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6/25/2018 7:04:05 PM
Posted: 6/21/2018 1:38:48 AM EDT
I have an old Nikon DSLR with a few lenses but wanted something smaller and more straight forward for EDC. after reading reviews and info on the Fuji x line I purchased a refurb x100S. I should get it in the mail soon but I am really excited to start using this camera.

Anybody on here have any experience with them? Thoughts? Tips?

Thanks.
Link Posted: 6/21/2018 2:10:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/21/2018 2:48:23 AM EDT by JAFFE]
Originally Posted By Smithy:
I have an old Nikon DSLR with a few lenses but wanted something smaller and more straight forward for EDC. after reading reviews and info on the Fuji x line I purchased a refurb x100S. I should get it in the mail soon but I am really excited to start using this camera.

Anybody on here have any experience with them? Thoughts? Tips?

Thanks.
View Quote
Had the original years ago. Picked up the F last year.

Different experience than shooting DSLRs, expect a learning curve. My F is the one camera I toss in a vehicle to have a camera with me if I'm just tooling around.

AF is different, sometimes can be slow and frustrating if you compare it to a DSLR. The viewfinder can take some getting used to, but gives you options WRT the way you can use it. The 23/2 lens can be a bit soft wide open and at close distances - gets better further away/ with smaller apertures. The built-in ND filter is a bonus but easy to forget it's there. The leaf shutter makes the camera very quiet if you turn the sounds OFF. Depending on how you shoot, once you have the menu-controlled items set or assigned to a function, you can pretty much avoid menu dives.

May add some more after I think about this a bit.

Hoods - there are multiple third-party options in addition to the Fuji vented hood. Another option if you want a Fuji hood is the one from the X70 - it is compatible with the X100 series as well.

Batteries - mirrorless tend to eat through batteries faster than DSLRs, so you might think about having a spare or two on you when you go out.
Link Posted: 6/24/2018 11:16:20 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JAFFE:
Had the original years ago. Picked up the F last year.

Different experience than shooting DSLRs, expect a learning curve. My F is the one camera I toss in a vehicle to have a camera with me if I'm just tooling around.

AF is different, sometimes can be slow and frustrating if you compare it to a DSLR. The viewfinder can take some getting used to, but gives you options WRT the way you can use it. The 23/2 lens can be a bit soft wide open and at close distances - gets better further away/ with smaller apertures. The built-in ND filter is a bonus but easy to forget it's there. The leaf shutter makes the camera very quiet if you turn the sounds OFF. Depending on how you shoot, once you have the menu-controlled items set or assigned to a function, you can pretty much avoid menu dives.

May add some more after I think about this a bit.

Hoods - there are multiple third-party options in addition to the Fuji vented hood. Another option if you want a Fuji hood is the one from the X70 - it is compatible with the X100 series as well.

Batteries - mirrorless tend to eat through batteries faster than DSLRs, so you might think about having a spare or two on you when you go out.
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JAFFE:
Originally Posted By Smithy:
I have an old Nikon DSLR with a few lenses but wanted something smaller and more straight forward for EDC. after reading reviews and info on the Fuji x line I purchased a refurb x100S. I should get it in the mail soon but I am really excited to start using this camera.

Anybody on here have any experience with them? Thoughts? Tips?

Thanks.
Had the original years ago. Picked up the F last year.

Different experience than shooting DSLRs, expect a learning curve. My F is the one camera I toss in a vehicle to have a camera with me if I'm just tooling around.

AF is different, sometimes can be slow and frustrating if you compare it to a DSLR. The viewfinder can take some getting used to, but gives you options WRT the way you can use it. The 23/2 lens can be a bit soft wide open and at close distances - gets better further away/ with smaller apertures. The built-in ND filter is a bonus but easy to forget it's there. The leaf shutter makes the camera very quiet if you turn the sounds OFF. Depending on how you shoot, once you have the menu-controlled items set or assigned to a function, you can pretty much avoid menu dives.

May add some more after I think about this a bit.

Hoods - there are multiple third-party options in addition to the Fuji vented hood. Another option if you want a Fuji hood is the one from the X70 - it is compatible with the X100 series as well.

Batteries - mirrorless tend to eat through batteries faster than DSLRs, so you might think about having a spare or two on you when you go out.
Thanks for the reply!

I need to add a few batteries. I will eventually get a hood but for now I think I will keep a uv filter on it for protection.

I hope to post up some pics once I get it.
Link Posted: 6/24/2018 11:32:30 AM EDT
It's a handy, fun camera. Enjoy!

Oh - on processing Fuji RAW files. Over-sharpening can cause issues. Sometimes called watercolor or painterly effect, or "worms". Foliage is one area it can show up quickly.

For me, with Fuji I shoot jpeg + RAW. I process the RAW if I want a different look than the jpeg simulation I had selected, or if I need to make corrections to the image. I have found with Fuji, I tend to do less processing of RAWs, and when I do it's normally because of something like wanting ACROS instead of Classic Chrome or Velvia. Mostly crop and resize jpegs these days.

I've been using Fuji RAW File Converter EX v2, and X RAW Studio. Both have clunky interfaces compared to other programs like Adobe, DXO, Affinity, etc... But, they give you the option of using Fuji's in-camera film sim profiles, not a third party's interpretation of Fuji's in-camera film sim profiles. You won't be able to use the X RAW Studio, it only works with the latest camera processors (X100F, X-Pro2, X-T2, X-H1, X-T20, and GFX-50S). RFC2 is free if you want to try it. http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/software/myfinepix_studio/rfc_2/win/

I still shoot just RAW on my Pentax, and adjust to taste.
Link Posted: 6/25/2018 2:32:32 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By JAFFE:
It's a handy, fun camera. Enjoy!

Oh - on processing Fuji RAW files. Over-sharpening can cause issues. Sometimes called watercolor or painterly effect, or "worms". Foliage is one area it can show up quickly.

For me, with Fuji I shoot jpeg + RAW. I process the RAW if I want a different look than the jpeg simulation I had selected, or if I need to make corrections to the image. I have found with Fuji, I tend to do less processing of RAWs, and when I do it's normally because of something like wanting ACROS instead of Classic Chrome or Velvia. Mostly crop and resize jpegs these days.

I've been using Fuji RAW File Converter EX v2, and X RAW Studio. Both have clunky interfaces compared to other programs like Adobe, DXO, Affinity, etc... But, they give you the option of using Fuji's in-camera film sim profiles, not a third party's interpretation of Fuji's in-camera film sim profiles. You won't be able to use the X RAW Studio, it only works with the latest camera processors (X100F, X-Pro2, X-T2, X-H1, X-T20, and GFX-50S). RFC2 is free if you want to try it. http://www.fujifilm.com/support/digital_cameras/software/myfinepix_studio/rfc_2/win/

I still shoot just RAW on my Pentax, and adjust to taste.
View Quote
Yeah, I have been reading about the RAW conversion issues. I read that the newer versions of light room has fixed a lot of those issues and they also support the x100 series stuff now. I use light room and don't want to change over to capture one or something else if I don't have to. I also read the jpeg quality is amazing and a lot of people have been using the jpegs straight out of the camera with minimal post processing. Thanks.
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