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Posted: 6/12/2009 11:52:47 AM EST
Tie rod broke on my minivan last night - I was leaving someone's house, went to make the turn, and couldn't. Ended up in a grassy area on the side of the road. The wheels bladed at right about 45 degrees from straight ahead - one left, the other right.

Fortunately, the guy whose house I was leaving owns the grassy area too, so it can sit for the weekend while I get tools together to go fix the issue.

Also, it didn't break when I was driving my usual 70-80 MPH on 405/520. That would have sucked dog balls.

Pics this weekend.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 11:59:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/12/2009 12:00:24 PM EST by cmjohnson]
Glad it didn't happen at a worse time.

I've always thought that the way the front steering linkages are hooked up is totally ass backwards.

The way I see it, if every link broke and fell out, the wheels should remain straight and neutral,
as the steering system would have its center of motion in FRONT of the hubs. Essentially the front
wheels should be being dragged along behind the steering system, instead of being pushed along
in front of it.

Think of a shopping cart's front wheels. (A good cart, not one that's got flat spots on the wheels or missing
ball bearings.) Same idea.


It should also be designed so that the vehicle remains steerable if either ONE of the hubs is still connected
to the steering linkage, and the other just follows along if its linkage is broken.

This would be a very safe system.




CJ
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 12:01:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Glad it didn't happen at a worse time.

I've always thought that the way the front steering linkages are hooked up is totally ass backwards.

The way I see it, if every link broke and fell out, the wheels should remain straight and neutral,
as the steering system would have its center of motion in FRONT of the hubs. Essentially the front
wheels should be being dragged along behind the steering system, instead of being pushed along
in front of it.

Think of a shopping cart's front wheels. (A good cart, not one that's got flat spots on the wheels or missing
ball bearings.) Same idea.


It should also be designed so that the vehicle remains steerable if either ONE of the hubs is still connected
to the steering linkage, and the other just follows along if its linkage is broken.

This would be a very safe system.

CJ

That's an interesting idea, I have no idea why nobody has done that yet.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 12:19:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Glad it didn't happen at a worse time.

I've always thought that the way the front steering linkages are hooked up is totally ass backwards.

The way I see it, if every link broke and fell out, the wheels should remain straight and neutral,
as the steering system would have its center of motion in FRONT of the hubs. Essentially the front
wheels should be being dragged along behind the steering system, instead of being pushed along
in front of it.

Think of a shopping cart's front wheels. (A good cart, not one that's got flat spots on the wheels or missing
ball bearings.) Same idea.


It should also be designed so that the vehicle remains steerable if either ONE of the hubs is still connected
to the steering linkage, and the other just follows along if its linkage is broken.

This would be a very safe system.

CJ

All shopping carts will experience caster flutter at a particular speed. I would assume applying some kind of dampener could make it work on a car but i suspect the end result would be very heavy and darty steering.

Link Posted: 6/12/2009 12:22:55 PM EST

Originally Posted By FMJshooter:

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Glad it didn't happen at a worse time.

I've always thought that the way the front steering linkages are hooked up is totally ass backwards.

The way I see it, if every link broke and fell out, the wheels should remain straight and neutral,
as the steering system would have its center of motion in FRONT of the hubs. Essentially the front
wheels should be being dragged along behind the steering system, instead of being pushed along
in front of it.

Think of a shopping cart's front wheels. (A good cart, not one that's got flat spots on the wheels or missing
ball bearings.) Same idea.


It should also be designed so that the vehicle remains steerable if either ONE of the hubs is still connected
to the steering linkage, and the other just follows along if its linkage is broken.

This would be a very safe system.

CJ

All shopping carts will experience caster flutter at a particular speed. I would assume applying some kind of dampener could make it work on a car but i suspect the end result would be very heavy and darty steering.


The steering would be heavier mostly because the rest position would be at a more stable equilibrium. You could fix this simply by increasing the power to the power steering system. It would be easier to keep the car going straight at high speeds though. No hands needed!
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 1:00:51 PM EST
Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
I've always thought that the way the front steering linkages are hooked up is totally ass backwards.


it must be easier to get the linkage to the rear, since the input shaft to the pitman unit is shorter and you don't have to get over/under the axle. that's the only reason I can think of to design it this way.

I dropped a tie rod in 86 or 87, I was able to drive home at about 10 MPH. No dice on this ride; 4wd somehow precludes the wheel tracking straight at any time.

Link Posted: 6/12/2009 1:22:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/12/2009 1:22:38 PM EST by FMJshooter]

Originally Posted By max229:

Originally Posted By FMJshooter:

Originally Posted By cmjohnson:
Glad it didn't happen at a worse time.

I've always thought that the way the front steering linkages are hooked up is totally ass backwards.

The way I see it, if every link broke and fell out, the wheels should remain straight and neutral,
as the steering system would have its center of motion in FRONT of the hubs. Essentially the front
wheels should be being dragged along behind the steering system, instead of being pushed along
in front of it.

Think of a shopping cart's front wheels. (A good cart, not one that's got flat spots on the wheels or missing
ball bearings.) Same idea.


It should also be designed so that the vehicle remains steerable if either ONE of the hubs is still connected
to the steering linkage, and the other just follows along if its linkage is broken.

This would be a very safe system.




CJ

All shopping carts will experience caster flutter at a particular speed. I would assume applying some kind of dampener could make it work on a car but i suspect the end result would be very heavy and darty steering.


The steering would be heavier mostly because the rest position would be at a more stable equilibrium. You could fix this simply by increasing the power to the power steering system. It would be easier to keep the car going straight at high speeds though. No hands needed!

Just pray the engine doesn't stall and you get stuck with manual steering.

Link Posted: 6/16/2009 5:55:05 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/16/2009 5:55:18 PM EST by RyJones]
A busted tie rod:


A common sight:


This is the third or fourth time this tow truck driver has towed this vehicle. (click images for larger sizes)
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