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Posted: 6/30/2015 10:35:12 AM EDT


Hey fellas, I've replaced the clutch in lots of  older trucks
with both two and four wheel drive and never had any problems.  The
installs have all been pretty easy.  Im considering trying to put one in
a 99 corolla now though.  Ive never done a front wheel drive clutch
before and am basically looking for some advice. I'll be doing it in my
garage with jack stands and a creeper by myself.  Ive got a hoist
mounted in the ceiling too.




Other than the extra parts dissassembly, is this any more difficult than any other clutch job?





Is
this something most guys would just pay someone to do?  I'm the kind of
guy who will normally bite of more than I can chew before I'll pay
somebody to do something for me.




How much would a garage charge for a clutch (with flywheel) replacement in your area?  



Thanks!

Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:39:43 AM EDT
[#1]
Nah, not really any harder if you arent counting the extra shit you gotta unbolt.
Shop would probably be north of 1k with parts and labor.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:52:09 AM EDT
[#2]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Nah, not really any harder if you arent counting the extra shit you gotta unbolt.

Shop would probably be north of 1k with parts and labor.
View Quote
Yikes, looks like I've got a project then.

 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:55:16 AM EDT
[#3]
Well look at it this way, all you have to do when a car company puts an engine in the right way sending power to the correct wheels, is pretty much unbolt the bell housing and drop the transmission. When they install an engine sideways sending power to the wrong wheels, you get to unbolt everything! And I mean everything.

The whole power unit is installed as one piece in the factory on the front subframe. They just put it on a big jack, lift it, and bolt the subframe into the car body, and then hook up the rest of the wires and hoses later. That ought to give you an idea.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:56:44 AM EDT
[#4]
I did the clutch replacement on my SRT4 in my driveway before I sold it, wasn't too bad compared to dropping the trans on a RWD/4x4.

Pretty straight forward, the biggest difference between RWD/4x4 is you'll need to pull both CV half shafts before you can drop the transmission. Once those are out, it's a matter of disconnecting the clutch fluid line and/or clutch pedal, removing any of the ancillary shit that might be in the way and unbolting the trans. You'll likely need a way to support the engine (such as your hoist) once the trans is out.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:57:04 AM EDT
[#5]
It'll be easy, and oem exedy clutch is cheap. My Hondas were super simple compared to my awd cars with a heavy transfer case in the way.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 10:57:49 AM EDT
[#6]
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 11:05:58 AM EDT
[#7]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I'd take a beating with a 2x4 before flat backing a clutch in a front wheel drive car in my garage or driveway. YMMV of course.



The transmission and cradle usually act as a load bearer member, so you'll have to support the engine while everything is apart. There's rigs that go across the shock towers specifically for this, or I guess in a pinch you could use jack stands and blocks of wood as necessary.





I don't suppose it'd be very hard, just kinda tedious.

View Quote
I planned on using my floor jack to support and raise the engine while the trans was out and to help with alignment when reinstalling.



 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 11:08:05 AM EDT
[#8]
Also, I should add.  This is just my beater car.  I have a 2013 Tacoma that keep in the garage as my "nice" vehicle.  If I get the corolla to fucky I'll just push it in the river and throw the title away.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 11:48:10 AM EDT
[#9]
Check Youtube to see if anyone has good videos on the subject.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 11:52:36 AM EDT
[#10]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I planned on using my floor jack to support and raise the engine while the trans was out and to help with alignment when reinstalling.
 
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
I'd take a beating with a 2x4 before flat backing a clutch in a front wheel drive car in my garage or driveway. YMMV of course.

The transmission and cradle usually act as a load bearer member, so you'll have to support the engine while everything is apart. There's rigs that go across the shock towers specifically for this, or I guess in a pinch you could use jack stands and blocks of wood as necessary.


I don't suppose it'd be very hard, just kinda tedious.
I planned on using my floor jack to support and raise the engine while the trans was out and to help with alignment when reinstalling.
 


Considering the only thing on the bottom of the engine is the oil pan, that's a bad idea. Get an engine lift or the shock tower rig.

Or just take it to a garage and masturbate furiously to the shop tech's misfortune.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 11:53:08 AM EDT
[#11]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Check Youtube to see if anyone has good videos on the subject.

View Quote
Yeah, Im going to spend the rest of the day at "work" researching the topic.



 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 11:58:31 AM EDT
[#12]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Considering the only thing on the bottom of the engine is the oil pan, that's a bad idea. Get an engine lift or the shock tower rig.





Or just take it to a garage and masturbate furiously to the shop tech's misfortune.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:





Quoted:




Quoted:


I'd take a beating with a 2x4 before flat backing a clutch in a front wheel drive car in my garage or driveway. YMMV of course.





The transmission and cradle usually act as a load bearer member, so you'll have to support the engine while everything is apart. There's rigs that go across the shock towers specifically for this, or I guess in a pinch you could use jack stands and blocks of wood as necessary.
I don't suppose it'd be very hard, just kinda tedious.


I planned on using my floor jack to support and raise the engine while the trans was out and to help with alignment when reinstalling.


 






Considering the only thing on the bottom of the engine is the oil pan, that's a bad idea. Get an engine lift or the shock tower rig.





Or just take it to a garage and masturbate furiously to the shop tech's misfortune.






The last time I used the floor jack to drop a transmission I made a big flat plate out of steel so I wouldnt dent the pan.  I think I can adapt that to the bottom of this engine.  If not, I"ll have to use some blocks of wood to protect it.  If I use the hoist to support the engine I wont be able to use it to lift the trans up and out of the bay or for reinstalling and alignment.



I may look into one of those shock tower rigs though.  Maybe they arent too expensive.
 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 12:02:02 PM EDT
[#13]
You'll be fine.

It's the same as RWD only a few more parts to remove before pulling the transmission.




Link Posted: 6/30/2015 12:12:13 PM EDT
[#14]
It's not that bad. FWD isn't assembled with Voodoo.









Just make sure you have all the tools you need ahead of time, and if possible find a FSM or Chiltons at the very least.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 12:20:20 PM EDT
[#15]
Toyota Corrolla should be pretty easy, lots of room to work around for being a small car. The most difficult part may be pulling the axles, depending on how the ball joints are set up. My Neon used a pinch bolt for the ball joints, so separating them was easy. The GTI I didn't have to even separate the joint, as the ball joint itself was easily unbolted from the control arm, allowing me plenty of clearance to swing shit out of the way to pull the axle.

You don't really need the engine support, though its good to have. If you have a second jack and some wood blocks, you can just use that to support the engine. If you really wanted one for cheap, I think Harbor Freight sells one, and you might be able to rent one from an Autozone.

Parts should be cheap as fuck, too.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 12:22:53 PM EDT
[#16]
Harbor Freight also sells a tie rod separator that works wonders on ball joints. No hammering, no pickle forks, no damaged parts. Mine was less than $20, and one of the best things I've ever bought there.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 12:29:23 PM EDT
[#17]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Harbor Freight also sells a tie rod separator that works wonders on ball joints. No hammering, no pickle forks, no damaged parts. Mine was less than $20, and one of the best things I've ever bought there.
View Quote


My boss just broke one of those trying to separate a tie rod end from a spindle on his 200k mile BMW 5 series wagon.

He needed new spindle because he had to replace the lower control arms/ball joints, and none of them came out of the taper, they just pulled the bushing out of the aluminum spindle.

ETA: Of course, depending on the mileage and/or ease of removal, replacing those ball joints may not be a bad idea, especially if they don't require a press to be removed from the lower control arm.

ETA2: Co worker has a late '90's Corolla, I may just go out and take a peek at it.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 12:47:14 PM EDT
[#18]
I did the clutch in a 2001 Hyundai Elantra late last fall.  Bullshit rust pile of a car worth $600, probably would have paid more than that to have a shop do the work.
Clutch and flywheel assy was $200 or so, I did the master and slave cylinder at the same time and put in a new rear main seal.  Car had 250k miles on it, original clutch.



Was not hard.  Maybe even easier to remove than the 4L60E in the Caprice I had.
All I have is a little 3 ton jack, and a couple sets of jackstands and hand tools.

I dropped the front corner of the subframe to be able to get the trans fully removed from the car.
Youtube had some videos of the guys just sticking the tail of the trans over twoards the wheel well.  I wanted to do the rear seal which required more space.
Required some fooling around with removing the bumper as a captive nut that a subframe bolt screwed into was just spinning.
Still not too much of a pita.


Funny thing is that I swore when the clutch went I was not going to do it and just junk the car.  And it had been slipping infrequently for a year and a half.  Well my son wound up in the NICU for two weeks after he was born and we had unknown medical bills.  Not near as much as we thought it was going to be, but at the time fear of the unknown amount stopped me from getting a loan for a full size van.




Get on youtube and find a few videos of the process to make sure you want to tackle it.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:00:21 PM EDT
[#19]
I haven't replaced one on a corolla but if it is remotely like a civic you should be done in 3 or 4 hours. There are probably videos on YouTube showing you how to do it.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:06:41 PM EDT
[#20]
Able to change the clutch on a dodge neon in about 2 hours using jack stands/jack.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:11:43 PM EDT
[#21]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
My boss just broke one of those trying to separate a tie rod end from a spindle on his 200k mile BMW 5 series wagon.



He needed new spindle because he had to replace the lower control arms/ball joints, and none of them came out of the taper, they just pulled the bushing out of the aluminum spindle.



ETA: Of course, depending on the mileage and/or ease of removal, replacing those ball joints may not be a bad idea, especially if they don't require a press to be removed from the lower control arm.



ETA2: Co worker has a late '90's Corolla, I may just go out and take a peek at it.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

Harbor Freight also sells a tie rod separator that works wonders on ball joints. No hammering, no pickle forks, no damaged parts. Mine was less than $20, and one of the best things I've ever bought there.




My boss just broke one of those trying to separate a tie rod end from a spindle on his 200k mile BMW 5 series wagon.



He needed new spindle because he had to replace the lower control arms/ball joints, and none of them came out of the taper, they just pulled the bushing out of the aluminum spindle.



ETA: Of course, depending on the mileage and/or ease of removal, replacing those ball joints may not be a bad idea, especially if they don't require a press to be removed from the lower control arm.



ETA2: Co worker has a late '90's Corolla, I may just go out and take a peek at it.
I don't think we're talking about the same tool.

 





Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:11:50 PM EDT
[#22]
I've done it twice. Takes me a weekend. Be sure to look up owners forums for advice on what to replace when it's open. For instance, rear main seal.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:18:43 PM EDT
[#23]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I've done it twice. Takes me a weekend. Be sure to look up owners forums for advice on what to replace when it's open. For instance, rear main seal.
View Quote
I'll check this out.  Might as well give the old man a little TLC while Im in there.
 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:21:55 PM EDT
[#24]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I don't think we're talking about the same tool.    



View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Quoted:
Harbor Freight also sells a tie rod separator that works wonders on ball joints. No hammering, no pickle forks, no damaged parts. Mine was less than $20, and one of the best things I've ever bought there.


My boss just broke one of those trying to separate a tie rod end from a spindle on his 200k mile BMW 5 series wagon.

He needed new spindle because he had to replace the lower control arms/ball joints, and none of them came out of the taper, they just pulled the bushing out of the aluminum spindle.

ETA: Of course, depending on the mileage and/or ease of removal, replacing those ball joints may not be a bad idea, especially if they don't require a press to be removed from the lower control arm.

ETA2: Co worker has a late '90's Corolla, I may just go out and take a peek at it.
I don't think we're talking about the same tool.    





I bet we are...



It was the tool on the far right. The part that presses on the end to push it through broke.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:23:55 PM EDT
[#25]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I did the clutch in a 2001 Hyundai Elantra late last fall.  Bullshit rust pile of a car worth $600, probably would have paid more than that to have a shop do the work.

Clutch and flywheel assy was $200 or so, I did the master and slave cylinder at the same time and put in a new rear main seal.  Car had 250k miles on it, original clutch.
Was not hard.  Maybe even easier to remove than the 4L60E in the Caprice I had.

All I have is a little 3 ton jack, and a couple sets of jackstands and hand tools.



I dropped the front corner of the subframe to be able to get the trans fully removed from the car.

Youtube had some videos of the guys just sticking the tail of the trans over twoards the wheel well.  I wanted to do the rear seal which required more space.

Required some fooling around with removing the bumper as a captive nut that a subframe bolt screwed into was just spinning.

Still not too much of a pita.





Funny thing is that I swore when the clutch went I was not going to do it and just junk the car.  And it had been slipping infrequently for a year and a half.  Well my son wound up in the NICU for two weeks after he was born and we had unknown medical bills.  Not near as much as we thought it was going to be, but at the time fear of the unknown amount stopped me from getting a loan for a full size van.
Get on youtube and find a few videos of the process to make sure you want to tackle it.
View Quote
Im in a similar place with this car.  I got it for 500 bucks when my buddy got transfered to Texas and I was just planning on running it until it died then junking it.  But now  its got 200K, Im the 3rd owner and I know the previous two.  It still gets nearly 40 mpg on the highway and its not too beat up either.  I just hate the Idea of letting the old man go over a clutch.
 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:25:01 PM EDT
[#26]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Able to change the clutch on a dodge neon in about 2 hours using jack stands/jack.
View Quote


Yeah, that sounds about right...

Pro tip: If you still have a modular clutch in your Neon, get the PT Cruiser clutch. Its the same amount, but it has more holding power.

When the clutch went on my own 1G, I actually tore the splines out of the disk.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:25:34 PM EDT
[#27]
Not a hard job at all.
Corolla's are pretty easy to work on.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:26:49 PM EDT
[#28]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I bet we are...



http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_23622.jpg



It was the tool on the far right. The part that presses on the end to push it through broke.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:


Quoted:

Harbor Freight also sells a tie rod separator that works wonders on ball joints. No hammering, no pickle forks, no damaged parts. Mine was less than $20, and one of the best things I've ever bought there.




My boss just broke one of those trying to separate a tie rod end from a spindle on his 200k mile BMW 5 series wagon.



He needed new spindle because he had to replace the lower control arms/ball joints, and none of them came out of the taper, they just pulled the bushing out of the aluminum spindle.



ETA: Of course, depending on the mileage and/or ease of removal, replacing those ball joints may not be a bad idea, especially if they don't require a press to be removed from the lower control arm.



ETA2: Co worker has a late '90's Corolla, I may just go out and take a peek at it.
I don't think we're talking about the same tool.    











I bet we are...



http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_23622.jpg



It was the tool on the far right. The part that presses on the end to push it through broke.
Ahhh... thought you said the tool busted the ball joint. RIF.

 



Mine hasn't broken yet, guess I've been lucky.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:30:45 PM EDT
[#29]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I bet we are...



http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_23622.jpg



It was the tool on the far right. The part that presses on the end to push it through broke.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:


Quoted:

Harbor Freight also sells a tie rod separator that works wonders on ball joints. No hammering, no pickle forks, no damaged parts. Mine was less than $20, and one of the best things I've ever bought there.




My boss just broke one of those trying to separate a tie rod end from a spindle on his 200k mile BMW 5 series wagon.



He needed new spindle because he had to replace the lower control arms/ball joints, and none of them came out of the taper, they just pulled the bushing out of the aluminum spindle.



ETA: Of course, depending on the mileage and/or ease of removal, replacing those ball joints may not be a bad idea, especially if they don't require a press to be removed from the lower control arm.



ETA2: Co worker has a late '90's Corolla, I may just go out and take a peek at it.
I don't think we're talking about the same tool.    











I bet we are...



http://www.harborfreight.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/m/image_23622.jpg



It was the tool on the far right. The part that presses on the end to push it through broke.
Ive got that kit, also the whole ball joint kit too that comes with all the collars and spacers.    I'll get this bitch apart.  Hell, I can always get them apart......



 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:39:22 PM EDT
[#30]
Its one thing I wont do. I do all my own work from exhaust to bodywork. Have a Hyundai needed a clutch and took it to my buddys shop. $150 out and $150 in. I bought the parts around $200. He even said it was a royal bitch.
I have torches welders etc and do engine swaps, frame work but not going in cold turkey on a project like that.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 1:42:46 PM EDT
[#31]
Every FWD is different, when talking about clutch replacement.



Anywhere from dropping entire engine/trans assy out the bottom, to just remove pressure plate ala Saab 900.



Get a Chiltons, or look online for Specific info to your make/model.



Anywhere from real easy to PITA.



YMMV


Link Posted: 6/30/2015 3:23:05 PM EDT
[#32]
Most FWD cars are pretty easy, but some special tools or equipment might be required since pulling an axle and motor mount is often required.  When I worked for Honda/Acura I could replace a clutch in less than an hour in most of them.  Good money since it usually paid 3-5 hours.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 3:25:24 PM EDT
[#33]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Check Youtube to see if anyone has good videos on the subject.
View Quote


This is the first thing I do every time I wade into unfamiliar territory.

Good luck OP.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 3:31:48 PM EDT
[#34]
You may find a shop to do it for pretty reasonable. My dad and I are both very mechanically adept but when his Escort needed a clutch, $250 for labor at a local shop was well worth it. For that money, FWD bullshit can kiss my ass.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 3:31:59 PM EDT
[#35]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
This is the first thing I do every time I wade into unfamiliar territory.



Good luck OP.
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:

Check Youtube to see if anyone has good videos on the subject.





This is the first thing I do every time I wade into unfamiliar territory.



Good luck OP.
Thanks man.  



 
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 3:33:19 PM EDT
[#36]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
It'll be easy, and oem exedy clutch is cheap. My Hondas were super simple compared to my awd cars with a heavy transfer case in the way.
View Quote


I've only done 4 banger Honda's but I imagine a Toyota would be close to the same thing. Should be able to do it in a few hours in the driveway with the car on jack stands.
Link Posted: 6/30/2015 4:34:11 PM EDT
[#37]
FWD is easier 90% of the time when it comes to clutch jobs. Do it yourself and it'll cost maybe $100 if you're just doing the clutch alone. Add maybe $50 as a backup "oh shit" measure.

If you're mechanically inclined, but have never done a FWD before it'll likely take you a few hours. Then every one that you do after that will be cake.

I changed the clutch on a 2003 corolla and it's was pretty easy.
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