38]
very nice
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 6:53:55 PM EDT
[#39]
Nice work OP..metal work intrigues me...,
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 7:10:59 PM EDT
[#40]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Nice work OP..metal work intrigues me...,
View Quote

Me too.
Lucky enough to make a living at something I like.
Link Posted: 4/27/2015 7:11:01 PM EDT
[#41]
Cool.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 12:57:10 PM EDT
[#42]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.
View Quote


I started off with no idea what I was doing, getting my hands on an old broken benchmill, taking it apart and rebuilding it. Now I just make stuff up along the way. Still have no idea what I'm doing, but I enjoy the challenge of working out how to get from A to Z without a roadmap.



Of course I'm not making fun stuff like you lot, because I really don't want to go to prison



 
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 4:27:53 PM EDT
[#43]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Glad to help. Leave your spindle in neutral so the pin will roll around the part rather than dragging on it.

There are 100s if not 1000s of tips and tricks to this trade to make one's life easier or to enable some accomplishment that some may think impossible.

Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture.

That's... genius. Well, I say genius, perhaps everyone with a bit of proper training behind them knows about it, but it's the first time I've come across it. This little snippet alone has just solved a handful of problems for me, assuming my little dinky machine can handle it


 


Glad to help. Leave your spindle in neutral so the pin will roll around the part rather than dragging on it.

There are 100s if not 1000s of tips and tricks to this trade to make one's life easier or to enable some accomplishment that some may think impossible.

Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.

I've heard of people doing the bending and pressing using the spindle. I've never actuly seen it done before. I highly doubt they would let me pull a stunt like that at work. I'm sure spit and fists would fly. They'd probably sub it out to a forming shop.
Link Posted: 5/1/2015 4:35:12 PM EDT
[#44]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Some night folks might enjoy this stuff.
View Quote

I certainly did.  Thank you.
Link Posted: 5/4/2015 10:57:59 AM EDT
[#45]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:

I've heard of people doing the bending and pressing using the spindle. I've never actuly seen it done before. I highly doubt they would let me pull a stunt like that at work. I'm sure spit and fists would fly. They'd probably sub it out to a forming shop.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:

The machine is two axis CNC controlled and is used to trace the path around the fixture with a mandrel. It "wipes" the part blank around the fixture.

That's... genius. Well, I say genius, perhaps everyone with a bit of proper training behind them knows about it, but it's the first time I've come across it. This little snippet alone has just solved a handful of problems for me, assuming my little dinky machine can handle it


 


Glad to help. Leave your spindle in neutral so the pin will roll around the part rather than dragging on it.

There are 100s if not 1000s of tips and tricks to this trade to make one's life easier or to enable some accomplishment that some may think impossible.

Starting off doing prototype work in a job shop straight out of trade school and learning from an old British guy who knew his shit was a big leg up for me. I've done some pretty unorthodox stuff.

I've heard of people doing the bending and pressing using the spindle. I've never actuly seen it done before. I highly doubt they would let me pull a stunt like that at work. I'm sure spit and fists would fly. They'd probably sub it out to a forming shop.


I wouldn't do it with any material thicker than what would simulate normal side load on the spindle.

But, yeah, with the bigger shops, there is so much control from above that creativity is quashed. That manifests in a general lack of guys who do shit like what I do....good for me.

I'm quoting a job right now because nobody else wants it. That = high price. (also a high degree of risk).

I don't remember if I mentioned it before. I made a set of ceramic parts. Once they were fired, I gave them to the customer and said, "You now own them. You'll have to assemble them. I claim no guarantee on their performance and longevity".

We knew it was a risky venture. They lasted .5 ops and broke (as I expected they would). Seven grand, out the window. Actually they paid $7k to know this method won't work, so it wasn't a total waste.
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