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Posted: 8/31/2005 8:14:12 AM EDT
Why are these engineer types saying that it will take only days to get all the water out of NOLA? Even if the dykes get repaired soon, where are all the pumps going to come from, and where will they put the water?
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 8:31:35 AM EDT
There are already huge efficient pumps to put the water into lake Ponch, the problem is that the dike between the lake and the city is gone, so you can't get rid of hte water.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 8:38:49 AM EDT
There are already huge efficient pumps to put the water into lake Ponch, the problem is that the dike between the lake and the city is gone, so you can't get rid of hte water.




I wonder if all those pumps will still function after all this.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 8:54:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/31/2005 9:00:12 AM EDT by Keith_J]
It is DIKE! Dyke is slang for a female homo....

The pumps working at 100% will BARELY handle an inch of rain per hour...for only a few hours. It is not designed to dewater. Fuel will soon run out, leaving the pumps quiet.


The US Army Corps of Engineers is using NG heavy helicopters to drop Jersey barriers and SuperSacs of sand on the breaks. For those not familiar, Jersey barriers are 20 feet of concrete about 3 feet tall normally used for highway barriers. SuperSacs are huge bags, normally used for industrial handling of bulk materials. Some can hold more than a yard of material...about 3000 pounds.
Link Posted: 8/31/2005 9:04:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
It is DIKE! Dyke is slang for a female homo....

The pumps working at 100% will BARELY handle an inch of rain per hour...for only a few hours. It is not designed to dewater. Fuel will soon run out, leaving the pumps quiet.


The US Army Corps of Engineers is using NG heavy helicopters to drop Jersey barriers and SuperSacs of sand on the breaks. For those not familiar, Jersey barriers are 20 feet of concrete about 3 feet tall normally used for highway barriers. SuperSacs are huge bags, normally used for industrial handling of bulk materials. Some can hold more than a yard of material...about 3000 pounds.



It appears that none of this is working though.....They drop it in and it goes somewhere but makes little effect on the water coming in. They need a lot of material and need it quick. They keep talking about sinking a barge in the open area and then filling in on top but they have to get a barge, and then get it there.
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