Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 2/17/2012 5:16:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 5:17:55 AM EDT by RDak]
I tied into a 20 amp (12 gauge) line then (1) split off and ran another line from it and installed a plug outlet and then (2) extended that out with another line to a switch.

I used 12 gauge wire on all the extensions but do I have to use an outlet rated for 20 amps or can I use a 15 amp rated plug outlet?

I will not be using anywhere near 15 amps on the new plug outlet. (At most I'll probably use 10 amps if that much.)

Thanks for any opinions.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:18:36 AM EDT
Code and safety wise a 20.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:24:58 AM EDT
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


Ok, I gotta go to the hardware store.

One more question if you don't mind.

It is all in the basement and I used metal boxes.

I grounded the boxes with a green grounding screw and twisted the grounding wires around the grounding wire coming in from the split off 12 gauge wire. Then used that one wire to tie to the outlet.

Is that a decent way of grounding the box and lines?
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:27:52 AM EDT
20 for 2 reasons. 1.You don't know who will plug what in when your not there. What if you sell the house? 2. What is the total load on the line? I think your saying it was existing and you tapped in to add a plug and a switched light. How many plugs and or lights are on there before that ?
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:31:27 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


Ok, I gotta go to the hardware store.

One more question if you don't mind.

It is all in the basement and I used metal boxes.

I grounded the boxes with a green grounding screw and twisted the grounding wires around the grounding wire coming in from the split off 12 gauge wire. Then used that one wire to tie to the outlet.

Is that a decent way of grounding the box and lines?


I would splice the gounding wire at the junction and use a wire nut, just like the hot and nuetral.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:32:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 5:34:01 AM EDT by Disintegr8or]
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


I'd be OK with using a 15 amp receptacle, especially not knowing how many existing receptacles/switches are on the existing circuit.
That would be a good way to keep somebody from plugging in a 20A appliance into an already taxed circuit.

Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:41:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 5:42:37 AM EDT by RDak]
Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


Ok, I gotta go to the hardware store.

One more question if you don't mind.

It is all in the basement and I used metal boxes.

I grounded the boxes with a green grounding screw and twisted the grounding wires around the grounding wire coming in from the split off 12 gauge wire. Then used that one wire to tie to the outlet.

Is that a decent way of grounding the box and lines?


I would splice the gounding wire at the junction and use a wire nut, just like the hot and nuetral.


I did that at the junction box when splitting the lines but in the new outlet and switch boxes I twisted the wires together and left the 12 gauge grounding wire a bit "longer" to hook up to the outlet and switch.

Not ok?

The reason I ask is 12 gauge is thick and having to put another wire in there and pigtailing to the outlet will take up alot of space. Might take up too much space IMHO, everything is pretty packed in already in those two new boxes.

Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:44:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


I'd be OK with using a 15 amp receptacle, especially not knowing how many existing receptacles/switches are on the existing circuit.
That would be a good way to keep somebody from plugging in a 20A appliance into an already taxed circuit.



I hear you but if code says I gotta have a 20 amp, I'll just go buy one.

I have 15 amp outlets on hand but no more 20's.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:50:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


Ok, I gotta go to the hardware store.

One more question if you don't mind.

It is all in the basement and I used metal boxes.

I grounded the boxes with a green grounding screw and twisted the grounding wires around the grounding wire coming in from the split off 12 gauge wire. Then used that one wire to tie to the outlet.

Is that a decent way of grounding the box and lines?


I would splice the gounding wire at the junction and use a wire nut, just like the hot and nuetral.


I did that at the junction box when splitting the lines but in the new outlet and switch boxes I twisted the wires together and left the 12 gauge grounding wire a bit "longer" to hook up to the outlet and switch.

Not ok?

The reason I ask is 12 gauge is thick and having to put another wire in there and pigtailing to the outlet will take up alot of space. Might take up too much space IMHO, everything is pretty packed in already in those two new boxes.



OK I think your saying you twisted nuetral and hot at the plug with a pigtail going to the plug.The ground was wrapped around the green screw with no pigtail. You could have went in one side of the plug and out the other to the swith. No pig tails needed. Should work fine though
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:51:36 AM EDT
Did you use boxes to meet your "box fill" requirements? If you did, you shouldn't have any problem tying the grounds together and then running a pigtail to the receptacle and use a wire nut to hold it all together.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:53:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 6:00:11 AM EDT by Disintegr8or]
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


I'd be OK with using a 15 amp receptacle, especially not knowing how many existing receptacles/switches are on the existing circuit.
That would be a good way to keep somebody from plugging in a 20A appliance into an already taxed circuit.



I hear you but if code says I gotta have a 20 amp, I'll just go buy one.

I have 15 amp outlets on hand but no more 20's.


Read the code, it doesn't say that.

It's not against code if you have more than one receptacle on the circuit and you treat the circuit as a 15A circuit, not 20A.
Once again, I'd use a 15 to prevent overload if you are adding a light now as well.

Edit: are the existing receptacles on that circuit 20a? If so stay with 20a then.


Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:55:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 5:57:06 AM EDT by PKT1106]
I am currently in the middle of rewiring my house from the old ungrounded knob & tube type system. I am using 20A breakers with 12/2 cable and 15A outlets. This meets NEC code and my local codes. You will have to check to see if your local inspector will accept it, if you have to submit to an inspector. Some rural areas don't have inspectors, so you just have to do it per NEC. The only thing is you can't cut into a wire to splice, you have to do it with an outlet or in a separate junction box with wirenuts.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 5:56:17 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Dublin1997:
Did you use boxes to meet your "box fill" requirements? If you did, you shouldn't have any problem tying the grounds together and then running a pigtail to the receptacle and use a wire nut to hold it all together.


No, I think I'll have to buy a new outlet box but the switch box should be fine.

I'll just buy another box.

Thanks for all the help guys.

I made a mistake when buying the boxes and not remembering this is all 12 gauge wire.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 6:07:44 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 6:12:19 AM EDT by RDak]
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


I'd be OK with using a 15 amp receptacle, especially not knowing how many existing receptacles/switches are on the existing circuit.
That would be a good way to keep somebody from plugging in a 20A appliance into an already taxed circuit.



I hear you but if code says I gotta have a 20 amp, I'll just go buy one.

I have 15 amp outlets on hand but no more 20's.


Read the code, it doesn't say that.

It's not against code if you have more than one receptacle on the circuit and you treat the circuit as a 15A circuit, not 20A.
Once again, I'd use a 15 to prevent overload if you are adding a light now as well.



Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Down the line I have a 20 amp outlet, it runs a small freezer that takes about 3 amps.

When I put that line in about 25 years ago, I used a 20 amp outlet. (I just went and looked to make sure and it is 20 amp.)

Does that change things?

Link Posted: 2/17/2012 6:15:26 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/17/2012 6:16:10 AM EDT by RDak]
Originally Posted By PKT1106:
I am currently in the middle of rewiring my house from the old ungrounded knob & tube type system. I am using 20A breakers with 12/2 cable and 15A outlets. This meets NEC code and my local codes. You will have to check to see if your local inspector will accept it, if you have to submit to an inspector. Some rural areas don't have inspectors, so you just have to do it per NEC. The only thing is you can't cut into a wire to splice, you have to do it with an outlet or in a separate junction box with wirenuts.


Thanks.

I did have to use a junction box for the splice and wire nutted everything together in that box.

The circuit and new lines all work ok, I'm mainly concerned about putting the 15amp outlet in a 20 amp line where the other outlet is using a 20 amp outlet.

I'm not sure about this one.

I should have mentioned before that the other existing outlet has a 20 amp outlet in it.
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 6:17:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


I'd be OK with using a 15 amp receptacle, especially not knowing how many existing receptacles/switches are on the existing circuit.
That would be a good way to keep somebody from plugging in a 20A appliance into an already taxed circuit.



I hear you but if code says I gotta have a 20 amp, I'll just go buy one.

I have 15 amp outlets on hand but no more 20's.


Read the code, it doesn't say that.

It's not against code if you have more than one receptacle on the circuit and you treat the circuit as a 15A circuit, not 20A.
Once again, I'd use a 15 to prevent overload if you are adding a light now as well.

Edit: are the existing receptacles on that circuit 20a? If so stay with 20a then.
Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Thank you.

That is a major point I forgot to make.

Thanks again!!
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 6:30:44 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ARMALITE-FAN:

OK I think your saying you twisted nuetral and hot at the plug with a pigtail going to the plug.The ground was wrapped around the green screw with no pigtail. You could have went in one side of the plug and out the other to the swith. No pig tails needed. Should work fine though


Thanks!!
Link Posted: 2/17/2012 6:45:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By RDak:
Originally Posted By Disintegr8or:
Originally Posted By N8088HD:
Code and safety wise a 20.


I'd be OK with using a 15 amp receptacle, especially not knowing how many existing receptacles/switches are on the existing circuit.
That would be a good way to keep somebody from plugging in a 20A appliance into an already taxed circuit.



I hear you but if code says I gotta have a 20 amp, I'll just go buy one.

I have 15 amp outlets on hand but no more 20's.



Read the code, it doesn't say that.

It's not against code if you have more than one receptacle on the circuit and you treat the circuit as a 15A circuit, not 20A.
Once again, I'd use a 15 to prevent overload if you are adding a light now as well.

Edit: are the existing receptacles on that circuit 20a? If so stay with 20a then.
Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


Thank you.

That is a major point I forgot to make.

Thanks again!!


Percfect. Sounds like you have it together up there.

Link Posted: 2/17/2012 7:17:30 AM EDT
Thanks everyone, I think I got it now.

Never fully realized you can treat a 12 gauge as a 15 amp line if you just install 15 amp outlets.

Learn something everyday.

Thanks again.
Top Top