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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/14/2005 1:41:27 AM EDT


news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20050913/tc_nm/autos_gm_onstar_dc

GM pitches "smart" cars to cut back on discounts

Tue Sep 13, 2:19 PM ET

General Motors Corp. (NYSE:GM - news), trying to wean itself off huge discounts to draw customers into showrooms, is pitching the idea that its vehicles are "smart" enough to tell you how they're doing.

Under the strategy, outlined at a news conference on Tuesday, GM said it would perform hundreds of diagnostic checks on vehicles equipped with its OnStar satellite-based communications system automatically every month.

Through the OnStar global positioning device and technology embedded in most GM vehicles since the 2004 model year, GM was already capable of performing diagnostic checks on vehicles by remote control, when their owners requested them.

Now, U.S. customers who sign up for OnStar Vehicle Diagnostics, which is free, will have a battery of tests done automatically and get an e-mail generated by their own vehicle roughly every 30 days, GM executives said.

They said the e-mails would include feedback on a car's engine, transmission, anti-lock brakes, air bags and other vital vehicle systems.

The e-mails will also include reminders about when a vehicle is due for oil changes or other scheduled service, when customers actually have to pay a visit their local dealership.

"It's all about safety, security, peace of mind," OnStar President Chet Huber told reporters. "People really value that the vehicle is smart enough to help them like this."

Huber and Mark LaNeve, GM's head of marketing and sales for North America, both said the service was expected to boost customer appreciation of OnStar, which GM will soon offer as standard equipment in all its vehicles.

It is also a clear bet that safety and enhanced vehicle content can sell. GM is trying to cut cash rebates and other consumer incentives, which have squeezed its profit margins, as it rolls out new vehicles for the 2006 model year.

"This will be one more vehicle differentiating characteristic," said Huber.

OnStar's features include automatic alerting of emergency services when air bags are deployed, the ability to assist authorities in locating stolen vehicles, and remote unlocking of doors when keys are left inside.

OnStar is offered free of charge to GM's retail car buyers for the first year, and costs $199 a year after that. GM says about 65 percent of its customers opt to keep the service.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 2:24:37 AM EDT
As if I needed another reason to never buy a General Motors turd vehicle.

There's no big brother BS on my vehicles, never will be.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 3:27:47 AM EDT
OnStar is an option.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 3:34:35 AM EDT
Fuck that!
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 3:52:53 AM EDT
here come the tin foil hats.....

Link Posted: 9/14/2005 3:56:19 AM EDT
hahaha, having the mfg tell you when things "need replaced"
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 3:56:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:06:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:
As if I needed another reason to never buy a General Motors turd vehicle.

There's no big brother BS on my vehicles, never will be.



So you don't intend to buy any vehicle made after 2000?
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:17:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
That's pretty cool.



Yep.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:28:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RED_5:
hahaha, having the mfg tell you when things "need replaced"



Believe it or not, that is a GOOD thing.

Why? Because lots of people don't pay attention to their cars. They skip service intervals and ignore the check engine light until the thing half dies, and then they complain that the car is a piece of crap because American car companies don't know how to make quality vehicles.

They then proceed to kill Hondas and wonder why.

Some people really DO need to have mail sent to them saying "HEY IDIOT! CHANGE YOUR DAMN OIL!!" or "THE ENGINE COMPUTER IS REPORTING A TROUBLE CODE! HOW ABOUT GETTING THAT CHECKED OUT BEFORE YOU KILL IT!"

It is a pretty good approach especially if you are not a car geek like me who has his own code scanner and who notices every little thing the car does.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:42:25 AM EDT
I will not buy a GM car because of their onstar. Buy Dodge.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:42:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Oslow:
OnStar is an option.



]
OnStar is currently on optin. Starting next years or so it will be on all cars.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:44:24 AM EDT
I think this is a great feature and only the tin-foil club will object.

Link Posted: 9/14/2005 4:57:00 AM EDT
A good option for folks who don't know anything about their vehicles... and a great new revenue stream for GM. Sell the sizzle, not the steak!
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 5:02:37 AM EDT
Also giving away free Heartbeat of America jackets to the first 5000 callers, 1-800-GM-TRUCK.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 5:04:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Mojo_Jojo:
A good option for folks who don't know anything about their vehicles... and a great new revenue stream for GM. Sell the sizzle, not the steak!



I own a couple of GMC vehicles.

They have been superbly reliable over their lifetime.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 5:05:22 AM EDT
That's a waste of time and technology. If some people are already ignoring a Check Engine Light, what makes you think an email is going to help. These people will ignore that as well. I think it's just another marketing strategy to draw new customers and then get them into the shop for repair$, GM is already in trouble as a company.

Plus it puts them one step closer to completely controlling the driver and his vehicle, that's BS.
Today's cars already have enough electronic devices on them that most home mechanics have to bring it in to a shop, how about scrapping the control trip that mafgs are on and build a dependable car that doesn't need to be scanned remotely because it's already running properly.

Giving a layman a description of a trouble code won't do any good, what are they supposed to do, drop everything and run to the dealer with tail between thier legs. Sounds like a fear tactic to me, throw some technical sentences at the customer and it sounds realy serious, they are going to pump fear into old women and people who don't know much about modern cars, that would make even a tivial problem seem imporant. They want to get you by the balls.

Besides, some people don't care about touble codes, CEL's etc. as long as the car still runs. I don't expect this to cange the way they handle care care. You have two types of car owners out there, one that does preventive maintenance and fixes his car right away when there's a problem, and the other guy, the one who drives the car until it breaks down, we get a lot of those, they come in on the hook. Nothing will help the latter, and the former doesn't need help so you see this is all a marketing strategy. They want to train new customers now, get them used to coming to the dealer for overpriced, and sometimes underskilled, labor. Get them coming in now so when it becomes mandatory -which is every car mfgs dream, they had to be forced by lawsuits to release info to the independant mechanics- it won't be a surprise.

Ok maybee that last sentence was a little tin-foilish, but they WANT to make it manatory, they just can't. What they are doing however, is making cars so specific that very expensive diagnostic technology must be used to diagnose, in an attempt to push out the independant who may not have the means to buy it, but it won't work, AND HASN'T WORKED YET.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 6:48:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By oneshot1kill:
That's a waste of time and technology. If some people are already ignoring a Check Engine Light, what makes you think an email is going to help. These people will ignore that as well. I think it's just another marketing strategy to draw new customers and then get them into the shop for repair$, GM is already in trouble as a company.



It is in the interest of GM to do all they can to ensure that customers service the vehicles regularly and deal with problems in their infancy, rather than run up huge problems and then irrationally blame GM for those problems, as MANY do.



Plus it puts them one step closer to completely controlling the driver and his vehicle, that's BS.
Today's cars already have enough electronic devices on them that most home mechanics have to bring it in to a shop, how about scrapping the control trip that mafgs are on and build a dependable car that doesn't need to be scanned remotely because it's already running properly.



Cars today run far better than they ever have, for far longer than they ever have. I know there are some who get ticked off that there isn't a carburetor on their vehicle any more, but the trade off is that now your car will actually START when it is supposed to most of the time, as opposed to flooding out constantly or refusing to run on a cold day.



Giving a layman a description of a trouble code won't do any good, what are they supposed to do, drop everything and run to the dealer with tail between thier legs. Sounds like a fear tactic to me, throw some technical sentences at the customer and it sounds realy serious, they are going to pump fear into old women and people who don't know much about modern cars, that would make even a tivial problem seem imporant. They want to get you by the balls.



My 2001 Intrepid RT recently popped up a trouble code. One that made no sense whatsoever. The scanner couldn't even pin it down.

Turns out the computer itself had fried a circuit, which at any time could have shorted out the entire engine electrical system.

The car, however, ran just fine. But who knows how long it would have stayed that way.

Computers are funny critters. They can do amazing stuff. When they start to go bad, however, you need to adress the problem as soon as possible to avoid major problems later.



Besides, some people don't care about touble codes, CEL's etc. as long as the car still runs.



And those are the people who complain that GMs are "shit". You fail to take care of the car, the car WILL fail you too.

Not to mention that a lot of the problems that people ignore can manifest as serious safety issues. Say brake fluid pressure. If you have a sensor that detects below normal brake pressure and sends out an e-mail alert to the owner, it might save them from a serious accident.



Ok maybee that last sentence was a little tin-foilish, but they WANT to make it manatory, they just can't. What they are doing however, is making cars so specific that very expensive diagnostic technology must be used to diagnose, in an attempt to push out the independant who may not have the means to buy it, but it won't work, AND HASN'T WORKED YET.



In case you didn't know, there are computer standards that all car manufacturers who sell in the US MUST obey by law, and there is certain techincal data that they are REQUIRED to make available specifically so folks like independent mechanics can still get working computer diagnostic equipment and still make repairs.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 6:53:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NoVaGator:
I think this is a great feature and only the tin-foil club will object.




Its that FBI listening in thing.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 7:17:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2005 7:18:07 AM EDT by HardShell]

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:
I own a couple of GMC vehicles.

They have been superbly reliable over their lifetime.



+1

My wife's '03 Envoy XL (like it a lot!) has On*Star, and it's hands-free "cellular" service has come in handy a few times in areas where we had no cell coverage (haven't locked the keys in it or anything like that... yet). That's the only vehicle that "Junior" travels in & I like having the service for long trips (or any trips of any length they might make without me. ).

My '99 Sonoma has been a great little truck - I wouldn't have minded if it had been equipped with On*Star from the get-go, but I probably wouldn't have continued the service after the free first year.

I just can't seem to get all worked up over the tin-foil implications of any of this. Maybe I should, but I can't...
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 7:25:19 AM EDT
Does the emergency call work if you are not a subscriber?
What kind of liability would that open up if you call and request an ambulance, but they aren't able to help you?
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 7:32:26 AM EDT
Well..... hand me a roll of foil. I'll just keep my 1994 truck running as long as I possibly can. I know some people really like the 'service"; and my wife thinks I am a bit on the lunatic fringe about this too. But damn, OnStar, really creeps me out.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 7:35:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RED_5:
hahaha, having the mfg tell you when things "need replaced"



"Oh, and that's a wear & tear item, not covered by the warranty..."

No thanks, GM. How's about making a car that lasts like a Honda? How's about a car where you can actually SEE the power steering reservoir to be able to fill it? How about a little gas mileage improvement?

I quit buying Ford because they spent millions of dollars "tuning" the exhasut sound of the new F-150. You know, if you want tuned exhaust you get Flowmasters. I could care less so I refuse to pay for that "research". Meanwhile my current Ford is getting 13 MPG...

And they wonder why the Japanese are kicking their asses.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 7:37:02 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tisfortexas:
Also giving away free Heartbeat of America jackets to the first 5000 callers, 1-800-GM-TRUCK.




Well, that's going to be an interesting line item on my company's phone bill.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 8:43:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2005 8:45:14 AM EDT by lippo]
I work for GM, I have a Onstar in my car and I will not purchase another. Or I will have it taken out. Not only were they worthless when I needed directions, they can also listen in on your conversations without you knowing about it.


It will come to this...

Onstar and these things are NOT good. Why don't they just tattoo a 666 on everyones foreheads?






VeriChip is a subsidiary of Applied Digital and provides state-of-the-art security solutions that identify, locate, and protect people, their assets, and their environments. From the world's first and only FDA-cleared, human-implantable RFID microchip to the only active RFID tag with patented skin sensing capabilities, VeriChip's technology ensures the safety and security organizations are looking for. Its market-leading infant protection, wander prevention, asset tracking, and patient identification applications make VeriChip the predominant RFID solutions provider in the healthcare industry. And today, VeriChip systems are installed in over 4,000 locations worldwide in healthcare, security, industrial, and government markets making it the world's premier RFID company for people.

VeriChip History

The roots of VeriChip trace back to the events of September 11, 2001 when New York firemen were writing their badge ID numbers on their chests in case they were found injured or unconscious. It was evident there was a desparate need for personal information in emergency situations and that an injectable RFID microchip could help patients.

Working closely with Applied Digital, VeriChip was created as a wholly-owned subsidiary in December 2001 to produce and market the implantable device (also known as "VeriChip™"). The company received FDA approval for the device in medical applications in December 2004 and today, many people around the world have been implanted. In addition, several leading medical centres including Beth Israel Deaconess and Hackensack University, have agreed to use the technology in their emergency departments with other facilities currently in talks with VeriChip.

In April 2005, VeriChip extended its RFID innovation and offerings by acquiring eXI Wireless Inc., a leader in infant protection, wander prevention, and asset tracking solutions based on non-implantable RFID technology. This was followed by the acquisition of Instantel (and its Xmark Systems group) in June 2005, a market leader in RFID-based healthcare security and vibration monitoring systems for regulated vibration control. With these acquisitions and the success to date of the FDA-cleared, human-implantable microchip, VeriChip has solidified its position as the world's premier RFID company for people offering the widest range of RFID solutions (i.e. implantable, wearable, and attachable) and proven leadership in multiple markets.



www.verichipcorp.com/



VeriChip Corporation Appoints Former Secretary of Health & Human Services and Former Governor of Wisconsin Tommy G. Thompson to Its Board of Directors


Thursday July 7 2005 - DELRAY BEACH, Fla., Jul 07, 2005 -- VeriChip Corporation, a subsidiary of Applied Digital (NASDAQ:ADSX), announced today that Tommy G. Thompson, former Health & Human Services (HHS) Secretary and former Governor of Wisconsin, was appointed to the Company's Board of Directors. With nearly 40 years of his career devoted to public service, Secretary Thompson is recognized as a dedicated advocate for the health and welfare of all Americans. In his role as a member of the Board, Secretary Thompson is expected to help the Company accelerate adoption of the VeriChip for healthcare and security applications.


"We are pleased that we have been able to attract such a highly respected member of the healthcare community," said Scott R. Silverman, Chairman and CEO of Applied Digital. "An important part of our strategy has been to attract key thought and opinion leaders, and Secretary Thompson has played an influential role in shaping this country's healthcare policies. We look forward to him assisting the Company to make the VeriChip an important part of the healthcare landscape."

Commenting on his appointment, Secretary Thompson stated, "We are all well aware of the need to enhance Information Technology in healthcare. It is my belief that VeriChip is an important and secure means of accessing medical records and other information. I look forward to working with the company as it continues its growth."

Secretary Thompson has dedicated his professional life to public service, most recently serving as governor of Wisconsin from 1987 through 2000. He made state history when he was re-elected to office for a third term in 1994 and a fourth term in 1998. Secretary Thompson began his career in public service in 1966 as a representative in Wisconsin's state Assembly. He was elected assistant Assembly minority leader in 1973 and Assembly minority leader in 1981. Secretary Thompson received both his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

About VeriChip
VeriChip is a subsidiary of Applied Digital and the only company to provide both implanted and external RFID security solutions for people, their assets, and their environments. From the world's first and only FDA-cleared, human-implantable RFID microchip to the only patented active RFID tag with skin-sensing capabilities, VeriChip leads the way in next-generation RFID technologies. Today, over 3,000 installations worldwide in healthcare, security, industrial, and government markets benefit from both the protection and efficiencies provided by VeriChip systems. For more information on VeriChip, please visit www.verichipcorp.com.

About Applied Digital
Applied Digital develops innovative security products for consumer, commercial, and government sectors worldwide. The Company's unique and often proprietary products provide security for people, animals, the food supply, government/military arena, and commercial assets. Included in this diversified product line are RFID applications, end-to-end food safety systems, GPS/Satellite communications, and telecomm and security infrastructure, positioning Applied Digital as the leader of Security Through Innovation. Applied Digital is the owner of a majority position in Digital Angel Corporation (AMEX:DOC).

Statements about the Company's future expectations, including future revenues and earnings, and all other statements in this press release other than historical facts are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and as that term is defined in the Private Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change at any time, and the Company's actual results could differ materially from expected results. The Company undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequently occurring events or circumstances.

Contact: CEOcast, Inc. for Applied Digital Ken Sgro, 212-732-4300, kensgro@ceocast.com


Link Posted: 9/14/2005 8:44:53 AM EDT
this is why I have my own diagnostic computer, service manuals and suggested service intervals
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 9:04:54 AM EDT
Well, guess I am never buying a new GM then..... I am pretty sure I cna manage the 5K oil checks on my own, changing U joints, rebuilding engines, trannies and the like, I have only been doing it since I was 9



I hate all this nanny BS, liek my Ford chirping at me if I don't put on the Seat Belt, and it continues chirping for 20 damned minutes, makes it real fun out hunting, at the marina, hauling firewood back to camp etc.



Car makers are putting lawyer options on vehicles just liek Winchester and Marlin
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 9:08:10 AM EDT
The Army is spending a good deal of money to develop these systems as well, to reduce downtime. Imagine rolling back in from a mission and the mechanics already have your parts wating to be installed.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 9:13:02 AM EDT
It is only a matter of time before they start tracking oil changes, etc... and using that to calculate your resale value when you go to buy a new car.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 9:58:50 AM EDT
I can tell you this, owners will be getting ALOT of emails. The GM's Ive owned and my family have owned all were POS trucks.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 10:32:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Leisure_Shoot:
It is only a matter of time before they start tracking oil changes, etc... and using that to calculate your resale value when you go to buy a new car.



Good news for those of us who properly maintain our vehicles, eh?
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 10:51:44 AM EDT
Hal:
Just what do you think you're doing, Dave?...Dave...
I really think I'm entitled to an answer to that question...
I know everything hasn't been quite right with me, but I can assure you now, very confidently, that it's going to be alright again...
I feel much better now, I really do...Look, Dave, I can see you're really upset about this...
I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill and think things over...
I know I've made some very poor decisions recently, but I can give you my complete assurance that my work will be back to normal...
I've still got the greatest enthusiasm and confidence in the mission, and I want to help you...
Dave...stop...stop, will you...stop, Dave...will you stop, Dave...stop, Dave...
I'm afraid...I'm afraid, Dave...Dave...my mind is going...I can feel it...I can feel it...my mind is going...there is no question about it...
I can feel it...I can feel it...I can feel it...(slows down) I'm afraid...

Good afternoon, gentlemen. I am a HAL 9000 computer. I became operational at the H.A.L. plant in Urbana, Illinois, on the 12th January 1992. My instructor was Mr Langley, and he taught me to sing a song. If you'd like to hear it, I can sing it for you.


Link Posted: 9/14/2005 10:55:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2005 11:01:06 AM EDT by Colt_SBR]


Link Posted: 9/14/2005 11:01:25 AM EDT
Right now, ONSTAR is analog cellular, but will be switched to CDMA in the next few years. What happens when you live in a non-coverage area?
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 11:25:51 AM EDT
Whatever.

I HIGHLY DOUBT it can tell you when a radiator needs replacing or a u-joint is going bad, etc etc.

The whole friggen car would be wires.

It's only going to report the standard OBDII enhanced crap.

Big deal.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 12:35:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:

Originally Posted By oneshot1kill:
That's a waste of time and technology. If some people are already ignoring a Check Engine Light, what makes you think an email is going to help. These people will ignore that as well. I think it's just another marketing strategy to draw new customers and then get them into the shop for repair$, GM is already in trouble as a company.



It is in the interest of GM to do all they can to ensure that customers service the vehicles regularly and deal with problems in their infancy, rather than run up huge problems and then irrationally blame GM for those problems, as MANY do.




A new vehicle should not require any service except oil changes, tire rotations, and brake inspection repair for at least the first 100,000 miles.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 12:41:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By HardShell:

Originally Posted By Leisure_Shoot:
It is only a matter of time before they start tracking oil changes, etc... and using that to calculate your resale value when you go to buy a new car.



Good news for those of us who properly maintain our vehicles, eh?



what about those of use who change our own?
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 12:43:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Garand_Shooter:
The Army is spending a good deal of money to develop these systems as well, to reduce downtime. Imagine rolling back in from a mission and the mechanics already have your parts wating to be installed.



Yeah, first you have to be able to imagine that they were able to buy and get those parts beforehand.

In reality you'll just know sooner which parts you don't have are holding up repairing your equipment.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 12:45:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:

Originally Posted By swingset:
As if I needed another reason to never buy a General Motors turd vehicle.

There's no big brother BS on my vehicles, never will be.



So you don't intend to buy any vehicle made after 2000?



My 2002 Nissan sentra had a working black box.

It doesn't any longer. I could have chosen a vehicle that was difficult if not impossible to render it inoperable, but I did my homework.

Hacker forums are your friend.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 12:48:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Leisure_Shoot:
what about those of use who change our own?



SOL, I guess. (I haven't in years...)
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 12:59:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/14/2005 1:00:43 PM EDT by John_Wayne777]

Originally Posted By AR15fan:
A new vehicle should not require any service except oil changes, tire rotations, and brake inspection repair for at least the first 100,000 miles.



No it should not.

But occasionally sensors short, etc....

If that happens it is better to have the problem taken care of sooner than later.

Also, care to guess how many people rotate their tires as they should?? E-mail alerts are not necessary for some. For others they may help to stop them from ruining a perfectly good vehicle. The auto makers should include an option where folks who are concerned about such things can turn the features off.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 1:02:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:
My 2002 Nissan sentra had a working black box.

It doesn't any longer. I could have chosen a vehicle that was difficult if not impossible to render it inoperable, but I did my homework.

Hacker forums are your friend.



You are obviously a criminal.

I bet you pull the tags off your matresses too.......

Deviant scum.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 1:03:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By John_Wayne777:

Originally Posted By AR15fan:
A new vehicle should not require any service except oil changes, tire rotations, and brake inspection repair for at least the first 100,000 miles.



No it should not.

But occasionally sensors short, etc....

If that happens it is better to have the problem taken care of sooner than later.



Try telling them that when you need warranty service on something that "requires scheduled maintenance". That is the new con by the automakers to get out of warranty repairs.

"My automatic transmission ate itself at 22,000 miles. I check the fluid every month and certainly at every oil change."

"Well, sir, did you get it in for the 15,000 mile transmission service, including flush and filter replacement?"

"No, I did not."

"It is your responsibility to keep up with those scheduled maintenance items otherwise the warranty is not going to cover repairs."

Been there, done that.
Link Posted: 9/14/2005 2:03:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ArmedAggie:
... "It is your responsibility to keep up with those scheduled maintenance items otherwise the warranty is not going to cover repairs."...



All warranties have terms and limitations. IMHO it is incumbent upon the buyer to learn about those before the purchase, not dispute them after a problem comes up - but YMMV.

While my vehicles are under factory warranty, I follow their service schedule as much as is required not to void the full warranty coverage. After they are out of warranty (I tend to keep cars forever, or at least as long as they are reliable ), then I service as I see fit. Again, YMMV.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 5:14:00 AM EDT
One thing to keep in mind, -and no offense to the dealer techs out there, I was one for years- is that you can have your vehicle serviced and maintained at any certified repair shop, the dealers don't like this but they can't force you to use thier techs to do any work. They are losing customers to the independent shops, and I think this is an attempt for them to get back some customers. Almost all of our customers who buy new cars bring them to us for everything, including some warranty work, even though they have to pay for that.

Timely service, quality work, and customer appreciation are not always available at the dealership today.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 8:37:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By oneshot1kill:
One thing to keep in mind, -and no offense to the dealer techs out there, I was one for years- is that you can have your vehicle serviced and maintained at any certified repair shop, the dealers don't like this but they can't force you to use thier techs to do any work. They are losing customers to the independent shops, and I think this is an attempt for them to get back some customers. Almost all of our customers who buy new cars bring them to us for everything, including some warranty work, even though they have to pay for that.

Timely service, quality work, and customer appreciation are not always never available at the stealership today.



My family was in the car biz for years, and I knew alot of wrenches. I haven't seen, in my 35 years, a dealership service department that wasn't crooked. Some worse than others, but honesty and dealership is like saying rational democrat.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 8:43:00 AM EDT
you people do remember that onstar was used against us during 9/11 right?

remember when they were locking peoples doors so they could not start they're cars or get to them. I think some were disabled from starting but I don't remember correctly.

Oh and the illegaly recorded conversations that they found out they have been doing with onstar?

it's not myths, these things have already been done.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 8:55:39 AM EDT
Who needs Onstar? Every time I go to my quick lube he tells me I need to replace 57 items and service the rest.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 9:15:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Luxan:
you people do remember that onstar was used against us during 9/11 right?

remember when they were locking peoples doors so they could not start they're cars or get to them. I think some were disabled from starting but I don't remember correctly.

Oh and the illegaly recorded conversations that they found out they have been doing with onstar?

it's not myths, these things have already been done.



Actually I don't remember anything about them being used against us on 9/11. Care to provide a link.
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