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Posted: 6/3/2008 11:41:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/3/2008 11:41:54 PM EST by metroplex]
Are there any golfers here? I'm thinking about starting but I have no clue where to begin. I've read through some of the fundamentals on Wiki.
Link Posted: 6/3/2008 11:53:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/3/2008 11:53:21 PM EST by Hawken50]
use one of these-



to hit one of these-



into one of these-



oh, wait, no. make that- into one of these-





Link Posted: 6/3/2008 11:56:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/3/2008 11:57:38 PM EST by swingset]
You can always take lessons, almost any course has a pro that can get you started.

The great thing is now even the most affordable clubs are great compared to what was available 20 years ago, and it's an easy sport once you figure out the basic mechanics.

Some tips I can tell you, that you cannot hear or practice enough and they really advanced my game quickly as a new player:

Keep your eye on the ball the ENTIRE swing. Don't let yourself look down range before you strike the ball. Sounds simple, but even the best golfers forget to keep their eye on the ball.

Position your head above the ball, don't move it from side to side, or up & down during the swing. Remind yourself before every swing "Don't move my fucking head". This will force your body to be in alignment, the elevation of your swing to remain constant, and will prevent you from hitting too far under or over the ball.

Follow through, every time. Once you contact the ball, what you do to carry the club up and over your opposing shoulder will determine your consistency. Always follow through, always the same way, every time.

Don't muscle the swing, EVER. Speed makes a long drive, not muscle. Relax, swing comfortably and gently and let experience increase distance. Men's urge is to power the fuck out of the club, that's a horrible tendency.

Also, twist at the waist as you swing. When you're at take-away (or cocked with the club over your right shoulder), your hips should be facing back away from the ball. At address or when you contact the ball your hips should be perpendicular to the ball, and after you make contact your hips should square up and face down range. Having that twist to your hips will allow you to make power....contortion and a spring-like drive of your upper body. Watch Tiger Woods do this:
video.search.yahoo.com/video/play?p=golf+swing&n=21&ei=utf-8&js=1&fr=yfp-t-501&fr2=tab-web&tnr=20&vid=1306671964
Watch his hips, you'll see exactly what I mean.

Good luck, it's a fun game and the parallels to shooting are actually quite helpful. Muscle memory, consistency, yardage estimation, and patience. Oh, and you can drink & drive legally, which rocks.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 12:26:57 AM EST
Always go prepared.

Link Posted: 6/4/2008 12:40:29 AM EST
Swingset: Thanks for the pointers! I'm going to print them out. Do you have any recommendations on how to start off? Some of the hourly rates for lessons seems rather high ($50-$100) and I'd like to practice as much as possible. I read a few sites that recommended practicing putting, followed by ghost driving, etc... which would mean I need a set of clubs. How do I get sized for clubs, or am I jumping the gun here?
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 3:33:28 AM EST
bump for morning crew
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 3:38:57 AM EST
A lot of courses offer beginner camps or clinics, that would be a great place to start. Listen to swingset he has some great pointers, I worked in the golf business (the maintenance side) for 7 years after college and I was exposed to some great teachers and methods. I have played golf since I was about 12 and it took going to instructors and unlearning all of the father taught and self taught bad habits to really improve. I am still not great, but my enjoyment of a round of golf has increased exponentially. It comes in darn handy for taking clients out to play.

I would even look for a pro who works with kids alot, they tend to be more patient and have a really great sense of teaching. I know that it seems expensive for lessons, but I think it is well worth the investment.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 3:41:06 AM EST
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 3:45:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By streetfighter:
Golf is for ghey people that don't like recoil.
It has neither noise or supersonic projectiles and therefore has none of the attributes of a satisfactory sport


A gold course is a waste of a good rifle range huh? Unfortantly, business deals cant be conducted at the rifle range while they can be on the golf course.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 3:45:28 AM EST
I have no clue. I started when I was 4. Read a book on rules and etiquette before you even step foot on the course. Get swinging lessons and hit nothing but golf balls on the driving range. For the first month hit nothing but your pitching wedge or 8-9 iron. Gradually work your way up. At the same time practice putting and chipping. Do this for 2 months, then get on the course.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 3:54:31 AM EST
For cheap lessons, to get started, go to the local Community College or Parks & Rec.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:00:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By streetfighter:
Golf is for ghey people that don't like recoil.
It has neither noise or supersonic projectiles and therefore has none of the attributes of a satisfactory sport


to me, a well-hit golf ball is vastly more rewarding than a well-placed shot with a weapon.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:01:10 AM EST
Also, since you are just starting it will be easiest now.. start doing a pre-shot routine. Meaning... figure out a preshot routine that you will use for each shot and do it every time before you swing that club. It takes your golf from a concious level to a subconcious level (Meaning your swing will become automatic so you won't think as much about what you are doing - which is what you want).

Jack Nicklaus for example never varied more than 1 second on his preshot routine (always does it the same) and won 18 majors. You may not win majors, but you will be more consistent.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:01:10 AM EST

Originally Posted By NoVaGator:

Originally Posted By streetfighter:
Golf is for ghey people that don't like recoil.
It has neither noise or supersonic projectiles and therefore has none of the attributes of a satisfactory sport


to me, a well-hit golf ball is vastly more rewarding than a well-placed shot with a weapon.
Rings in the loins.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:02:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By whyzdom:
Also, since you are just starting it will be easiest now.. start doing a pre-shot routine. Meaning... figure out a preshot routine that you will use for each shot and do it every time before you swing that club. It takes your golf from a concious level to a subconcious level (Meaning your swing will become automatic so you won't think as much about what you are doing - which is what you want).

Jack Nicklaus for example never varied more than 1 second on his preshot routine (always does it the same) and won 18 majors. You may not win majors, but you will be more consistent.
I think you are probably getting ahead of the man's skill level. Right now he probably stands a 25% chance of actually hitting the ball, much less understanding the concept of a pre-shot routine.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:07:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:

Originally Posted By whyzdom:
Also, since you are just starting it will be easiest now.. start doing a pre-shot routine. Meaning... figure out a preshot routine that you will use for each shot and do it every time before you swing that club. It takes your golf from a concious level to a subconcious level (Meaning your swing will become automatic so you won't think as much about what you are doing - which is what you want).

Jack Nicklaus for example never varied more than 1 second on his preshot routine (always does it the same) and won 18 majors. You may not win majors, but you will be more consistent.
I think you are probably getting ahead of the man's skill level. Right now he probably stands a 25% chance of actually hitting the ball, much less understanding the concept of a pre-shot routine.


Maybe, but if he starts now there will be less to relearn later.

Also, check out this video.. grab a notepad and write down what he says!

/giggle

www.youtube.com/watch?v=okqHkFxPU3s
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:09:35 AM EST

Originally Posted By whyzdom:

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:

Originally Posted By whyzdom:
Also, since you are just starting it will be easiest now.. start doing a pre-shot routine. Meaning... figure out a preshot routine that you will use for each shot and do it every time before you swing that club. It takes your golf from a concious level to a subconcious level (Meaning your swing will become automatic so you won't think as much about what you are doing - which is what you want).

Jack Nicklaus for example never varied more than 1 second on his preshot routine (always does it the same) and won 18 majors. You may not win majors, but you will be more consistent.
I think you are probably getting ahead of the man's skill level. Right now he probably stands a 25% chance of actually hitting the ball, much less understanding the concept of a pre-shot routine.


Maybe, but if he starts now there will be less to relearn later.

Also, check out this video.. grab a notepad and write down what he says!

/giggle

www.youtube.com/watch?v=okqHkFxPU3s


www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZD1vkzYmyI
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 4:14:55 AM EST
I'd recommend renting or getting a cheap set of clubs until you know golf is for you. Most courses and ranges rent clubs (demos-usually decent to good quality clubs). Go to the range and get a feel for the swing and m aking contact. Get to know which club does what, ie driver hits low and long, 9 iron hits high and short. Once you can make consistent contact, go out with a friend and play a round. Let them teach you about etiquette, scoring, etc.. I started in high school played throughout college with a set of mismatched no name brand clubs. By the the time a graduated college, I was consistently scoring in the high 80's low 90's. I was also playing 2 times a week. The best part about that was 9 holes only cost $3.50, and often it was free (college run course that I had friends at). It just takes practice, time, and money, and more practice. Good luck!
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 8:55:34 AM EST
What are some good cheap clubs to buy used/new? What types of clubs should I have?
An eBay search showed clubs ranging from $400-$1000.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 8:59:00 AM EST
find a set of cheap clubs

(my first set cost me 27$ with a bag)


go a driving range and start swinging


You will never be any less frustrated with golf than you are at this moment.



j/k good luck

there are several good beginner level instructional videos out there. Go to a FYE or similar store and look for the DVDs
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 9:06:48 AM EST
Getting a pro should be somewhere around $75 for an hour, but you should be able to find one for less ($100 cover my brother and myself about a year ago). I'd start off with that. They'll show you proper grip, probably using a trainer grip and proper stance. If you start of with help it will help you more down the line, you won't have to unlearn bad habits.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 9:08:21 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/4/2008 9:09:46 AM EST by Fuggles]
Do yourself a favor and pay for the professional instruction. It will take years off your

learning curve.

Find a competent Pro to get you into some correct fitting golf clubs.


As much fun as it is to pound away with the driver, the majority of your practice should

be with your middle and short irons, chipping, pitching, and putting.

good luck and have fun
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 9:29:19 AM EST
Like swingset said.

DON'T KILL THE BALL. It was hard to fight the urge to slam the shit out of that little thing every time.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 9:41:22 AM EST
When I started, I was given the book "Golf for Dummies" by Gary McCord. I highly recommend this book. It goes over all the basics from grip and swing to course etiquette and equipment. Gary McCord is currently a commentator for CBS and a very funny writer so the book is not a dry "how-to".

As others have said, take lessons. Don't buy into the hype of all the infomercial gadgets. Get the basics down first.

and as always...enjoy the good walk spoiled...
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 9:45:03 AM EST
I was in the same situation about two years ago. $400 is a lot for a starter set; go to Dicks and pick up a starter set for about $200 in case you end up hating the sport.


+1 to Find a friend who can teach you the etiquette and have fun at the same time.

I shot my first 48 about two weeks ago (9 holes obviously). Not bad for a newbie.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 9:57:35 AM EST
Begin on the range. Don't try to learn the game on the course.

And start out with putting and chipping. I don't care if you can hit the ball 400 yards, if it takes you 10 more short shots or puts to get it in the hole, what was accomplished

"Drive for show, putt for dough"
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 10:23:20 AM EST

Originally Posted By Jon_C_:
Getting a pro should be somewhere around $75 for an hour, but you should be able to find one for less ($100 cover my brother and myself about a year ago). I'd start off with that. They'll show you proper grip, probably using a trainer grip and proper stance. If you start of with help it will help you more down the line, you won't have to unlearn bad habits.


Or community college or Parks & Rec. for $15 -- your call.
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 10:24:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By Bacchus:
I was in the same situation about two years ago. $400 is a lot for a starter set; go to Dicks and pick up a starter set for about $200 in case you end up hating the sport.


+1 to Find a friend who can teach you the etiquette and have fun at the same time.

I shot my first 48 about two weeks ago (9 holes obviously). Not bad for a newbie.


Very good! Well done!
How'd you do on the windmill?
Link Posted: 6/4/2008 10:32:41 AM EST

Originally Posted By Milquetoast:

Originally Posted By Bacchus:
I was in the same situation about two years ago. $400 is a lot for a starter set; go to Dicks and pick up a starter set for about $200 in case you end up hating the sport.


+1 to Find a friend who can teach you the etiquette and have fun at the same time.

I shot my first 48 about two weeks ago (9 holes obviously). Not bad for a newbie.


Very good! Well done!
How'd you do on the windmill?


I didn't get that far. The alligator on hole #3 ate the ball I was using.
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