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Posted: 12/30/2016 12:57:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: Firefinder37]
In the foreground is U.S. sniper Pfc. Edward J. Foley, Co 'G', 143rd Infantry, 36th Infantry Division cleaning his Springfield 1903A4 rifle, Near Velletri, Lazio, Italy. 29 May 1944.Bill Gorman, a veteran who served with Foley stated "Foley soon realized being a sniper was not a good career" It brought too much fire to him. Gorman also stated that "the 5 shot 1903A4 bolt sniper rifle - with a 4 power scope was a waste" Foley swapped it for an M1 Garand and took the helmet camo off.

On the 18th of May the 143rd Regiment sailed from the port of Pozzuoli near Naples and closed in at the Anzio beach head on the following day. On the morning of May 23d, the Regiment jumped off in an attack to break out of the beach head and entered the line on the road to Rome near the town of Velletri.

The Division, in a daring maneuver, sent the 142d Infantry and the 143 Infantry from the left flank squarely across the Division front under cover of darkness and the two regiments infiltrated to the rear of Velletri, up a 2,000-foot peak before the Germans realized what had happened. With the capture of the hills in rear of Velletri, the town folded and the race to Rome was on. Charging through the Alban Hills, the regiment arrived in the outskirts of Rome about 4 p.m. on the afternoon of June 4th, 1944.
 (Nb: Foley came from 10 Odile St., Methuen, Massachusetts. He appears to be wearing Corcoran Jump boots)(Source - US Army Signal Corps)(Colourised by Benjamin Thomas from Australia)

Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:00:59 PM EDT
[#1]
That is very cool.  Thanks for sharing that.

Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:07:14 PM EDT
[#2]
Cool picture. They were heroes for sure.
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:07:35 PM EDT
[#3]
25th December 1943

"Left to right, PVT John A. Quinn, 163rd Signal Photo Company, Syracuse, N.Y., PFC Bennett Fenberg, Detroit, Mich., of 163rd Signal Photo Company, and CPL Harry Koppelman, Cleveland, Ohio, 3rd Division, Hqs., enjoy their Christmas dinner on the hood of a jeep." 
San Felice area, Italy. 25th of December 1943. 

Photo by Goebel, 163rd Signal Photo Company. SC 186790, Credit NARA. 



Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:09:02 PM EDT
[#4]
Great pic

I only count one Garand and the rest are 03's.
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:09:48 PM EDT
[#5]
An American mortar team firing a 107-mm mortar M2 (M2 4.2 inch mortar) on the streets of a destroyed German town in early 1945.

US Chemical Mortar Battalions were army units attached to Infantry divisions. They were armed with 4.2 in (107 mm) chemical mortars. For this reason they were also called the "Four-deucers".

Chemical mortars were so named because of their capability of firing not only high explosive, but also chemical, gas, incendiary and smoke marker shells. Chemical shells were on stand-by during World War II, to be used in retaliation should the enemy employ chemical weapons first.

Before the war, the Americans updated their 4.2-inch M1 mortar (107 mm) entering service in 1928 and which was inspired by the Mk I 4 inch (102 mm) British mortar. The new 'M2' model had a new reinforced structure and could fire shells reaching 4 km range with the addition of propellant charges on the tail.
With a weight of 151 kg, it was divided into three parts: a base plate, a bipod and a smooth-bore tube. It could fire explosive shells (HE model M3 11.11 kg with 3.64 kg of TNT), smoke shells (WP model M2 11.57 kg) and chemical shells (model H M2 13 kg).

(Photo source - nationaalarchief.nl.)


Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:11:52 PM EDT
[Last Edit: mikepiet] [#6]
I would definitely recommend people check out the WW2 colorized photo page on Facebook.

Everyday they post multiple rare pics from all sides of the battle lines that have been meticulously colored by artists from around the world.

Everyday is an excellent new pic that comes with a brief story of the who, what, where. It's a public page so you DO NOT need a facebook account to view the page

https://www.facebook.com/WW2-Colourised-Photos-393166910813107/


EDIT, looks like OP pulled these pics right from the FB page so be sure to check it out!
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:12:46 PM EDT
[#7]
Brave men right there.  The best of all time actually.
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:14:21 PM EDT
[#8]
Odd that he called the 03 "a waste". I wonder what he meant by that?
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:15:20 PM EDT
[#9]
B-17G Flying Fortress "Lady be Good" -J of 728 Bomb Squadron, 452 Bomb Group dodging flak (exploding anti aircraft shells) on a mission over the Ludwigshafen Industrial Oil Refinery in western Germany on September 21 1944.

"Lady be Good"
Delivered Cheyenne 29/4/44; Kearney 10/5/44; Grenier 25/5/44; Assigned 728BS/452BG [9Z- ] Deopham Green 27/5/44; battle damaged Frankfurt 5/1/45 with Hurbert Gay, Co-pilot: Billy Carr, Navigator: Jim Graham, togg-Walt Whitmore, Flight engineer/top turret gunner: Don Sherlock, Radio Operator: Ralph Whittaker, Ball turret gunner: John Ryder, Waist gunner: Glen Stockglausner, Waist gunner: Patrick Blake, Tail gunner: Rich Hahn (10 Returned to Duty); flak KOd #1 then #3; force landed Bitche, France; Salvaged 21/1/45; Salvaged 6/3/45.


Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:24:08 PM EDT
[#10]
My father was in the 3rd ID from November 1942 till the end of the war. I asked him what his favorite weapon was and his answer was the 1903. He died in 2002 and never talked about the war with me. Although I did over hear a few stories he told some of the other WW2 vets.

Earlier this year a cousin of the same generation as my father told me my father was a sniper.
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:29:27 PM EDT
[#11]
An M3A1 Halftrack named "Bitching Pals" of 'B' Company, 27th Armored Infantry Battalion, 9th Armored Division, 1st U.S. Army, moves through Engers, on the right banks of the river Rhine in Germany. 
The town was heavily mined and caution in approach with armor was necessary. 27 March 1945.

The M3A1 is armed with an M2 "Ma Deuce" .50 Caliber Machine Gun mounted on an M49 ring mount above the cab.


Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:31:39 PM EDT
[#12]
Cpl. James Gordon and Pvt. L.C. Rainwater of the US 2nd Armored Div., inspect a Panzer V 'Panther' of 2.SS Panzer Division "Das Reich" deserted near the village of Grandménil in Belgium.

Sometime after the of Battle 25 - 27 December 1944.

When the 2.SS Pz Div., pulled back form Grandménil on 26 December 1944, seven Panther tanks were left behind for various reasons. One of them still remains as a memorial of the bloody winter day in late 1944 when this village with barely three hundred inhabitants became a focal point in the great Ardennes Battle.


Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:35:22 PM EDT
[#13]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mikepiet:
I would definitely recommend people check out the WW2 colorized photo page on Facebook.

Everyday they post multiple rare pics from all sides of the battle lines that have been meticulously colored by artists from around the world.

Everyday is an excellent new pic that comes with a brief story of the who, what, where. It's a public page so you DO NOT need a facebook account to view the page

https://www.facebook.com/WW2-Colourised-Photos-393166910813107/


EDIT, looks like OP pulled these pics right from the FB page so be sure to check it out!
View Quote


Awesome FB page, I love WWII stuff.
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:37:22 PM EDT
[Last Edit: SGL_Shooter] [#14]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
An M3A1 Halftrack named "Bitching Pals" of 'B' Company, 27th Armored Infantry Battalion, 9th Armored Division, 1st U.S. Army, moves through Engers, on the right banks of the river Rhine in Germany. 
The town was heavily mined and caution in approach with armor was necessary. 27 March 1945.

The M3A1 is armed with an M2 "Ma Deuce" .50 Caliber Machine Gun mounted on an M49 ring mount above the cab.


https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/15697899_1088482544614870_3180496650005133575_n.jpg?oh=c72f88eb6ee13d3889e54efaa6d28e18&oe=591DF765
View Quote



Someone would have a shit-fit if we named any vehicle that today. Great pics.
Link Posted: 12/30/2016 1:56:37 PM EDT
[#15]
US Sgt. Hiram E. Prouty from Baltimore (20344717) of US 175th Infantry Regiment, 29th Infantry Division dressed as Santa Claus arriving on a late production M3 tank (W-3,028,835) "Buccaneer" at Camp Perham Down, Wiltshire, England. December 1942 

Sgt. Prouty was with the 175th, in the 29th Division's reserve, which landed on the still unsecured Omaha Beach on the morning of 7 June, and proceeded to its objective to seize the village of Isigny. It pushed through Isigny and crossed the Vire River and on to St Lo. The 175th fought stiff German resistance hedge row by hedge row. The 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry pushed the American lines to within three miles of St Lo, creating a salient into the German lines. The unit defended the high ground, known as Hill 108 but nicknamed "Purple Heart Hill" as they were surrounded on three sides.
The regiment was rotated into the division reserve for the final thrust into St Lo. The 175th fought in Normandy until the end of August when the division was moved to Brittany to participate in the capture of Brest and the German submarine pens located there. Following the Battle of Brest, the division was moved to the Netherlands to participate in the 9th Army’s drive to the Rhine River. The regiment played a significant role in capturing Jülich followed by the occupation of the industrial center of Mönchengladbach. The regiment was moved to occupy the lines along the Elbe River near Felberg. On 2 May 1945, a patrol from 3-175 Infantry made contact with elements of the 28th Company, 6th Guards Cavalry of the Russian army. Following the surrender of the German army, the regiment remained in Europe until 1 January 1946.

Hiram E. Prouty 28/1/1918 - 1/12/1975

Link Posted: 12/30/2016 6:29:37 PM EDT
[#16]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
25th December 1943s

"Left to right, PVT John A. Quinn, 163rd Signal Photo Company, Syracuse, N.Y., PFC Bennett Fenberg, Detroit, Mich., of 163rd Signal Photo Company, and CPL Harry Koppelman, Cleveland, Ohio, 3rd Division, Hqs., enjoy their Christmas dinner on the hood of a jeep." 
San Felice area, Italy. 25th of December 1943. 

Photo by Goebel, 163rd Signal Photo Company. SC 186790, Credit NARA. 



https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/15672915_1084252838371174_6730212236139634301_n.jpg?oh=9608cacb7d0803696b5e1beff4940b69&oe=58F55726
View Quote



Hey, that's pretty neat.  i doubt he is related, he spelled his first name different, and he doesn't look like me or any else on my Dad's side of the family, but still.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 12:18:55 PM EDT
[#17]
76 years ago today

The crew of a British Light Tank Mk.VIB having a "brew up" and cooking their Christmas dinner beside their vehicle, in Libya, North Africa.
31st of December 1940.

(note - they are sitting on fuel or water containers and using a cut in half, empty can (a "flimsy" - the infamous 4-Gallon non-returnable petrol tin) for heating the food, referred to at the time as a "Banghazi Fire". The tanker seated in the middle is holding a can of 'Pilsner Lager'.)

(© IWM E 1501)
Capt. G Keating - No 1 Army Film & Photographic Unit.

The Mk VIB was also used in the North African campaign against the Italians late in 1940 with the 3rd Hussars and the 7th Armoured Division. Late in 1940 the British had 200 light tanks (presumably the Mk VIB) along with 75 cruiser tanks (A9, A10, A13) and 45 Matilda IIs. An attack by the 3rd Hussars on 12 December 1940 resulted in the tanks getting bogged down in salt pans and severely mauled. The 7th Armoured Division had 100 left on 3 January 1941 and 120 tanks on 21 January at which time they were used in flanking far into the rear and gathering up scattered Italian troops, sometimes joining or leaving the main attacks to the Cruiser and Matilda II tanks. The 2nd RTR continued to battle the Italians with light tanks as late as 6 February 1941.

(Colourised by Benjamin Thomas from Australia)
https://www.facebook.com/coloursofyesterday


Link Posted: 12/31/2016 12:46:19 PM EDT
[#18]
Cool pictures.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 12:50:40 PM EDT
[#19]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
Cpl. James Gordon and Pvt. L.C. Rainwater of the US 2nd Armored Div., inspect a Panzer V 'Panther' of 2.SS Panzer Division "Das Reich" deserted near the village of Grandménil in Belgium.

Sometime after the of Battle 25 - 27 December 1944.

When the 2.SS Pz Div., pulled back form Grandménil on 26 December 1944, seven Panther tanks were left behind for various reasons. One of them still remains as a memorial of the bloody winter day in late 1944 when this village with barely three hundred inhabitants became a focal point in the great Ardennes Battle.


https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/15740923_1087246748071783_2174535704322307354_n.jpg?oh=0038a18d6d93a460c8c1fb60a9d52871&oe=58D6A424
View Quote

Question:  Are tanks warm in winter?  Assuming the engine is running of course.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 1:19:13 PM EDT
[#20]
From the same Facebook page:





My father was there, that day, with the 399th.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 1:34:38 PM EDT
[#21]



'When one weapon just isn't enough'

This photo was featured on the cover of 'YANK' Magazine, Continental Edition of January 14, 1945, entitled "PRESENT ARMS" - it featured Pfc. Robert Leigh and his collection of enemy weapons taken by the 83rd Infantry Division during the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. (MP.38 and MP.40's, an MG.34 and an MG42)

The Cover soldier:
Private First Class Robert E. Leigh, from Washington DC, was born on September 15, 1919. He had a Grammar school education and his occupation was listed as "Plumbers, gas fitters and steam fitters". 
Robert Leigh (#33044651) enlisted in the service on May 22, 1941 in Richmond, Virginia.
In the European Theatre of Operation (ETO), he was a Rifleman, Private First Class in the 83rd Infantry Division, 329st. Infantry Regiment, 1st Battalion, B Company, where he was assigned on July 24, 1944, while the Company was in the vicinity of Sainteny, Normandy, France.
The picture for the Yank cover was taken in Gurzenich (Düren), Germany, probably just after the 1st and 2nd Battalion of the 329th Infantry Regiment had taken Gurzenich during the bloody battle of the Hürtgen Forest.

Robert E. Leigh died at age 76, on January 26, 1996.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 1:38:08 PM EDT
[#22]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Avidrook:

Question:  Are tanks warm in winter?  Assuming the engine is running of course.
View Quote
Without the heater running, no.  When the engine is running, the deck above the engine gets warm.  But in general, tracks are like freezers in the winter.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 1:39:54 PM EDT
[#23]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Avidrook:

Question:  Are tanks warm in winter?  Assuming the engine is running of course.
View Quote


Not warm in the crew compartments even with the engine running from my experience.  They become giant refrigerators. I was on the M60A3 and when my heater went out during Reforger 85  I learned how to fix it quickly.  I don't think the tanks from WW2 had heaters in them.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 1:41:09 PM EDT
[#24]
... Very cool finding these historic jewels, thanks
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 1:46:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: corwin1968] [#25]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mikepiet:
I would definitely recommend people check out the WW2 colorized photo page on Facebook.

Everyday they post multiple rare pics from all sides of the battle lines that have been meticulously colored by artists from around the world.

Everyday is an excellent new pic that comes with a brief story of the who, what, where. It's a public page so you DO NOT need a facebook account to view the page

https://www.facebook.com/WW2-Colourised-Photos-393166910813107/


EDIT, looks like OP pulled these pics right from the FB page so be sure to check it out!
View Quote

Well, there goes my Saturday afternoon.....and possibly evening!   


ETA:  I've never seen this one!!   Left-to-right:  Winters, Nixon, Welsh, Peacock and Cox (?)

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 2:14:36 PM EDT
[#26]
From listening to B- 17 and 25 member they didn't dodge flak. Just flew on through.  Balls, Big Balls!
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 2:42:09 PM EDT
[#27]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PhulesAu:
From listening to B- 17 and 25 member they didn't dodge flak. Just flew on through.  Balls, Big Balls!
View Quote


Had to stay in formation to get to the target.  From what I understand the formation was the "safest" place to be.  The 50 cals covered all angles enemy aircraft approched.

Still had balls that clanked.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 2:52:18 PM EDT
[#28]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By veritas_rasa:
Odd that he called the 03 "a waste". I wonder what he meant by that?
View Quote
Bolt action compared to semi auto, can only load magazine singly, as scope covers slot for clip.  Scope wasn't anything to write home about, either.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 4:03:15 PM EDT
[#29]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
Without the heater running, no.  When the engine is running, the deck above the engine gets warm.  But in general, tracks are like freezers in the winter.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
Originally Posted By Avidrook:

Question:  Are tanks warm in winter?  Assuming the engine is running of course.
Without the heater running, no.  When the engine is running, the deck above the engine gets warm.  But in general, tracks are like freezers in the winter.

Interesting
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 4:44:08 PM EDT
[#30]
Thanks for sharing these photos. So much respect for these men. Brass balls, the lot of em.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 4:52:04 PM EDT
[#31]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By corwin1968:

Well, there goes my Saturday afternoon.....and possibly evening!   


ETA:  I've never seen this one!!   Left-to-right:  Winters, Nixon, Welsh, Peacock and Cox (?)

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/42575/15723639-1088060877990370-7066414439106102598-o-117402.JPG
View Quote


Holy cow, I want a print of that to hang in my office.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 4:56:28 PM EDT
[#32]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Hank618:
Thanks for sharing these photos. So much respect for these men. Brass balls, the lot of em.
View Quote


No shit. The oral histories at the WWII museum yesterday had me in awe. Hard to believe any of them survived. Heroes every last one of them, especially the ones that are still over there.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 4:56:49 PM EDT
[#33]
Awesome pics! Thanks for sharing OP.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:10:05 PM EDT
[#34]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
B-17G Flying Fortress "Lady be Good" -J of 728 Bomb Squadron, 452 Bomb Group dodging flak (exploding anti aircraft shells) on a mission over the Ludwigshafen Industrial Oil Refinery in western Germany on September 21 1944.

"Lady be Good"
Delivered Cheyenne 29/4/44; Kearney 10/5/44; Grenier 25/5/44; Assigned 728BS/452BG [9Z- ] Deopham Green 27/5/44; battle damaged Frankfurt 5/1/45 with Hurbert Gay, Co-pilot: Billy Carr, Navigator: Jim Graham, togg-Walt Whitmore, Flight engineer/top turret gunner: Don Sherlock, Radio Operator: Ralph Whittaker, Ball turret gunner: John Ryder, Waist gunner: Glen Stockglausner, Waist gunner: Patrick Blake, Tail gunner: Rich Hahn (10 Returned to Duty); flak KOd #1 then #3; force landed Bitche, France; Salvaged 21/1/45; Salvaged 6/3/45.


https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/15723631_1088496077946850_3472171653035004688_o.jpg?oh=4dbeb32904a8a4856ceaf582409cec1f&oe=58DA6D00
View Quote
Same name as the b24 that went missing in Africa
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:11:29 PM EDT
[Last Edit: somedude] [#35]
got  some pics but not any captions.Attachment Attached File
Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:11:59 PM EDT
[#36]
Found this on the FB page. What kind of gun does the guy on the right side of the picture have?

Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:14:29 PM EDT
[#37]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By birdbarian:
Found this on the FB page. What kind of gun does the guy on the right side of the picture have?

https://scontent-mia1-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/15780730_1088494627946995_4871654926851845132_n.jpg?oh=49bc6da169e5009e24a9083127281b56&oe=58F28A2E
View Quote


Owen smg  , Aussie weapon
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:14:41 PM EDT
[#38]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By corwin1968:

Well, there goes my Saturday afternoon.....and possibly evening!   


ETA:  I've never seen this one!!   Left-to-right:  Winters, Nixon, Welsh, Peacock and Cox (?)

https://www.AR15.Com/media/mediaFiles/42575/15723639-1088060877990370-7066414439106102598-o-117402.JPG
View Quote


That's a great shot. Nixon was in heaven
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:15:25 PM EDT
[#39]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Flatland:


Holy cow, I want a print of that to hang in my office.
View Quote
Much bigger version:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8725/28642380365_3513bd0dae_k.jpg


from: https://www.reddit.com/r/ColorizedHistory/comments/4x1zte/major_richard_winters_captain_lewis_nixon_and/
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:19:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: somedude] [#40]
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:26:22 PM EDT
[#41]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefinder37:
An American mortar team firing a 107-mm mortar M2 (M2 4.2 inch mortar) on the streets of a destroyed German town in early 1945.

US Chemical Mortar Battalions were army units attached to Infantry divisions. They were armed with 4.2 in (107 mm) chemical mortars. For this reason they were also called the "Four-deucers".

Chemical mortars were so named because of their capability of firing not only high explosive, but also chemical, gas, incendiary and smoke marker shells. Chemical shells were on stand-by during World War II, to be used in retaliation should the enemy employ chemical weapons first.

Before the war, the Americans updated their 4.2-inch M1 mortar (107 mm) entering service in 1928 and which was inspired by the Mk I 4 inch (102 mm) British mortar. The new 'M2' model had a new reinforced structure and could fire shells reaching 4 km range with the addition of propellant charges on the tail.
With a weight of 151 kg, it was divided into three parts: a base plate, a bipod and a smooth-bore tube. It could fire explosive shells (HE model M3 11.11 kg with 3.64 kg of TNT), smoke shells (WP model M2 11.57 kg) and chemical shells (model H M2 13 kg).

(Photo source - nationaalarchief.nl.)


https://scontent-sjc2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/15732259_1088797777916680_8867847722207978642_o.jpg?oh=f6014882ad896a7162afe00e272fa02b&oe=58EC382E
View Quote




My grandpa was in a chemical mortar battalion, i think he was a forward observer and got the bronze star for running into incoming fire to repair communication line to call in support. Also liberated a sub-camp of dachou and took pictures.

Cool picture, i bet my grandpa was somewhere in the area..
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:26:24 PM EDT
[#42]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By somedude:


Owen smg  , Aussie weapon
http://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/imgs/owen-smg.jpg
View Quote


Thanks!!
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 5:27:16 PM EDT
[#43]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By birdbarian:
Found this on the FB page. What kind of gun does the guy on the right side of the picture have?

https://scontent-mia1-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/15780730_1088494627946995_4871654926851845132_n.jpg?oh=49bc6da169e5009e24a9083127281b56&oe=58F28A2E
View Quote


Owen 9mm carbine. Australia's answer to the STEN gun.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 6:42:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: birdbarian] [#44]
Badass selfie

Could this be the first ever Wartime Military 'Selfie' ?

An unknown British Paratrooper from the 10th Parachute Battalion photographs himself as he falls from a modified Armstrong Whitworth Whitley bomber in training at RAF Ringway, Cheshire, England. March 1943
View Quote


Link Posted: 12/31/2016 7:09:05 PM EDT
[#45]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mikepiet:
I would definitely recommend people check out the WW2 colorized photo page on Facebook.

Everyday they post multiple rare pics from all sides of the battle lines that have been meticulously colored by artists from around the world.

Everyday is an excellent new pic that comes with a brief story of the who, what, where. It's a public page so you DO NOT need a facebook account to view the page

https://www.facebook.com/WW2-Colourised-Photos-393166910813107/


EDIT, looks like OP pulled these pics right from the FB page so be sure to check it out!
View Quote

Thanks for the cool link. My uncle was all over the Euro theatre.
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 7:18:43 PM EDT
[#46]
A Captured STUG used by the US noticed the concrete reinforced armor
Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 7:20:02 PM EDT
[#47]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Thanks for posting that!  Everyone has a drink in their hand except Winters!
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 7:21:24 PM EDT
[#48]
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 7:25:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: somedude] [#49]
Link Posted: 12/31/2016 7:26:55 PM EDT
[#50]
Amazing picture. Is it colorized? Or legit color film?
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