Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Posted: 6/22/2005 7:46:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/2/2005 10:30:20 PM EDT by lefthandblack]
Im getting a black Lab puppy in a couple of weeks and was wondering if anyone here has any firsthand experience with the breed and could offer some friendly advice. It will be my first dog, so I am pretty stoked and I know I will have my hands full. Thanks for any input.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:49:15 PM EDT
If you keep it inside, set your alarm to 3:30 am and wake up every nite to let it outside for the first month. After 3mos age it should be able to go through the whole night without having an accident. Run the hell out of it to tire it out. They are great dogs.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:49:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:
Im getting a black Lab puppy in a couple of weeks and was wondering if anyone here has any firsthand experience with the breed and could offer some friendly advice. It will be my first dog, so I am pretty stoked and I know I will have my hands full. Thanks for any input.



Name the dog "Meth"

"Meth Lab"

hehe





Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:49:35 PM EDT
Best advice I can give is to get a dog that 90 billion other people haven't owned. Practically every freakin' person and their brother owns a black lab. Buy a more unique breed!
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:51:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:
Best advice I can give is to get a dog that 90 billion other people haven't owned. Practically every freakin' person and their brother owns a black lab. Buy a more unique breed!



Why? Lets be different like everyone else?
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:52:19 PM EDT

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:

Originally Posted By roboman:
Best advice I can give is to get a dog that 90 billion other people haven't owned. Practically every freakin' person and their brother owns a black lab. Buy a more unique breed!



Why? Lets be different like everyone else?



Hey, to each his own. I try to get some of the lesser known breeds to increase their notoriety
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:52:41 PM EDT
In my experience expect at least 2 years of crazy, destructive dog... minimum.

After that you'll have an awesome pet.

YMMV,

-AG
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:53:20 PM EDT
Great dogs. Have had several registered ones. If you are planning to keep it inside, say goodbye to any nice furniture that you have. They only chew and tear up the good stuff. If you keep it outside, your backyard is gonna look like the moon in about a year. They finally settle down after about two years.
Only get one if you have time for it. You need to work with it and take them swimming. Otherwise they can get real destructive.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:54:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:

Originally Posted By roboman:
Best advice I can give is to get a dog that 90 billion other people haven't owned. Practically every freakin' person and their brother owns a black lab. Buy a more unique breed!



Why? Lets be different like everyone else?



Hey, to each his own. I try to get some of the lesser known breeds to increase their notoriety



Just get a mutt, free, happy as hell to be anywhere, sometimes they may be good for... something. Just dont know what...
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:55:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2005 7:56:38 PM EDT by sum-rifle]

Originally Posted By roboman:
Best advice I can give is to get a dog that 90 billion other people haven't owned. Practically every freakin' person and their brother owns a black lab. Buy a more unique breed!



That was bad advice because he is not thinking about getting a black lab, he is getting a black lab.
I say give it lots of room to run and play.
Do not over feed it there are lots of overweight labs out there.
Feed it a quality high protien food at first then after it is about a year old if it is getting too heavy cut back the amount of food. (Continue the high quality food not necessarily high protien)
If you plan on hunting with the dog give it alot of excercise and increase the amount and fat content at least 1 1/2 months before the start of the season.

Do not over do it on warm days, let the dog rest and make sure you give it plenty of clean water.
Love it and take care of it.
A collar and a tag is a must.
I also like the implanted micro-chip.

(I think that is what he was looking for roboman)
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:56:01 PM EDT
Black Labs are very curious, active, and stubborn. Patience is the key. House breaking them will take a little time, no more than with others puppies.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:56:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By roboman:

Originally Posted By IchWarrior:

Originally Posted By roboman:
Best advice I can give is to get a dog that 90 billion other people haven't owned. Practically every freakin' person and their brother owns a black lab. Buy a more unique breed!



Why? Lets be different like everyone else?



Hey, to each his own. I try to get some of the lesser known breeds to increase their notoriety



I have been looking at several different breeds like Giant Schnauzers, Black Russian Terriers, Staffordshire bull terriers, American Pit Bull terriers and I just think that the Labrador Retriever fits what I want in a companion animal the best. It is a Retriever and I am a hunter and also they have great temperments. I believe the reason that everyone has a Labrador and that they are the most popular breed in America is because they are just great all around dogs. Thanks for the input though.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 7:56:31 PM EDT
If you have anything of value in the yard you plan to keep him in, just go ahead and soak it down with gas and burn it. It will be somewhat quicker and much less aggrevating this way.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:03:12 PM EDT
OK...you're getting the best dog on earth, IMO.

Here's what you do:

Go to Petco or Petsmart and get one of the indoor kennels they sell....make sure you get the large or extra large version. He/she will love it as it becomes home for them and security while you're not there-while they're still a pup. It protects the house/carpet/furniture while you're gone. Put blankets, water, food and paper in there, and he'll go potty on the papers.

When you're shopping, spend a small fortune on chew toys...I'm talking hard rubber, Nylabones, balls, dental floss/tug rope toys...you name it. These dogs are incredibly active and playful. They will play until YOU wear out.

Get a Nylabone Frisbee and find a park to go play in....they are great at catching them and bringing them back-except you'll have to teach him to 'drop it' or 'leave it'.....they love tug-of-war. Normal frisbees are toast in one session afterwards, so get the Nylabone ones and they'll last much longer. Do NOT let the dog chew or play with the frisbee inside....when he sees you getting it out, he'll know that fun is just right around the corner.

Run the crap him everyday-for at least 45 minutes...they are working dogs and need exercise to be happy. Make sure you keep plenty of water around, and use only the best dog food. I fed mine Pro Plan, and it was terrific...but any high-quality food will suffice.

They are the greatest hunters I've ever seen, and if you are a bird hunter, make sure you get them used to shotgun blasts at a distance, then bring 'em in closer....it won't faze him.

They need lots of love, attention and think they're one of your kids.....you'll never go back once you have a Lab.

HH

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:03:40 PM EDT
Good advice guys, keep it comin!

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:07:46 PM EDT
Try to spend as much time as possible with her.

Cage train her, but DO NOT USE IT AS A "PUNISHMENT/TIME OUT" AREA FOR HER. My labby pup got VERY smart quick. She knew it was her little retreat and bed place. She amazingly knew "BED TIME TREAT" and would stop at nothing to get into her gage. After a while I didn't even have to say it, if I grabbed my keys to go to work, she'd run up into her cage. TRUST ME ya don't wanna be running late for work and have to try & wrangle in a doggy that does not wanna be caged.

Don't be afraid to discipline their asses, or they WILL walk all over you. Get multiple different chew toys; when she starts chomping on things she shouldn't, be firm and give her a chew to as a replacement. Change them out once in a while to keep her interest up.

I got a regular whistle, and bought steak bits and spent A LOT of time reinforcing that. She knows what "TREAT" means, but there's those desperate situations where she'll tear ass across my yard headed for god knows where. When I bust out the whistle she comes right back fully aware that she's getting the good stuff.

I also got a correction collar for her. I only use when I have people over, and I reward her when she reacts to it. I don't use it as a punishment tool. It really seemed to work.

one more thing. When I was working with her whether it was fetch, or simple commands, as soon as she deviated from the plan I imediately stopped, put her in the house and ignored her. This seemed to work.

Oh yea, HIDE EVERYTHING!! they WILL eat it.

Good luck & post pics!!
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:16:45 PM EDT
My bitch is 17 months old and she's finally starting to settle down. She weighs about 81 pounds. Like someone else said, run the shit out of her or him. Walk or run them 2-6 miles a day. I'm serious. It will help tire them out so they don't destroy your yard. Buy lots of toys. Giver her old shoes. A lab is like a baby, so be prepared. They are very demanding. They will eat anything, but buy the best food you can afford. We use science diet and her coat shimmers. Good luck!

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:18:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2005 8:26:03 PM EDT by Rocklock]

Originally Posted By Aggie_Gunner:
In my experience expect at least 2 years of crazy, destructive dog... minimum.

After that you'll have an awesome pet.

YMMV,

-AG



Exactly what I was going to say . Just love them to death , make them want to listen to you . They are chewers , but Willie is my best freind in the world hes 11 , now and has better manners than most "people" I know . Let them swim after tennis balls, and run crazy . Willie was and still is a runner if someone leaves the front door ajar (but he comes home in a couple hours and lets out a little "I'm back lemein" yap .Teaching him not to just bolt and be gone took awhile Id take him out and leash him to a big limb so he couldnt just flat haul ass. Once I thought he was gone for good as he disapeared over the horizon . But twenty mins. later he came back completly wore out foaming at the mouth and "cured" I think he just ran till he figured it out . BUT honestly most of his good behavior is just cause thats how he is . Once I convinced a lady I taught him to jump in and swim to the ball . I 'd just test him see if hes nuts about balls ......BUT THERE have been times I thought "god why did I ever get this mutt ." Just love them so much they just want to please you no matter what . and one more thing ....good luck

Ditto on the "crate" training they really do like having their own space . I do use it as a punishnment like when he comes back late at night . "Git in your crate right now"! He goes in there and takes a nap ! I was NOT a dog person till I ment Willie , I dont think I'll ever be w/o one now . They are great woods companions .
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:19:27 PM EDT
Pups are alot of fun, but have alot of patience with him/her.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:21:21 PM EDT
Labs will eat everything in the house, baseboards, tablelegs,etc. Give plenty of toys and attention.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:24:00 PM EDT
Black Labs are awesome dogs but because of their popularity they have been over bred and one must be very discerning about which breeder they choose. I strongly recommend that you research your potential litter's pedigree on the OFA website: linky and make sure the first 3 generations are well documented against hip dysplasia and elbow displasia.

In regards to picking a puppy out from a litter it is wise not to pick your pup until its 7 weeks old. a puppy is fully developed at 7 weeks and its traites will be established for life. A well experienced breeder can pick puppies at 6 weeks but they can change and prove that experienced breeder wrong.

I would strongly advise not getting a puppy [bringing it home] before its 7 weeks old either. Its important that it is with its littermates until then. There are things they will teach each other that is vital to their social development.

Lastly I would advise once your puppy is fully vaccinated [no matter how good of a dog trainer you are] that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class through pet smart, petco or the like. These classes help your puppy gain valuable social skills and helps you get on the right track to being your dog's leader.

Best of luck, Patty
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:35:05 PM EDT
Labs can also be very high-strung.. Very prone to separation anxiety.
If you have close neighbors or are an appartment dweller, be ready for complaints.. It will NOT like being left alone till it's about 2-3... Mellows out a bit afterwards. Obedience training is slower than with some other breeds, but they are FIERCELY loyal.

A Lab will be your bestest bud, ALWAYS greeting you with excessive attention, will hate to see you leave for work, but will play past the point of exhaustion with you if you're not mindful...

Fastastic choice, but you're going to put your time in..
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:36:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Black Labs are awesome dogs but because of their popularity they have been over bred and one must be very discerning about which breeder they choose. I strongly recommend that you research your potential litter's pedigree on the OFA website: linky and make sure the first 3 generations are well documented against hip dysplasia and elbow displasia.

In regards to picking a puppy out from a litter it is wise not to pick your pup until its 7 weeks old. a puppy is fully developed at 7 weeks and its traites will be established for life. A well experienced breeder can pick puppies at 6 weeks but they can change and prove that experienced breeder wrong.

I would strongly advise not getting a puppy [bringing it home] before its 7 weeks old either. Its important that it is with its littermates until then. There are things they will teach each other that is vital to their social development.

Lastly I would advise once your puppy is fully vaccinated [no matter how good of a dog trainer you are] that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class through pet smart, petco or the like. These classes help your puppy gain valuable social skills and helps you get on the right track to being your dog's leader.

Best of luck, Patty



Great advice, as always Patty.

I will add that labs are great dogs, very good dispositions and easily trained. Smart, active and playful. My avatar is a wonderful pet, loving and gentle. Great around kids and other animals, and a very alert watchdog.

That said, they shed like a MOFO, be prepared. They also have the same problems of other large breed dogs - hip dysplasia, eye and ear problems, etc. Make sure you buy from a reputable breeder, DO NOT buy a puppy from a store or a backyard breeder. Might look into adopting, or rescue too....that's where mine came from. Might not get a puppy, but you'll get a dog with a known disposition and do a great service too.

Start crate training, get some obedience classes going for you and the dog, and be willing to work a half hour a day on routine, commands and such for a while. It pays in dividends, trust me.

If you get a puppy, make sure you have lots of toys around, always. They do chew alot, but all puppies chew. Kongs & budda bones are great toys for chewers. Rawhide isn't the best stuff for dogs, but it works better than a shoe!



Good luck, make sure you post pics. Also, here's a great board about labs:

www.lab-retriever.net
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:42:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Black Labs are awesome dogs but because of their popularity they have been over bred and one must be very discerning about which breeder they choose. I strongly recommend that you research your potential litter's pedigree on the OFA website: linky and make sure the first 3 generations are well documented against hip dysplasia and elbow displasia.

In regards to picking a puppy out from a litter it is wise not to pick your pup until its 7 weeks old. a puppy is fully developed at 7 weeks and its traites will be established for life. A well experienced breeder can pick puppies at 6 weeks but they can change and prove that experienced breeder wrong.

I would strongly advise not getting a puppy [bringing it home] before its 7 weeks old either. Its important that it is with its littermates until then. There are things they will teach each other that is vital to their social development.

Lastly I would advise once your puppy is fully vaccinated [no matter how good of a dog trainer you are] that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class through pet smart, petco or the like. These classes help your puppy gain valuable social skills and helps you get on the right track to being your dog's leader.

Best of luck, Patty



Thanks for the advice. I am picking the puppy up when it is going to be about 8 and 1/2 weeks old. I have also researched his pedigree and everything is good. The sire of the litter is moving onto Master Hunter and hopefully soon will be the breed's next Champion/Master Hunter. He currently has 2 Master Hunter legs of the 5 needed to achieve the high level of an AKC Hunting Retriever title. I am also going to definitely sign up for a puppy class as it will be my first experience with a dog, so this will help. Thanks again everybody and keep it coming!

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:46:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
Black Labs are awesome dogs but because of their popularity they have been over bred and one must be very discerning about which breeder they choose. I strongly recommend that you research your potential litter's pedigree on the OFA website: linky and make sure the first 3 generations are well documented against hip dysplasia and elbow displasia.

In regards to picking a puppy out from a litter it is wise not to pick your pup until its 7 weeks old. a puppy is fully developed at 7 weeks and its traites will be established for life. A well experienced breeder can pick puppies at 6 weeks but they can change and prove that experienced breeder wrong.

I would strongly advise not getting a puppy [bringing it home] before its 7 weeks old either. Its important that it is with its littermates until then. There are things they will teach each other that is vital to their social development.

Lastly I would advise once your puppy is fully vaccinated [no matter how good of a dog trainer you are] that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class through pet smart, petco or the like. These classes help your puppy gain valuable social skills and helps you get on the right track to being your dog's leader.

Best of luck, Patty



Great advice, as always Patty.

I will add that labs are great dogs, very good dispositions and easily trained. Smart, active and playful. My avatar is a wonderful pet, loving and gentle. Great around kids and other animals, and a very alert watchdog.

That said, they shed like a MOFO, be prepared. They also have the same problems of other large breed dogs - hip dysplasia, eye and ear problems, etc. Make sure you buy from a reputable breeder, DO NOT buy a puppy from a store or a backyard breeder. Might look into adopting, or rescue too....that's where mine came from. Might not get a puppy, but you'll get a dog with a known disposition and do a great service too.

Start crate training, get some obedience classes going for you and the dog, and be willing to work a half hour a day on routine, commands and such for a while. It pays in dividends, trust me.

If you get a puppy, make sure you have lots of toys around, always. They do chew alot, but all puppies chew. Kongs & budda bones are great toys for chewers. Rawhide isn't the best stuff for dogs, but it works better than a shoe!



Good luck, make sure you post pics. Also, here's a great board about labs:

www.lab-retriever.net



Cool, thanks for the link, I will definitely check out that board. I have read that they are enthusiastic chewers to say the least. Thanks again!

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:52:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2005 8:53:36 PM EDT by viper5194]
I have a almost 2 year old Black Lab and a 8 month old Black Lab/Dane mix both picked up from a local rescue..., No regrets at all....
They are without a doubt the best dogs youll ever own. Keep LOTS and I mean LOTS of toys in your main seating area for them to play with. i have two wicker baskets, one on each side of my entertainment center FULL of chew toys, sqeeker toys and stuffed toys. . I have had it like this since Chey was a pup and now niether dog has touched a single piece of furnature. They get there fun from tearing up there own and not mine. if they even attempt to take or chew my items all it takes is me saying " Thats not yours" in a normal voice and they go find something else to do. Labs also like to have soft beds, at least mine do. i have several pet pillows around the house and they use them. It keep you from vacuuming or washing your bedding or couch alot and them layng on there beds also cuts down on the dog hair in your vacuum cleaner.

They are very intelegent dogs. To potty train Chey we hung small 1" bells from ribbon on the back door to the yard. Every time we let her out we rang the bells and told her outside. After about 2 weeks she got the hint and to this day still rings the bells on her own when she wants out. It can be the middle of the night and she will let you know she has to go. if you dont plan on breeding and have the dog fixed they do indeed settledown alot.... This IMO will help aid in training the dog.


They will also tear the piss outa your yard. We had to split out back yard in half to keep the street side of the yard looking good. We have a small green garden fence divideing the yard... One side looks like the moon, the other is plush with flora... When walking, labs like to pull ALOT... Try your hand with a item called a Gentle leader. Youll be amazed at the differance. Me and my GF work alot but Chey has learned to deal with it. She did get to a point where she seemed withdrawn so we decided to get her a friend. we got Jack the lab/dane mix and her life hasnt been the same since. first she was mom, the play toy, now there best friends. they go no where without one another and when one goes to bed, the other does as well... After about a year think about getting your dog a friend. You wont regret it. having one trained dog will aid in training the second...
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 8:57:42 PM EDT
We have a yellow lab pup. He was born in January and is a handfull! Luckily I am a stay at home mom and my husband is home evenings and weekends. If you are looking for a pet that can be left alone, get a cat.

We have been crate trainning him and keeping him on a strict diet. So far both seem to be working well. He is a naughty stinker when it comes to chewing and jumping up on people, but we are working on that one. We've only had him since April. He loves his kong and nylabones. Those I recomend. Teach him from day one to walk on a leash. Sure it is most fun for a dog to run free, but it is not always possilbe.

He is a great addition to our family and labs may be a common breed, but people want them for good reason. They are great dogs and do very well with children and other animals. Labs live to make you praise them.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:16:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thecleaner:
Try to spend as much time as possible with her.

Cage train her, but DO NOT USE IT AS A "PUNISHMENT/TIME OUT" AREA FOR HER. My labby pup got VERY smart quick. She knew it was her little retreat and bed place. She amazingly knew "BED TIME TREAT" and would stop at nothing to get into her gage. After a while I didn't even have to say it, if I grabbed my keys to go to work, she'd run up into her cage. TRUST ME ya don't wanna be running late for work and have to try & wrangle in a doggy that does not wanna be caged.

Don't be afraid to discipline their asses, or they WILL walk all over you. Get multiple different chew toys; when she starts chomping on things she shouldn't, be firm and give her a chew to as a replacement. Change them out once in a while to keep her interest up.

I got a regular whistle, and bought steak bits and spent A LOT of time reinforcing that. She knows what "TREAT" means, but there's those desperate situations where she'll tear ass across my yard headed for god knows where. When I bust out the whistle she comes right back fully aware that she's getting the good stuff.

I also got a correction collar for her. I only use when I have people over, and I reward her when she reacts to it. I don't use it as a punishment tool. It really seemed to work.

one more thing. When I was working with her whether it was fetch, or simple commands, as soon as she deviated from the plan I imediately stopped, put her in the house and ignored her. This seemed to work.

Oh yea, HIDE EVERYTHING!! they WILL eat it.

Good luck & post pics!!



That is interesting about the whistle. I will have to look into that. Thanks.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:23:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:

Thanks for the advice. I am picking the puppy up when it is going to be about 8 and 1/2 weeks old. I have also researched his pedigree and everything is good. The sire of the litter is moving onto Master Hunter and hopefully soon will be the breed's next Champion/Master Hunter. He currently has 2 Master Hunter legs of the 5 needed to achieve the high level of an AKC Hunting Retriever title. I am also going to definitely sign up for a puppy class as it will be my first experience with a dog, so this will help. Thanks again everybody and keep it coming!




Great! Don't forget to ask your breeder what they've been feeding your puppy and have that on hand. A big +1 on crate training. Labs are not suppose to be hyper or have seperation anxiety -- actually in all reality they SHOULD be the opposite so besure to spend time with your puppy.

Here's a link to a test I use to pick my pup: LINK

Patty
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:27:19 PM EDT
i am a professional retriever trainer and owner of muddydog retrievers in tulsa OK.

let me know if you need any help...

get a crate...
use it...
work the dog with bumpers...to exercise it. (remember..you cant take out 400 years of breeding for work)

strict OB..

rob aka muddydog
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:27:57 PM EDT
Koehler method, the one for regular dogs, not the one for guard dogs
Learn to speak dog........dogs are smarter than most people
learn how to train your dog to do just about anything
(of course if you want him to "bird" you need training specific to that)

If you don't want him\her to chew up stuff\dig you have to catch
him\her at the BEGINNING not AFTER he\she has developed the habit
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:30:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:

Thanks for the advice. I am picking the puppy up when it is going to be about 8 and 1/2 weeks old. I have also researched his pedigree and everything is good. The sire of the litter is moving onto Master Hunter and hopefully soon will be the breed's next Champion/Master Hunter. He currently has 2 Master Hunter legs of the 5 needed to achieve the high level of an AKC Hunting Retriever title. I am also going to definitely sign up for a puppy class as it will be my first experience with a dog, so this will help. Thanks again everybody and keep it coming!




Great! Don't forget to ask your breeder what they've been feeding your puppy and have that on hand. A big +1 on crate training. Labs are not suppose to be hyper or have seperation anxiety -- actually in all reality they SHOULD be the opposite so besure to spend time with your puppy.

Here's a link to a test I use to pick my pup: LINK

Patty



Great link, I will look into that, thanks.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:31:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2005 9:34:06 PM EDT by AshNH]
When my Labby was a puppy someone gave us the tip of keeping frozen carrots in the freezer for when he started teething. It serves many good purposes ... 1. It's cold so it soothes the gums. 2. It's hard, so it helps the chewing urge, and keeps him from chewing on other things. 3. It tastes good, so it will be something that the dog would rather chew on.

We did this, and carrots have remained my dogs favorite treat. Put one next to a piece of bacon, he takes the carrot every time (but he will come back looking for that bacon after he's done). They're cheap, better for the dog, and help keep the teeth clean as they get older which leads to better smelling dog breath.

Oh, and another thing ... if you decide to let your puppy sleep on your bed with you at night, be prepared to have him there forever ... mine still is ... all 80 pounds of him.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:31:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By muddydog:
i am a professional retriever trainer and owner of muddydog retrievers in tulsa OK.

let me know if you need any help...

get a crate...
use it...
work the dog with bumpers...to exercise it. (remember..you cant take out 400 years of breeding for work)

strict OB..

rob aka muddydog



Thanks for the info, what exactly are bumpers? Thanks again.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:33:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AshNH:
When my Labby was a puppy someone gave us the tip of keeping frozen carrots in the freezer for when he started teething. It serves many good purposes ... 1. It's cold so it soothes the gums. 2. It's hard, so it helps the chewing urge, and keeps him from chewing on other things. 3. It tastes good, so it will be something that the dog would rather chew on.

We did this, and carrots have remained my dogs favorite treat. Put one next to a piece of bacon, he takes the carrot every time (but he will come back looking for that bacon after he's done). They're cheap, better for the dog, and help keep the teeth clean as they get older which leads to better smelling dog breath.



Cool, good idea. Thanks.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:47:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:

Originally Posted By muddydog:
i am a professional retriever trainer and owner of muddydog retrievers in tulsa OK.

let me know if you need any help...

get a crate...
use it...
work the dog with bumpers...to exercise it. (remember..you cant take out 400 years of breeding for work)

strict OB..

rob aka muddydog



Thanks for the info, what exactly are bumpers? Thanks again.




Bumpers are the rubber toys you throw to work on retrieving skills. Patty
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:51:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:

Originally Posted By muddydog:
i am a professional retriever trainer and owner of muddydog retrievers in tulsa OK.

let me know if you need any help...

get a crate...
use it...
work the dog with bumpers...to exercise it. (remember..you cant take out 400 years of breeding for work)

strict OB..

rob aka muddydog



Thanks for the info, what exactly are bumpers? Thanks again.




Bumpers are the rubber toys you throw to work on retrieving skills. Patty



Ahhhh, right on, thanks.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 9:54:46 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By lefthandblack:

Originally Posted By muddydog:
i am a professional retriever trainer and owner of muddydog retrievers in tulsa OK.

let me know if you need any help...

get a crate...
use it...
work the dog with bumpers...to exercise it. (remember..you cant take out 400 years of breeding for work)

strict OB..

rob aka muddydog



Thanks for the info, what exactly are bumpers? Thanks again.




Bumpers are the rubber toys you throw to work on retrieving skills. Patty



Ahhhh, right on, thanks.




Tennis balls work just fine too....and they're easier to throw and replace.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 10:41:32 PM EDT
Some good advice here on using a crate and checking out OFA on for hips and elbows. CERF is also a good thing to check. I hunt so I like to get dogs from proven field trial and hunt test lines. I have three labs and I could leave any of them in the house alone and things would be fine when I got home. Probably the first year with each dog we never had them in the house unsupervised and we got after them for doing anything we did not like. I had one puppy that was trained to go to the door to relieve himself in just a few days. He has been one smart dog and very easy to train.

My advice to you is do not be afraid to spend some money for a good dog. I would plan on spending $500 to $1000. I think someone already responded to you that is a pro. Talk to them see what they have to say. Do a reality check with another pro and see if they concur on the breeding. The initial cost of the dog is very little compared to 10-15 years of taking care of the dog. I would much rather have a smart dog than a stupid dog!!

There is a reason so many people have Labs. They are fantastic dogs!!!

Enjoy your new adventure. If you hunt it opens up a whole new world to you!!

Steve
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 10:42:43 PM EDT
get a dobermen pinscher
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 10:57:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/22/2005 10:57:36 PM EDT by Confederate]
I currently have a black lab, and have had black and yellow labs in the past. The main thing I would get would be a small swimming pool from Wal-Mart, they only run around twenty bucks or so and I promise you it will be the best thing you can give your lab. Labs LOVE WATER. Enjoy!! (by the way you may want to get yourself some Valium)..
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 11:24:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Retzam:
get a dobermen pinscher



Live expecantcy = 9 years.

Labrador life expectancy = 12 years.

Hate to be crass, but that's 3 more years of a friend's company.
Link Posted: 6/22/2005 11:38:40 PM EDT
CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW CHEW



Had a couple, meself. haha..... Forget about having anything nice for a while.

Link Posted: 6/22/2005 11:52:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Sandguard:
My bitch is 17 months old and she's finally starting to settle down. She weighs about 81 pounds. Like someone else said, run the shit out of her or him. Walk or run them 2-6 miles a day. I'm serious. It will help tire them out so they don't destroy your yard. Buy lots of toys. Giver her old shoes. A lab is like a baby, so be prepared. They are very demanding. They will eat anything, but buy the best food you can afford. We use science diet and her coat shimmers. Good luck!





NEVER give a dog your old shoes..........

Very bad advice. They can NOT distinguish between the ones YOU give them, and your GOOD shoes. Sooner or later, they'll chew a good pair to shit on you and you'll have nobody to blame but yourself....

Ask any trainer and they'll tell you the same. I'm sure Pattymcn will back me up on that, and she rasies german short-haired pointers professionally.

That plus they can easily choke to death on any pieces they may tear off, or it can get lodged in their intestinal track and kill the dog VERY painfully, if you don't catch it in time.

Not a good idea at all... If you do this, stop right away, for your dog's sake.
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 5:39:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/23/2005 5:44:02 AM EDT by Sandguard]

Originally Posted By JB69:

Originally Posted By Sandguard:
My bitch is 17 months old and she's finally starting to settle down. She weighs about 81 pounds. Like someone else said, run the shit out of her or him. Walk or run them 2-6 miles a day. I'm serious. It will help tire them out so they don't destroy your yard. Buy lots of toys. Giver her old shoes. A lab is like a baby, so be prepared. They are very demanding. They will eat anything, but buy the best food you can afford. We use science diet and her coat shimmers. Good luck!





NEVER give a dog your old shoes..........

Very bad advice. They can NOT distinguish between the ones YOU give them, and your GOOD shoes. Sooner or later, they'll chew a good pair to shit on you and you'll have nobody to blame but yourself....

Ask any trainer and they'll tell you the same. I'm sure Pattymcn will back me up on that, and she rasies german short-haired pointers professionally.

That plus they can easily choke to death on any pieces they may tear off, or it can get lodged in their intestinal track and kill the dog VERY painfully, if you don't catch it in time.

Not a good idea at all... If you do this, stop right away, for your dog's sake.



Great advice. Here's a picture of the dog I tried to kill.



What she has eaten so far w/o choking:

My patio furniture cushions
1/2 cord of cherry wood
my sons shoe
my other sons hat
my cell phone
the house phone
her swimming pool
her swimming pool again
the step to my hot tub
a broom handle
the neighbor's soccer ball
all of my plastic sprinklers
beer cans
water bottles
a bike seat
my deck rail caps
my BBQ racks
to be continued...
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 6:14:33 AM EDT
Tagged, looking to get a black lab this summer/fall.

Kharn
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 6:38:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Confederate:
I currently have a black lab, and have had black and yellow labs in the past. The main thing I would get would be a small swimming pool from Wal-Mart, they only run around twenty bucks or so and I promise you it will be the best thing you can give your lab. Labs LOVE WATER. Enjoy!! (by the way you may want to get yourself some Valium)..



My parents have always has a kids pool for our black lab. Anytime it is hot out or she just got back from a walk so runs right over and lays in the pool. It is hard to keep her out of any water. My lab was chewing everything for the first year and a half of her life and then she just stopped and turned into the most well behaved dog. She chewed through a wooden door one day.
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 6:50:07 AM EDT
Lots of good advice here. Inside dog? HIDE YOUR SHOES. If you keep it in the kitchen, paint your outside corner base molding with tabasco and it won't gnaw it. I used Water Dog by Richard Wolters to train my Boykin. He's hell on wheels for duck/dove. Wish I could have used him on pheasant, he flushes pretty well.
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 6:50:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/23/2005 6:51:29 AM EDT by bigbore]
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 7:09:22 AM EDT
bigbore, who says dogs can't talk? "Where's dinner?"
Link Posted: 6/23/2005 7:10:19 AM EDT
Oh yea, they're also big fat attention whores too!

Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 3
Top Top