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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 10/5/2004 12:16:39 PM EST
LITTLE KNOWN NAVAL HISTORY:

The U.S.S. Constitution (Old Ironsides), as a combat vessel carried 48,600 gallons of fresh water for her crew of 475 officers and men. This was sufficient to last six months of sustained operations at sea. She carried no evaporators (fresh water distillers).

However, let it be noted that according to her log, "On July 27, 1798, the U.S.S. Constitution sailed from Boston with a full complement of 475 officers and men, 48,600 gallons of fresh water, 7,400 cannon shot, 11,600 pounds of black powder and 79,400 gallons of rum." Her mission: "To destroy and harass English shipping."

Making Jamaica on 6 October, she took on 826 pounds of flour and 68,300 gallons of rum.

Then she headed for the Azores, arriving there 12 November. She provisioned with 550 pounds of beef and 64,300 gallons of Portuguese wine.

On 18 November, she set sail for England. In the ensuing days she defeated five British men-of-war and captured and scuttled 12 English merchantmen, salvaging only the rum aboard each. By 26 January, her powder and shot were exhausted.

Nevertheless, and though unarmed, she made a night raid up the Firth of Clyde in Scotland. Her landing party captured a whiskey distillery and transferred 40,000 gallons of single malt Scotch aboard by dawn. Then she headed home.

The U.S.S. Constitution arrived in Boston on 20 February 1799, with no cannon shot, no food, no powder, NO rum, NO wine, NO whiskey and 38,600 gallons of stagnant water.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 12:24:26 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 12:27:06 PM EST
hehe

too bad we're dry now :(

Link Posted: 10/5/2004 12:32:03 PM EST
I wasn't aware Ironsides was ever "unarmed". Not to mention they seemed to drink the shit out of rum. When you provision more rum than water, it must be a party.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 12:33:07 PM EST
Yep - and I was a sailor a hundred and sixty-eight years too late as well
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 1:00:19 PM EST

Originally Posted By 4get_No1:
Yep - and I was a sailor a hundred and sixty-eight years too late as well


ditto
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 1:35:30 PM EST
LoL! I think that came out of the book, On Seas Of Glory by John Lehman.

He graduated from my high school, and came back in winter 2002 to be inducted into the hall of fame.

That story, or one like it was part of his remarks...

When we re-aired those remarks a few days later, our TV moderator made us EDIT THE STORY OUT, because we can't encourage binge drinking.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 1:41:50 PM EST
Then you should move to canada or england. Can't remeber which one. Pretty sure it was canada where the sailors invited us over to there ship for drinks since we couldn't drink on ours.
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 2:58:21 PM EST
A toast...to the United States Navy!
Link Posted: 10/5/2004 4:49:44 PM EST
So... in 7 months, each man consumed an average of 530 gallons of booze.

76 gallons per month.

2.5 gallons per day.

13.5 shots (1 shot=1 fl oz) PER HOUR, 24 HOURS A DAY.


All I can say is that gallons must have been different back then, or the alcohol was 10 proof...
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 5:27:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By 87gn:
So... in 7 months, each man consumed an average of 530 gallons of booze.

76 gallons per month.

2.5 gallons per day.

13.5 shots (1 shot=1 fl oz) PER HOUR, 24 HOURS A DAY.


All I can say is that gallons must have been different back then, or the alcohol was 10 proof...



Maybe they were trying to avoid hangovers by staying drunk?
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 5:32:04 AM EST
I think ships rum back then was a watered down, but still. Even if it were just equal to beer, WOW!
Link Posted: 10/6/2004 6:16:37 AM EST
I will drink a toast of fine rum tonight with the verbage " Go Navy " .
The Navy made me the man I am today and I was never served in the Navy.
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