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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/2/2005 7:27:00 PM EDT
This is it! Pretty darn sharp and only 3000 hours.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:31:03 PM EDT
awesome find! Does it come with the bells and whistles of GPS [or what ever the acroymn is?]

Patty
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:34:03 PM EDT
No GPS. But, I got two extra concaves, extra chaffer and sieves, extra rotary deflector, hydraulic chaff spreader, straw chopper and straw spreader. This gives us two 9500's now, so we can finally retire the old 7700.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:36:37 PM EDT
smart move, I could never understand the need for the GPS but have to admit they're pretty cool. Even in my dumbest blond mode I can pay attention to where I'm going while listening to Rush!

Patty
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:38:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
smart move, I could never understand the need for the GPS but have to admit they're pretty cool. Even in my dumbest blond mode I can pay attention to where I'm going while listening to Rush!

Patty



My thinking exactly! Less to go wrong too!
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:44:13 PM EDT
Is that a lawnmower? :)

--Mike
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:44:48 PM EDT
These are made by Colt.

Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:46:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
These are made by Colt.

www.mortier-agri.be/fotos/6920werk.jpg




Them things sure have come a long way.


<------------still uses a 1932 Ford.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:49:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mcaswell:
Is that a lawnmower? :)

--Mike



That there be a Combine
To harvest crops. In this case, turf type grasses grown for seed and some vegetable crops grown for seed.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 7:50:53 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
These are made by Colt.

www.mortier-agri.be/fotos/6920werk.jpg



I wouldn't mind that third one I think it is a 7800. Hard to tell in the picture.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:00:48 PM EDT
I think my cousin utilizes an older 7700. He says with the price of new machines (or used new ones) he will never be able to upgrade. farming around 1200 acres is a 'little guy' operation in his neck of the woods, most farmers in his area are working 5-6k+ to turn any kind of significant profit.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:10:57 PM EDT
Time to take that 7700 to the combine demolition derby!!





Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:15:40 PM EDT
Take 'em to Bowling Green, OH for the National Tractor Pull!!!

Then have a beer at Ziggy's, or Brewster's or any of the fine establishments in town. I miss BG...
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:20:26 PM EDT
^That SHIT looks like a real good way to get dead...!
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:26:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dieselman:
This is it! Pretty darn sharp and only 3000 hours.
www.hunt101.com/img/330227.JPG



I'll catch shit for this but...

Only 3000 hrs??? The life of a combine is 4000.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:40:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Time to take that 7700 to the combine demolition derby!!

www.lindwa.com/2005%20Action%20Images/The%20Bee2.gif

www.lindwa.com/2005%20Action%20Images/Spirit%20of%20America.gif

www.lindwa.com/2005%20Action%20Images/Frankenbine2.gif




That may be the coolest thing I have EVER seen !!

Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:45:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2005 8:47:03 PM EDT by Dieselman]

Originally Posted By WaMag:

Originally Posted By Dieselman:
This is it! Pretty darn sharp and only 3000 hours.
www.hunt101.com/img/330227.JPG



I'll catch shit for this but...

Only 3000 hrs??? The life of a combine is 4000.



You are very right when talking about the average grain combine. Wheat, corn, soybeans are very hard on these machines. But, grass seed is belief it or not very easy on them and they last twice as long.
I would say a wheat machine is going to be worn out at 3500 to 4000 hours. Grass seed machine 6000 hours or more with some good maintanence. We actually have two 7700's. They both have about 4500 hours on them. One has been in grass seed all it's life and is still very good. The other was a grain combine for about 3000 hours of it's life and it is shot!

The grass seed machine shows virtually no wear.
The wheat machine has been patched with sheet metal on the lower feeder house pan, platform pan, tailings elevator, clean grain elevator, and in the shoe.
It's amazing the difference.


ETA - The 3000 some odd hours is engine hours. Seperator hours is 2300
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:49:42 PM EDT
Man, I havent seen any John Deere green since moving west.





Time to learn more on combines- Fact from above- 4500 hours they are shot with corn and beans.

How many hours would an average family small farm run one in a season???



Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:51:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2005 9:05:12 PM EDT by Dieselman]

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Time to take that 7700 to the combine demolition derby!!



Or just run them over with an old D8 Caterpillar, like I have done in the past!

This was the fate of my old JD 45 and JD 105

Link Posted: 10/2/2005 8:54:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2005 8:55:48 PM EDT by Dieselman]

Originally Posted By CavVet:
Man, I havent seen any John Deere green since moving west.





Time to learn more on combines- Fact from above- 4500 hours they are shot with corn and beans.

How many hours would an average family small farm run one in a season???






Well, we put about 200 hours a season on each of our two main combines. And about 50 hours on our oldest 7700.

But we only farm about 700-800 acres.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:04:56 PM EDT
We have three 6620 that we use for about 200 hrs a year, for about 1300 acres and another 4000 acres that we use custom harvest guys come in. Our combines are in the 2400-2800 hrs range. Was big into alfalfa seed in the 70's and 80's, now we're big into hay so we dont use combines as much. Didn't know that about grass seed. Try some dry peas and garbonzo beans, almost like buck shot, the combine with 2800hrs is in for a major overhaul.

Have a sister in law who has a friend that works in the combine design side at Deere and always tell him they need to add more chrome. BTW the 50 series is shit because of that. $300,000 combines with 250 hrs on them going in for $30-40,000 in repairs to fix worn out throats, and straw choppers. From what I can tell our wheat straw is more course then back east.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:11:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2005 9:12:27 PM EDT by PromptCritical]

Originally Posted By Dieselman:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Time to take that 7700 to the combine demolition derby!!



Or just run them over with an old D8 Caterpillar, like I have done in the past!

This was the fate of my old JD 45 and JD 105
www.hunt101.com/img/330247.JPG
www.hunt101.com/img/330249.JPG



I hear the flatten hippy protesters pretty good too.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:12:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WaMag:
We have three 6620 that we use for about 200 hrs a year, for about 1300 acres and another 4000 acres that we use custom harvest guys come in. Our combines are in the 2400-2800 hrs range. Was big into alfalfa seed in the 70's and 80's, now we're big into hay so we dont use combines as much. Didn't know that about grass seed. Try some dry peas and garbonzo beans, almost like buck shot, the combine with 2800hrs is in for a major overhaul.

Have a sister in law who has a friend that works in the combine design side at Deere and always tell him they need to add more chrome. BTW the 50 series is shit because of that. $300,000 combines with 250 hrs on them going in for $30-40,000 in repairs to fix worn out throats, and straw choppers. From what I can tell our wheat straw is more course then back east.



We're really fortunate here in the Willamette Valley. It is the grass seed capital of the world. More grass grown for seed is produced here than anywhere else in the US. It just doesn't grow good anywhere else. So the market is really a special niche and it keeps the price high. Perennial Ryegrass is worth about 60 cents a pound and it's not uncommon to see yields at about a ton per acre clean. I can't imagine trying to make a living on wheat, with the price around $3.75 a bushel.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:14:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By PromptCritical:

I hear the flatten hippy protesters pretty good too.



Damn right!
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:20:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dieselman:

We're really fortunate here in the Willamette Valley. It is the grass seed capital of the world. More grass grown for seed is produced here than anywhere else in the US. It just doesn't grow good anywhere else. So the market is really a special niche and it keeps the price high. Perennial Ryegrass is worth about 60 cents a pound and it's not uncommon to see yields at about a ton per acre clean. I can't imagine trying to make a living on wheat, with the price around $3.75 a bushel.



Awesome!

Seed farmers rock. There is one guy here in the Umpqua valley who does a bunch of it. He likes me alot (seems he hates those damn HONKERS)
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:23:12 PM EDT
I can relate to that! It's amazing the damage a flock of about 500 Canadian geese can do to a field.
I hate geese!
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:27:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2005 9:32:21 PM EDT by Dieselman]
Seeing how there seems to be some interest in this tonight, here is a pic of our other 9500 in action.



And one of our new 9500 next to our old 9500
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:33:02 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:36:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dieselman:

Originally Posted By WaMag:
We have three 6620 that we use for about 200 hrs a year, for about 1300 acres and another 4000 acres that we use custom harvest guys come in. Our combines are in the 2400-2800 hrs range. Was big into alfalfa seed in the 70's and 80's, now we're big into hay so we dont use combines as much. Didn't know that about grass seed. Try some dry peas and garbonzo beans, almost like buck shot, the combine with 2800hrs is in for a major overhaul.

Have a sister in law who has a friend that works in the combine design side at Deere and always tell him they need to add more chrome. BTW the 50 series is shit because of that. $300,000 combines with 250 hrs on them going in for $30-40,000 in repairs to fix worn out throats, and straw choppers. From what I can tell our wheat straw is more course then back east.



We're really fortunate here in the Willamette Valley. It is the grass seed capital of the world. More grass grown for seed is produced here than anywhere else in the US. It just doesn't grow good anywhere else. So the market is really a special niche and it keeps the price high. Perennial Ryegrass is worth about 60 cents a pound and it's not uncommon to see yields at about a ton per acre clean. I can't imagine trying to make a living on wheat, with the price around $3.75 a bushel.



$3.75 a bushel. You are talking Portland price. There is about 60 cents of freight taken off of that for our price. http://www.nwgrgr.com/ So ours is $3.16 right now. Lets just say thank God for insurance companies and government checks. We just signed up for CRC @85%. $8 for insurance an acre turns into a $200 gross no matter what. Just have to keep your inputs at a minium. Usually takes $110/ac to produse a crop. The way I look at it is this since our government has made it its right to put imbargos on half of the countries in the world, I'll take a check for them F*cking up our markets. We still haven't gotten over that Pakistan and India thing from the 90's That was our #1@#2 markets for SWW.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:37:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dieselman:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Time to take that 7700 to the combine demolition derby!!



Or just run them over with an old D8 Caterpillar, like I have done in the past!

This was the fate of my old JD 45 and JD 105
www.hunt101.com/img/330247.JPG
www.hunt101.com/img/330249.JPG



Dieselman,
Did you ever see the old JD 45 in the barn at the old Picken's place up South Abiqua near Timber Trail? Had both headers with it and didn't look like it had actually been used that much. I always thought it might be good for plots but they got rid of it a few years ago.
NMSight
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:42:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WaMag:

$3.75 a bushel. You are talking Portland price. There is about 60 cents of freight taken off of that for our price. http://www.nwgrgr.com/ So ours is $3.16 right now. Lets just say thank God for insurance companies and government checks. We just signed up for CRC @85%. $8 for insurance an acre turns into a $200 gross no matter what. Just have to keep your inputs at a minium. Usually takes $110/ac to produse a crop. The way I look at it is this since our government has made it its right to put imbargos on half of the countries in the world, I'll take a check for them F*cking up our markets. We still haven't gotten over that Pakistan and India thing from the 90's That was our #1@#2 markets for SWW.



God, I can't imagine being a wheat farmer. I don't know how you guys do it, even with subsidies. Pretty much nobody grows wheat here, unless they just need to rotate out of another crop to clean up the field. Even then it's damn rare to see a wheat field around here. We usually rotate into a Sugar Beet seed field or sprouting radish seed.
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 9:44:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/2/2005 9:53:16 PM EDT by Dieselman]

Originally Posted By NMSight:
Originally Posted By Dieselman:
Originally Posted By KA3B:

Dieselman,
Did you ever see the old JD 45 in the barn at the old Picken's place up South Abiqua near Timber Trail? Had both headers with it and didn't look like it had actually been used that much. I always thought it might be good for plots but they got rid of it a few years ago.
NMSight



No, I never seen it. The 45 is a neat little combine. I kind of hated to smash mine. But it was in such sad shape from sitting out in the rain for the last 20years that it just wasn't feasable to do anything else with it other than haul it in for scrap.


ETA- NMSight, do I remember you saying that you knew Nick from Universal seeds? Did you know that his fieldman Sean just died last week?
Link Posted: 10/2/2005 11:26:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:
smart move, I could never understand the need for the GPS but have to admit they're pretty cool. Even in my dumbest blond mode I can pay attention to where I'm going while listening to Rush!

Patty



It's about geting the best fuel efficiency from the equipment.

My father's a farmer and while he doesn't use GPS for his cropping equipment he's looked at it. If somone is into big acre farming (my father only has 1200 acres, which is not big for his area), using GPS autosteer on the tractors and harvesters can help cut fuel use by following the most fuel efficient pattern for the tractor/harvester to completely cover a field (as well as reducing general wear and tear on the machinery). If people are prepared to spend the money, they can get autosteer systems for their machinery that are claimed to be accurate to just under one inch (2 centimeters. 1 inch = 2.5 centimeters). What that means is if you plant crops in the same field two or more years in a row, the tractor/hartvester can follow exactly the same path each year, to within an inch (supposedly). When ploughing to plant crops, it's easier to plough soil that's been ploughed before rather than soil that hasn't been ploughed before (more fuel savings). With a one inch accuracy, the plough furrows can be within one inch of where they were last year.

This level of accuracy requires a base tower built on the farm that the autosteer equipment works with. You can't get this level of accuracy only from GPS sattelites. The price for a system this aqccurate? Tens of thousands.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 3:39:31 PM EDT
Nice, but there's one problem.....

They're green





WIZZO
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 3:44:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dieselman:
I can relate to that! It's amazing the damage a flock of about 500 Canadian geese can do to a field.
I hate geese!



It's amazing the damage a flock of about 5 arfcommers and tannerite can do to geese.
I hate geese too!
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:07:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zer04evr:

Originally Posted By Dieselman:
I can relate to that! It's amazing the damage a flock of about 500 Canadian geese can do to a field.
I hate geese!



It's amazing the damage a flock of about 5 arfcommers and tannerite can do to geese.
I hate geese too!



How about it Dieselman? ARFCOM Goose Hunt?! Patty
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:39:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pattymcn:

Originally Posted By zer04evr:

Originally Posted By Dieselman:
I can relate to that! It's amazing the damage a flock of about 500 Canadian geese can do to a field.
I hate geese!



It's amazing the damage a flock of about 5 arfcommers and tannerite can do to geese.
I hate geese too!



How about it Dieselman? ARFCOM Goose Hunt?! Patty



The problem is, alot of the fields have houses and public roads too close by.
And the Oregon Department of Agriculture is really cracking down on illegal goose hunting.
Otherwise I would be all for it. A good goose is a dead goose!
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:56:15 PM EDT
Ahhh the good ol days
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 4:56:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Dieselman:

Originally Posted By mjohn3006:
These are made by Colt.

www.mortier-agri.be/fotos/6920werk.jpg



I wouldn't mind that third one I think it is a 7800. Hard to tell in the picture.




Stay away from the 7800's. My brother was the shop manager for the local JD dealer and every 7800 they sold in a 4 county area ended up comming back for tranny repair. JD got smart and fixed the problems when the 7810's came out.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 5:12:34 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Notorious:

Stay away from the 7800's. My brother was the shop manager for the local JD dealer and every 7800 they sold in a 4 county area ended up comming back for tranny repair. JD got smart and fixed the problems when the 7810's came out.



Thanks, Good info to know. I'm actually looking at possibly purchasing a 8120 to replace the 4450.
Something with a little more size. I hear the 8000 series is quite componentized and the 7000 series is not.
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 5:33:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/6/2005 5:46:48 PM EDT by Notorious]

Originally Posted By Dieselman:

Originally Posted By Notorious:

Stay away from the 7800's. My brother was the shop manager for the local JD dealer and every 7800 they sold in a 4 county area ended up comming back for tranny repair. JD got smart and fixed the problems when the 7810's came out.



Thanks, Good info to know. I'm actually looking at possibly purchasing a 8120 to replace the 4450.
Something with a little more size. I hear the 8000 series is quite componentized and the 7000 series is not.



We got a 8110 about 4 years ago and it's one of the best tractors I've ever drove. From what I understand, the only difference betwean the 8110, 8210, and the 8310, is the HP.(different injecter settings), stickers on the side of the hood, and the cost. The 8410 might be a little bit heavier in the rear-end.

The 8020 series could be the same.

eta - we got the 8110 to replace our 4440 which we bought new in '82. A weird vibration occurs at about 1000 rpm, so we got the 8110 as a backup tractor (in case the 4440 blows-up) and for deep tilling.

It also helps with the taxes (buy tractor or pay .gov more money) Farming can be strange
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 5:42:11 PM EDT
well, guess I need to upgrade. I have a 8820 titan II and a 7700 they have been kept busy running beans this week. next weel probably will be changing one of them to corn
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 6:29:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By WaMag:

Originally Posted By Dieselman:
This is it! Pretty darn sharp and only 3000 hours.
www.hunt101.com/img/330227.JPG



I'll catch shit for this but...

Only 3000 hrs??? The life of a combine is 4000.



4000 hours, or until it's half paid for. Which ever comes first. You can't let those farmers get anything paid off, can we? They work best when in hock up to their eyeballs. It's the American way...

Bob
Link Posted: 10/6/2005 6:40:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By km:
well, guess I need to upgrade. I have a 8820 titan II and a 7700 they have been kept busy running beans this week. next weel probably will be changing one of them to corn



The 8820 Titan II is an Excellent machine. And it's hard to find fault with a 7700 as well.
I still feel that in sugar beets, I bring the seed in cleaner with the 7700 then with the 9500.
Probably because I am more experienced with setting up the 7700 than I am with the 9500.
We have only ran our first 9500 now for about 4 seasons. We had a 7720 before that. I really liked it, but had to sell it to pay for the 9500. It's just gtting too hard to find certain parts now days for the old 7700's. Don't brake the upper shieves on the variable speed cylinder drive, for these are obsolete parts no longer available through Deere!
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