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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/14/2005 12:23:02 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 12:41:54 AM EDT by PeteCO]
I am out of biannual and haven't flown in about 2 years. My medical is expired. Once I get my new medical this week, what all is involved in getting current again? I assume the CFI will drill me a bit on FAR/AIM stuff to make sure I still know it, but will it be as extensive as a checkride? What about typical flying time until he turns me loose? Just want to know what I am dealing with - 2 hours or 25 hours - that sort of thing.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 1:00:39 AM EDT
It will probably depend on how much your flying skills have deterioirated from the standard. [me]not current either [/me] I'd guess about 10 hours, depending on the CFI.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 1:18:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 1:23:39 AM EDT by Airwolf]
I didn't set foot in a GA aircraft between 1981 and 1999. Took me about 7 hours in the air to get signed off. The head work wasn't a big deal as I kept up on that. Most of it was just getting back to doing things without having to think about them twice.

I redid my IFR in 2001. Again, execpt for some unusual attitudes in during my BFR in 99 I handn't been on the gauges since 1980. Only took 3 hours for that one.

I used to be an instructor. If you're only 2 years out and know your FAR's, charts and POH you're not going to take too much time to get back up to speed. Figure a couple of hours, tops.

ETA: A couple hours *assuming* you have at least a few hundred before you stopped. If you just got your PPL and then walked away from it, you're probably going to need some work before a CFI would cut you loose.

Oh and it's NOT a checkride. It's a refresher. The CFI will work with you on things that you need help with, not go down the entire Practical Test Standards guide item by item.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 4:23:02 AM EDT
It took me three hours, It was fifteen years after my last flight.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 4:31:20 AM EDT
Went completely uncurrent in 2001, walked away with 5k+ hours, quit my airline job...I have no desire to fly again.

That being said, I have a friend who flies derigables for a living, he got all his ratings back in about 12 hours when he went uncurrent.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 5:43:07 AM EDT
Why did you walk away from your airline job?
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 5:58:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 6:00:30 AM EDT by TexasSIG]

Originally Posted By John Parker:
Why did you walk away from your airline job?



I walked away from one as well. It's not all it's cracked up to be.
Never home, union issues, scheduling nightmares, 2 tier pay scales.

There are better ways to make good money I found.

I do keep current though and fly for fun. It should not take
more than 4-6 hours for most people to get current again regardless
of how long it's been. The 152 is the moped of the sky......
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:17:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TexasSIG:

Originally Posted By John Parker:
Why did you walk away from your airline job?



I walked away from one as well. It's not all it's cracked up to be.
Never home, union issues, scheduling nightmares, 2 tier pay scales.

There are better ways to make good money I found.

I do keep current though and fly for fun. It should not take
more than 4-6 hours for most people to get current again regardless
of how long it's been. The 152 is the moped of the sky......



I just know that you're not bashing the 152. There are a whole boatload of airplanes I'd pass up for fun flying before the Cessnoid.

Back to the original question, I recall about 5 hours of dual after a 7 year layoff.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:19:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By samsi:
I just know that you're not bashing the 152. There are a whole boatload of airplanes I'd pass up for fun flying before the Cessnoid.

Back to the original question, I recall about 5 hours of dual after a 7 year layoff.



Oh, I owned one for a while back in the late 80's. They are what they are.....a hot cramped
moped in the sky........
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 6:48:39 AM EDT

Originally Posted By TexasSIG:

Originally Posted By samsi:
I just know that you're not bashing the 152. There are a whole boatload of airplanes I'd pass up for fun flying before the Cessnoid.

Back to the original question, I recall about 5 hours of dual after a 7 year layoff.



Oh, I owned one for a while back in the late 80's. They are what they are.....a hot cramped
moped in the sky........



Yeah, I suppose.

I'd really prefer an Extra or a Sukoi, even a T-6, but I can't seem to find a spare $200K lying around.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 8:49:12 AM EDT
I thought the license itself never expires?

You might need to get yourself a BFR and a current medical to log PIC time...which is what I'm sure you were talking about.

I think everyone else already hit the main points. It all depends on how quickly you can regain your skills back, everyone is different. It also depends on how much time you had before hand as well.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:07:21 AM EDT
Just spoke with a friend who hadn't flown in 3 years, he said he was signed off in 2.5 hours. Said it was like riding a bike. That's good - I figured I was in for some 30 hour debacle. Reading my Gleim manual right now to get reacquainted with stuff.

Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:21:26 AM EDT
In the Marine Corps, we flew the mission then b!tched and complained about it. Getting from point A to point B safely was #1. Fly the plane.

I operated for a small regional carrier, flying right seat, in 1900's in the NE. I then got hired as a PFE (as which I wanted for an Intl 121 Cargo ) on 747-2XX's.

I saw two fat old men in front of me who complained about anything and everything, all the time. No matter who the crew was. I was there to keep the whale in the sky and take care of her. I had (have) my A&P punched as well, so I could turn wrenchs if needed in BFE.

Observing constant infighting between the union, crew sched, and maint. was not for me.

If I was able to show up, sign and fly, I would still be doing it. It was 100% impossible not to get roped into the BS of the union. I also have/ had my dispacth lic. punched as well. I talked to some guys in Op's that say all the BS came to a point in op's and they said they are sick of it as well.

As observant in today's news a union would rather drive an airline into the ground and have the whole company go under than offer any concessions or think about the company 1st and not greedy members of the union who want to flex their politics in their own little unimportant world.

I was there to fly. I was not there to get chewed out because I jumped a nacelle open switch when it was manually locked closed and secured. I was not there to get frowned upon for not caring about the meals that got delivered to the plane or hotel accomodations and wanted to "show those guys" and take a delay.

It took me about 1 year to say forget it and about another 4 months to walk.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:40:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:
In the Marine Corps, we flew the mission then b!tched and complained about it. Getting from point A to point B safely was #1. Fly the plane.
{SNIP}
It took me about 1 year to say forget it and about another 4 months to walk.



Ziti, why didn't you keep your ticket? You could have flown GA with none of that BS, either professionally or recreationally.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:49:44 AM EDT
I didn't fly from 1990 until 2001... then stopped again.

The flying part wasn't hard at all. However, all the airspace designations changed during that time. ARSA, TRSA, TCA... all gone!

Looks like the only flying I'll be doing in the future is gliders (unless I can get a medical waiver for several conditions).
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 11:58:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 2_of_5:
I didn't fly from 1990 until 2001... then stopped again.

The flying part wasn't hard at all. However, all the airspace designations changed during that time. ARSA, TRSA, TCA... all gone!

Looks like the only flying I'll be doing in the future is gliders (unless I can get a medical waiver for several conditions).



Well, there is the new sport pilot certificate - no medical required, just a valid driver's license I think.
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 12:44:43 PM EDT
I was out of the airplane for about 18 months. Getting back in is so so easy.

I did about an hour of ground with CFI going over airspce and wx mins for each type. And some basic EPs.

We jummped in the plane and went through the checklist and then did about everything you would find on a checkride.
All said I spent 1.0 on ground instruction and 1.0 in the air.

Just go get it done and don't wait 10 years like some guys.

Best of luck,
Link Posted: 8/14/2005 1:54:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/14/2005 1:57:37 PM EDT by ZitiForBreakfast]

Originally Posted By PeteCO:

Originally Posted By ZitiForBreakfast:
In the Marine Corps, we flew the mission then b!tched and complained about it. Getting from point A to point B safely was #1. Fly the plane.
{SNIP}
It took me about 1 year to say forget it and about another 4 months to walk.



Ziti, why didn't you keep your ticket? You could have flown GA with none of that BS, either professionally or recreationally.


I let it all lapse, I just lost all interest I still have no desire. I miss flying being with my Marine brothers. Just something about Gen. Aviation, I did a few 150 and 152 and even some Citation II, III and V work.

There was so much more to flying then just steering and FE'ing that I enjoyed...the planning, the loading, the fueling, being self suffcient, briefing, ready rooms, maint, all of it made the job, different every day...
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