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Posted: 1/7/2005 3:33:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/8/2005 9:40:50 PM EDT by svi40]
So I should give some background info first right. My roommate, god bless him for being the first one I have had that is not crazy/drug addicted/frattened/or teh ghey has a little fleabag puppy. I learned the puppy had fleas about a month and a half ago. Well, about a month ago, we both went home for Christmas break and didn't even think about the place until I got home lastnight. I walked into his room to see if he had gotten home yet and a horde of fleas jumped onto my legs. Now the little bastards have moved into my room and I have bites all over my legs and face.

While my AR is very effective against zombie hordes, it is useless against fleas. I'm thinking flamethrower but that is a bit counter productive. Do those foggers work that well? Is there a spray that you recommend? Am I stuck calling the Orkin man?  

I await your always wise and speedy responses.




Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:34:46 PM EDT
I would shoot off a few rounds w/ the AR just to make sure it's not effective against fleas.

I'm betting the muzzle blast keeps 'em down for a few minutes
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:35:46 PM EDT
HA-HA, you got fleas...

Go and DIP YOURSELF,
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:41:42 PM EDT
With that bad a problem you will have to bomb to git rid of them.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:42:13 PM EDT
The foggers suck. They will only kill the ones that have hatched they won't get the second hatch. About a week after you fog the place you'll have fleas again. Better call Orkin

AKASL
LIVE FREE OR DIE
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:43:01 PM EDT
Fogger, use as directed and then use another again in a couple of weeks after their larva hatch a new bunch. The eggs are not affected by the fogger, that's why you need to wait for the new crop to hatch and then fog the second time.



Or call a professional.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:44:22 PM EDT
A bomb will kill the fleas but the eggs will survive so you'll have to bomb and spray
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:45:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2005 3:48:56 PM EDT by CelesChere]
Eta: I can't read.

Fleas shouldn't be a problem unless the puppy is regularly treated for fleas. Unless the puppy hangs around a lot of fleabag mutts.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:45:53 PM EDT
Tannerite!!!
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:46:05 PM EDT
You are in for the fight of your life.  They are difficult as hell to get rid of.  My mom had a cat that she didn't get frontline for.  I made it stay in the basement since I hate cats.  One day I go down there in shorts and within seconds I had hundreds of fleas on my legs.  The cat would not touch the floor and tried to always make her way though using the boxes.

It took 4 months of frontline on the cat and constant spraying and treatment to kill them off to a level that was not noticeable.  Youd still get a bite or two but not hundreds.  I was so pissed with my mother I couldn't put in words.  We were trying to sell the gouse at the time and had to take it off the market over this.

Fleabusters works in carpeted areas but you must use a breeding inhibitor like frontline on the puppy and OFF on yourself to keep them from getting the blood they use to layt their eggs.  If they can't get it from the dogs they will turn to you.  Flea bombs did NOTHING to the fuckers that were in my basement.  I think it made them bigger and hungier.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:46:39 PM EDT
A fogger and get some Advantage or other flea killer and put it on the pup.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:47:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By svi40:
So I should give some background info first right. My roommate, god bless him for being the first one I have had that is not crazy/drug addicted/frattened/or teh ghey has a little fleabag puppy. I learned the puppy had fleas about a month and a half ago. Well, about a month ago, we both went home for Christmas break and didn't even think about the place until I got home lastnight. I walked into his room to see if he had gotten home yet and a horde of fleas jumped onto my legs. Now the little bastards have moved into my room and I have bites all over my legs and face.

While my AR is very effective against zombie hordes, it is useless against fleas. I'm thinking flamethrower but that is a bit counter productive. Do those foggers work that well? Is there a spray that you recommend? Am I stuck calling the Orkin man?  

I await your always wise and speedy responses.







IMO
I dont like foggers....
go to the petstore (not the grocery store....who knows how long they have been on the shelf) buy a carpet spray and a flea collar....
cut the flea collar in half....place half in your vacuum bag (if you dont own a vacuum BUY ONE)...vacuum the house and the couches....take the bag OUTSIDE to the trash...then spray the carpet and under the couch cushions....place remaining flea collar in new vacuum bag....
that should make a dent in them....if you want to nuke them out of your house....you can also use cat flea spray on your ankles....they like to hide in socks and shoes...bath the puppy in a flea shampoo (zodiac, cardinal...available at petstore...NOT TARGET ETC) and  place an organic flea collar on the puppy (normal flea collars suck, the flea has to cross the collar to die...organics run the pests off the animal...using eucalyptus oil I believe it is....you can get them at trader joes, some pet shops and all natural food stores)

I dont recommend buying flea products anywhere but a petstore because with other stores, you have no clue how long the items has been on the shelf and thus no clue how effective it is
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:53:53 PM EDT
Fogger or bomb. It'd be cheaper than the Orkin man. Then put flea collars on your ankles.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:57:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2005 3:59:28 PM EDT by Striker]
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:57:40 PM EDT

Originally Posted By AKASL:
The foggers suck. They will only kill the ones that have hatched they won't get the second hatch. About a week after you fog the place you'll have fleas again. Better call Orkin

AKASL
LIVE FREE OR DIE
NEW HAMPSHIRE



+1 Been there, done that.  Spend the $40 -$50
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 3:59:29 PM EDT
Forget bombs.  Forget flea collars.  Go to a vet, NOW, and get Advantage or Frontline.  I got frontline for my cats free from a friend who is a vet.  After a week or two, you'll notice that you're NOT getting bit much.  Keep applying for 3-6 months (I only had to do 4, and the fleas were gone for good).

It's been two years since I eradicated the fleas.  I hate those fuckers with a passion.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:02:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Nexus6:
Forget bombs.  Forget flea collars.  Go to a vet, NOW, and get Advantage or Frontline.  I got frontline for my cats free from a friend who is a vet.  After a week or two, you'll notice that you're NOT getting bit much.  Keep applying for 3-6 months (I only had to do 4, and the fleas were gone for good).

It's been two years since I eradicated the fleas.  I hate those fuckers with a passion.



but that wont kill what is alive and breeding in the house......advantage will keep them away from the dog...
BUT it is not his dog either....
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:07:31 PM EDT
Similar situation happened at my dad's house a few years ago.  The cat wouldn't walk on the floor at all b/c there were millions of the little buggers everywhere.  I went to the vet's office and got a product called 'Knockout' made by virbac.  (On the bottle it says it's only sold at veterinarian's offices).  It's an area treatment (spray) that kills fleas and their eggs for 4 months.  We sprayed it in every room of the house then left for the weekend and took the cat with us.  When we got back, we just vaccumed everything really well and that was that.  Put the cat on Frontline and never had another problem.  Never saw another flea.  

Come to think of it, I never saw another fly, or any other little pest like that, either.  And the plants all died, too...hmmmm...


Seriously though, you should look into it.  It absolutely rocked.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:22:27 PM EDT
Use Advantage or such on the dog.

For the house, I don't like to fill the place I eat and sleep in with harmfull pesticides.
An apartment I lived in got a severe infestation when the neighbor cat lady got her apartment cleaned out. They fled her place and infested all of us neighbors. So, what I did one time was heat the place I lived up to about 130F. Don't recall exactly, but it was, I know, over 125F. You hold it there for a couple hours and that will kill every flea in the place. Adults, pupae, juveniles and even eggs.

Zap! Right now!

To get it there I turned the heat all the way up and fired up a couple kerosene heaters. You've got to keep it there for several hours so that the heat soaks in to upholstery and cracks in the floor. The fleas try to escape the heat by burrowing. so start it up in the morning and turn it off when you get off for lunch or come home in the evening.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:32:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:36:51 PM EDT
130F ??  Bullshit.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:42:17 PM EDT
I had fleas take over my house this summer.  It sucked really bad.  I could feel the little bastards crawling all over me and I was constantly itching even when I was out of the house!

A lot of good information has already been posted.  I'll post a couple warnings, even if you follow everything posted here be prepared for it to take a couple months to get rid of the fleas.  DO NOT get any flea treatments from Wal-mart or a pet store, they do not work and it has been reported they can give animals seizures.  I've tried them all, the only ones that work are the flea shampoos but they only keep fleas off for a couple days and you can only use them once every 2 weeks.

Go to the vet and get Revolution.  It not only kills the fleas but it also is good for prevention of heartworm disease, fleas, the American dog tick, ear mites and canine sarcoptic mange.  I tried the Wal-mart treatments, no impact.  I tried Frontline and got a 50% reduction in fleas.  I followed up with Revolution and 99% of the fleas were gone the first month.

Fogging the house will work for the short term.  At least I stopped itching when I did it.  Also get the carpet flea powder and use it once a week.  Vacuume everything once a week including carpets, rugs, and furniture.  Keep your clothes picked and washed.  Wash all your bedding.

If you want immediate relief, do the following.  Get Revolution and treat the puppy immediately.  Buy the foggers and carpet powder.  Pick up every piece of clothing not in a closet or draw and wash it.  Take all the bedding and wash it.  Then fog the house.  Once the fog is clear put the carpet powder down and let it sit like it's supposed to.  Vacuume the powder up and all the furniture, including your bed.  Then put everything back the way it was.  You might have to repeate this process a second time in about 2 weeks as flea eggs hatch in 10 days.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:52:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2005 5:01:21 PM EDT by TacticalMan]

Originally Posted By T56:
130F ??  Bullshit.



Don't knock it till you try it.


It works RIGHT NOW.




Tests have indicated that cat flea larvae die after exposure to 103o F for one hour, and researchers have developed techniques to raise the temperature in a room enough to provide this exposure. The heating process uses a common heating unit modified to include special blowers and flexible ducts. Companies have been using heat to kill termites and woodboring beetles for a number of years, and now some companies are experimenting with heat to control fleas. One potential problem with this technique is that fleas can burrow down into carpets and upholstery, and perhaps escape lethal temperatures.

Killing Fleas with Heat
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 4:53:13 PM EDT
Have your carpets steamed cleaned that will suck every one of those fucking lil suckers right out . We use to use to Fumagaters from Raid I think they worked pretty good , they area gas instead of a spray you add water to the container to activate them and they start smoking. Do not forget to take out your batteries out of your smoke alarmsAnd repeat after a few weeks with them. GOOD LUCK ITCH ITCH
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 5:02:08 PM EDT
Fleas live to suck blood, lay eggs and die.

You need to break the flea cycle.
It's about 7-12 days from egg to blood sucking.

Get the dog flea dipped.
Get the dog on Advantage.

Foggers work great to kill 70% of the fleas that are alive.
Flea spray from Home Depot works great to kill 80% of the fleas + it will have some effect on the next generation of fleas.

Vacuum the crap out of the carpet.
Get all of the hair.
Clean up where the dog craps and lays down.
Toss any dog specific bedding.
Steam clean your carpets.
Wash all of your sheets.

Get diatomaceous earth and Borax and toss it out on the carpet.
That will fuck up the fleas outer shell and cause them to dehydrate.

Do a google on fleas + Borax + diatomaceous earth.

While the dog is getting flea dipped you might as well get it dewormed too, cause if it has fleas you can bet that it won't be long before worms are coming out of its ass.

Link Posted: 1/7/2005 5:11:58 PM EDT
I brought fleas home with me from work one day (I had seen a whole litter of puppies that were being overrun). A few weeks later, my house had fleas in it as well.

I didn't want to bomb the house, so I used Frontline on my indoor-only cat for three months and used him as a flea trap. Contrary to what was stated before, Frontline and Advantage are insecticidal and will kill fleas, not repel them.  You have to treat for multiple consecutive months because of new hatches. It didn't take long to notice a decrease in the number of bites I was getting on my ankles.

When you go to pick something up, avoid getting AdvanTIX if there are any cats around the place. AdvantAGE and Frontline are both excellent products to use in dog and cat households.

-Hobbit, DVM.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 5:12:45 PM EDT
wear a flea collar and they won't bother you.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 6:54:35 PM EDT
I use borax instead of the flea powders for the carpets.  A fogger or spray will normally knock the fleas down to where you can at least deal with cleaning a room.

On the diatomacious earth there are 2 types.  One is common for pool filters I think, and the other one is what you want.  It and borax are great at getting rid of bugs that have shells.

And getting rid of clutter like card board boxes is excellant advice.  
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 8:23:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2005 8:28:10 PM EDT by Voodoo17]
There is a flea ointment that goes on the back of the head of a pet which will kill, and I mean kill the entire bunch(gagle, flock?).  Had to buy it at a vets but it really works.  I didn't believe it when I bought it but one application on the back of the three cats my wife keeps did them all in.  Learned about the stuff from a pet groomer and the crap really worked.  She told me that it will kill /stop reinfestation and I do mean it works.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 8:27:11 PM EDT
(A) Bomb the place twice.

(B) From previous experience you don't need a vet, but you need something Good.  Anything made by ZODIAC is top notch.  Bathing my cats twice cured all flea problems I've had and I've had some good ones.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 8:28:44 PM EDT
My vet told me this trick years ago. It sounds weird, but I've used it several times and it works really well:

Get two or three aluminum pie plates and an equal number of desk lamps. You need to have a plate and a desk lamp for each room you want to treat.

Pour about a half inch of water into each plate, then mix in about a teaspoon of salt and a tablespoon or two of flea-killing shampoo.

Place the plate in the middle of the floor and shine the lamp directly into it. Leave it on overnight.

The heat and the smell of  the salty water will drive the fleas batshit because they'll think there's an animal in the room. They'll jump right into the pan and the shampoo will do them in. The salt supposedly makes it more attractive, but I myself don't know if fleas can smell. Use it just in case they can.

You might have to do this over the course of a few days, but you will find dead fleas every morning.

Obviously, this will not be effective unless the animals in your house are treated with Frontline or something else to eliminate the fleas' food source.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 8:47:52 PM EDT
Adams flea spray in the blue and red bottle in most farm and pet stores will wipe them out! Frontline for the dog and some Off! for yourself in the mean time.
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 9:30:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2005 9:34:30 PM EDT by Grunteled]

Originally Posted By SkullFarmer:
My vet told me this trick years ago. It sounds weird, but I've used it several times and it works really well:

Get two or three aluminum pie plates and an equal number of desk lamps. You need to have a plate and a desk lamp for each room you want to treat.

Pour about a half inch of water into each plate, then mix in about a teaspoon of salt and a tablespoon or two of flea-killing shampoo.

Place the plate in the middle of the floor and shine the lamp directly into it. Leave it on overnight.

The heat and the smell of  the salty water will drive the fleas batshit because they'll think there's an animal in the room. They'll jump right into the pan and the shampoo will do them in. The salt supposedly makes it more attractive, but I myself don't know if fleas can smell. Use it just in case they can.

You might have to do this over the course of a few days, but you will find dead fleas every morning.

Obviously, this will not be effective unless the animals in your house are treated with Frontline or something else to eliminate the fleas' food source.

Good luck.



It's a good way to check to see if you still have them, but you won't get enought to completly rid you place of them without other means.  You don't need flea shampoo either.  Just a dab of soap... any kind...  You just need to break the surface tension of the water and they will simply drown in the water.  If you don't use soap, they will float on the surface tension till they reach the edge and crawl right out.

Heat, and CO2 are the primary things they sense.  I don't know about salt so I can't comment.  I used that method to determine if my other steps were working.  At first the plate would be covered in them... hundreds. 5 weeks later it was down to 5 or 6 a night.  Those last few were hungry bastards too.  They would be on you in seconds and bite almost instantly.

You have to get the eggs and the larva, and stop the cycle or your spinning your wheels.  One blood sucking female gets a meal and you have many hundreds more produced.  They are evil, pure evil.

ETA:  You can't out-wait them either.  If you just leave the place vacant they will go dormant.  They can stay that way for a year.  Later when you return your vibration and CO2 cause the adults to wake up and any unhatched eggs to break out.  Again.... EVIL!
Link Posted: 1/7/2005 10:09:47 PM EDT

Originally Posted By entropy:

Originally Posted By AKASL:
The foggers suck. They will only kill the ones that have hatched they won't get the second hatch. About a week after you fog the place you'll have fleas again. Better call Orkin

AKASL
LIVE FREE OR DIE
NEW HAMPSHIRE



+1 Been there, done that.  Spend the $40 -$50



When I was in Boy Scouts I used to wear flea/tick colars around my ankels while backpacking, helps keep the little biters off so you can have a little peace. Just got through whith this shit agin when my wife and son brough a stray home. I had the hometeam (same as Orkin) spray my wifes car down too. if you want the little bastards dead call the professionals, they have the correct licenses to have the full concentration poisons.  good luck........
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:17:54 PM EDT
We had a couple of stray dogs we had to pick up while at work at my P.D.  this year that were infested with them.  We canceled our contract  with the Humnae Society so we built kennels to keep them in till the owner calls them in missing.  Nothing is more irritating than picking them off your neck or legs.  Basterds are a bitch to pinch too.  Anyway we sprayed Hartz Home Flea and Tick Killer from WalMart in the squad and all over the PD and seemed to kill them in a day or two.  We didn't have a huge infestation but it sucked none the less.  Worked in our case.  Good Luck , RnR
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:25:07 PM EDT
It hasn't been said yet so....

Take off and nuke the site from orbit.  It the only way to sure.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:39:20 PM EDT
UPDATE:

Well, I moved all of my shit into the living room (which wasn't very badly infested) and bombed my room and my roommates room. The bomb seemed to kill everything because I have seen no fleas on my legs when I walk into the rooms. Before I would see dozens jump onto me. I also bought some flea carpet powder and left it for 4 hours, 3 hours more than recommended . After this I vacuumed the ever living shit out of the carpet. Hopefully this will put a good dent in the infestation. Fleabag dog and roomate will be back Monday though so who knows where this will go. Thank you for all of your help guys, good advice and experience.

I'll probably have another f*cking infestation in another week after the eggs hatch, but for now I'm happy. I will be looking into purchasing a nuke just incase
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 9:40:19 PM EDT
go get some kind of flea killer concentrate and a pump up sprayer. Spray the entire surface area of your floor, carpet and hard surfaces and even couch. Spray every 3 days for 3 times. It will take a total of 9 days. You won't have another bug for several years. I do this ALL the time in my rental property and in the last 15 years have had to do it in my home maybe 4 times. It is foolproof and has never failed.
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 10:08:17 PM EDT
what are these bites on my arms?!?!?!
Link Posted: 1/8/2005 10:14:15 PM EDT
RIDDING YOUR HOME OF FLEAS
by Mike Potter, Extension Entomologist
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ridding a home of fleas can be a frustrating and costly endeavor. Unlike some pests encountered around the home, fleas cause discomfort and irritation to both pets and people. Fleas account for more than half of all dermatological conditions requiring veterinary assistance, and even a single flea bite to a hypersensitive animal or person may cause intense itching and irritation.

For successful flea control, the home, pet and oftentimes, the yard must be treated. Yet the manner in which these treatments are performed can greatly influence the results. The following information will help frustrated pet owners effectively rid their homes and pets of fleas.

Essential Facts About Fleas
Adult fleas (the biting stage seen by pet owners) spend most of their time on the animal, not in the carpet. This is why treatment of the pet in conjunction with the pet's environment is an essential step in ridding a home of fleas.

Adult fleas lay all of their eggs (up to 50 per day) on the pet. However, the eggs soon fall off the animal into carpeting, beneath the cushions of furniture, and wherever else the pet rests, sleeps or spends most of its time. This is where homeowners should focus control measures.

After hatching, flea eggs develop into tiny, worm-like larvae. Larvae remain hidden deep in carpet fibers, beneath furniture cushions and in other protected areas. The larvae feed mainly on adult flea feces (dried blood) which accumulates, along with the eggs, in pet resting and activity areas.

Before becoming adult fleas, the larvae transform into pupae within a silk-like cocoon. Pupae remain inside the cocoon for 2 to 4 weeks, sometimes longer. The cocoon is resistant to insecticides and this is why some adult fleas are seen for an extended period, even after the home and pet are treated.

Treatment of Premises
If you neglect to treat the pet's environment (the premises), you will miss more than 90% of the developing flea population -- the eggs, larvae and pupae. If the pet spends time indoors, the interior of the home should also be treated. Before treatment, the pet owner should:



Remove all toys, clothing, and stored items from floors, under beds, and in closets. This step is essential so that all areas will be accessible for treatment.

Remove pet food and water dishes, cover fish tanks, and disconnect their aerators.

Wash, dry-clean or destroy all pet bedding.

Vacuum! -- vacuuming removes many of the eggs, larvae and pupae developing within the home. Vacuuming also stimulates pre-adult fleas to emerge sooner from their insecticide-resistant cocoons, thus hastening their contact with insecticide residues in the carpet. By raising the nap of the carpet, vacuuming improves the insecticide's penetration down to the base of the carpet fibers where the developing fleas live. Vacuum thoroughly, especially in areas where pets rest or sleep. Don't forget to vacuum along edges of rooms and beneath furniture, cushions, beds, and throw rugs. After vacuuming, seal the vacuum bag in a garbage bag and discard it in an outdoor trash container.
Insecticide Application - Once fleas become established in a home, insecticides are almost always needed to control them. Always read and follow label directions on the insecticide container. Other than the person performing the application, people and pets should be out of the house during treatment. People and pets should also remain off treated surfaces until the spray has dried. This may take several hours, depending on carpet type, ventilation and method of application. Opening windows and running the fan or air conditioner after treatment will enhance drying and minimize odor.

Many different products are available for home treatment. The most effective formulations contain both an adulticide (e.g., permethrin) effective against the biting adult stage, and an insect growth regulator (methoprene or pyriproxyfen), necessary to provide long-term suppression of the eggs, larvae and pupae. Pet owners will need to carefully read the “active ingredients” panel on the product label to determine if these ingredients are present. Examples include Raid Flea Killer Plus(R), Siphotrol Plus(R), , Bio Flea Halt(TM), and Fleatrol(R). Most homeowners will find aerosol formulations easier to apply than liquids. Moreover, aerosol products which can be dispensed by hand -- and thus directed under and behind beds, furniture, etc. -- tend to be more effective than “foggers” or “bug bombs” which are indiscriminately set off in the center of a room. It is essential that the application be thorough and include all likely areas of flea development. Carpets, throw rugs, under and behind beds and furniture, and beneath cushions on which pets sleep should all be treated. Pay particular attention to areas where pets spend time or sleep, as these will be the areas where most flea eggs, larvae and pupae will be concentrated. For example, if the family cat sleeps within a closet, or hides under the bed, these areas must be treated or the problem will continue. Hardwood and tile floors generally do not require treatment, but should be thoroughly vacuumed.

Expect to see some fleas for 2 weeks or longer following treatment. Provided all infested areas were treated initially, these "survivors" are probably newly emerged adults which have not yet succumbed to the insecticide. Instead of retreating the premises immediately, continue to vacuum. As noted earlier, vacuuming stimulates the insecticide-resistant pupae to hatch, bringing the newly emerged adults into contact with the insecticide sooner. Flea traps, such as those utilizing a light and glue board to attract and capture adult fleas, can be helpful but will not eliminate a flea infestation unless used in combination with other methods. If adult fleas continue to be seen beyond 2-4 weeks, retreatment of the premises (and pet) may be necessary.

Treatment of Pet
It is important that the pet be treated in conjunction with the premises, preferably on the same day. Adult fleas spend virtually their entire life on the animal -- not in the carpet. Untreated pets will continue to be bothered by fleas. They may also transport fleas in from outdoors, eventually overcoming the effectiveness of the insecticide applied inside the home.

Pets can be treated either by a veterinarian or the pet owner. A variety of on-animal formulations are available that may be prescribed by veterinarians. Many provide only short-term relief against biting adults (a few hours to a few weeks); however, two new veterinarian-supplied products, Advantage and Frontline, control adult fleas on pets for 1 and 3 months, respectively. Some products also contain an insect growth regulator (IGR) to prevent eggs from hatching as they are laid on the animal (e.g., Raid Flea Killer Plus, Ovitrol Plus(R), Bio Spot(TM)). Convenient, long-term prevention of egg hatch can be accomplished either with the Ovitrol(R) Flea Egg Collar, or Program(R), administered orally to pets as a tablet. (See ENTFACT 628 - A Smarter Approach To Flea Control). Both of these products are available through veterinarians.

Pet owners should always read the product label. Certain products can be used only on dogs, and some list specific treatment procedures for puppies and kittens. Do not treat pets with the same products used to treat carpeting or the yard. As previously mentioned, it is important that pets be kept off treated carpets and surfaces until the spray has completely dried.

To re-cap, "de-fleaing" the pet is an essential step in ridding a home of fleas. However, pet owners must also treat the pet's environment, the home. Having your pet dipped will not, in itself, eliminate fleas in an infested home.

Link Posted: 1/9/2005 1:34:21 AM EDT
sprinkle BORAX on the floor and vaccum, if you did this once a month you would be set.

SPRAY POISON OUTSIDE all around the house and bushes, keeps the dog from picking them up when its outside.

dont know if the electronic noise emitters work or not, but they should be cheap and plug into the wall, so why not try it.
i think they have the same thing but on a collar for the pooch to wear, so it never picks up and transfers fleas to start with.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 2:18:18 AM EDT
+1 revolution.  Also treat yard w/triaznon. Will help keep from reinfest.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 2:31:42 AM EDT
1.  Get a pill called Capstar from the vet (Kills fleas on pet within 1 hour or so) ***DO this BEFORE your roomate brings the dog back into your home.

2.  Put dog on a pill from the vet called Sentinnel once a month (Makes fleas sterile so they can't reproduce-breaks cycle)

Fleas are easily picked up when walking your dog around the neighborhood.  I have been using Sentinnel for almost 10 years and have seen maybe 2 total fleas and are usually in the process of dying.  Good Luck
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 3:58:02 PM EDT
here is what we have done that will end your problem. It's cheap and simple. sprinkle baby powder on the dog, the rug, the furniture, everywhere. your  fleas will die. eggs? salt on the floor, the furniture, ect. now they all are dead, they will eat it immediatley after hatching. my sisters have had bad infestations at their houses, so bad the cat almost died at one house. this killed all of them within a week, gone. hope you didn't spend a ton of money on these other tries at it.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:36:30 PM EDT
Dip your balls in Borax and you will be fine.
Link Posted: 1/9/2005 11:57:32 PM EDT
My vet say's there is a pill you can give dog's that almost instantly kills fleas. I forget how long it lasts.

Here it is......

www.petwellness.com/dog_capstar_home.asp

Works like a champ.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 12:16:08 AM EDT
Salt works.  You can use rock salt or table salt.  A mixture of Borax and salt works well.  Careful though, Borax is not too good for young chillun....
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 11:37:07 AM EDT
Argggggggggg my flea problem has surfaced again.  I thought I had gotten rid of them months ago and I haven't found any on the cats yet but I'm bit up all over.  I traced it down to this.  Over the weekend I cleaned and vacuumed the bedroom, changed the sheets on my bed and pulled out a heavier comforter from the bottom shelf of my closet.  Those damn fleas must have escape to my closet when I was destorying them earlier this summer and either went dormant or laid a ton of eggs on the comforter.  So by pulling it out of the closet and putting it on the bed I awake the sleep army of fleas and unknowingly gave them the perfect place to feed.  My cats have been laying on the bed which means they are all infested again.  Now I have to move really quick and get them treated before the first batch has time to reproduce.

So the lesson of the day is, if you have fleas wash EVERYTHING after you have gotten rid of them.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 12:31:51 PM EDT
Used to have a major flea infestation in my parents house. Borax around the wallboards and vacumn every day. Vac first, then put down the borax...will take about 2 weeks to break the cycle but you'll see an effect in 1 day. Can use some of the flea sprays on the carpet to put down the msot active ones that first day, but the borax is what'll do the trick.

For the dog? that stuff that goes on their shoulders works good...Don't use flea collars on yourself, you'll absorb that stuff thru your skin and get very sick.

Good luck, and post results.
Link Posted: 1/10/2005 1:58:47 PM EDT
Nexus6 wins the prize for the correct response. Frontline or Advantage from the vet applied to the puppy will eliminate the fleas in the house. Do not turn your home into a toxic waste dump with over the counterbombs, foggers, powders, tannerite, LSD, Rock, Meth.....
Link Posted: 1/11/2005 9:51:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By bvmjethead:
My vet say's there is a pill you can give dog's that almost instantly kills fleas. I forget how long it lasts.



Capstar +1000
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