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Posted: 1/12/2005 1:12:30 PM EDT
www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?s=2776926


By Sarah Thomsen

If you're ticketed by Green Bay police, you'll get more than a fine. You'll get fingerprinted, too. It's a new way police are cracking down on crime.

If you're caught speeding or playing your music too loud, or other crimes for which you might receive a citation, Green Bay police officers will ask for your drivers license and your finger. You'll be fingerprinted right there on the spot. The fingerprint appears right next to the amount of the fine.

Police say it's meant to protect you -- in case the person they're citing isn't who they claim to be. But not everyone is sold on that explanation.

"What we've seen happen for the last couple of years [is] increasing use of false or fraudulent identification documents," Captain Greg Urban said.

Police say they want to prevent the identity theft problem that Milwaukee has, where 13 percent of all violators give a false name.

But in Green Bay, where police say they only average about five cases in a year, drivers we talked with think the new policy is extreme.

"That's going too far," Ken Scherer from Oconto said. "You look at the ID, that's what they're there for. Either it's you or it's not. I don't think that's a valid excuse."

"I would feel uncomfortable but I would do it," Carol Pilgrim of Green Bay said.

Citizens do have the right to say no. "They could say no and not have to worry about getting arrested," defense attorney Jackson Main said. "On the other hand, I'm like everybody else. When a police officer tells me to do something, I'm going to do it whether I have the right to say no or not."

That's exactly why many drivers are uneasy about the fine print in this fingerprinting policy.

Police stress that the prints are just to make sure you are who you claim to be and do not go into any kind of database; they simply stay on the ticket for future reference if the identity is challenged.
Link Posted: 1/12/2005 1:16:02 PM EDT
Nope. Update came out on this morning's news. They won't be fingerprinting with traffic citations, so you can put the belt sander away.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 7:59:17 AM EDT
Big Brother in action.  
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 8:21:50 AM EDT


"On the other hand, I'm like everybody else. When a police officer tells me to do something, I'm going to do it whether I have the right to say no or not."





Sad that's what we are becoming.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 8:29:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greg3:
www.wbay.com/Global/story.asp?s=2776926


By Sarah Thomsen

If you're ticketed by Green Bay police, you'll get more than a fine. You'll get fingerprinted, too. It's a new way police are cracking down on crime.

If you're caught speeding or playing your music too loud, or other crimes for which you might receive a citation, Green Bay police officers will ask for your drivers license and your finger. You'll be fingerprinted right there on the spot. The fingerprint appears right next to the amount of the fine.

Police say it's meant to protect you -- in case the person they're citing isn't who they claim to be. But not everyone is sold on that explanation.

"What we've seen happen for the last couple of years [is] increasing use of false or fraudulent identification documents," Captain Greg Urban said.

Police say they want to prevent the identity theft problem that Milwaukee has, where 13 percent of all violators give a false name.

But in Green Bay, where police say they only average about five cases in a year, drivers we talked with think the new policy is extreme.

"That's going too far," Ken Scherer from Oconto said. "You look at the ID, that's what they're there for. Either it's you or it's not. I don't think that's a valid excuse."

"I would feel uncomfortable but I would do it, Cause I be scared of the police." Carol Pilgrim of Green Bay said.

Citizens do have the right to say no. "They could say no and not have to worry about getting arrested," defense attorney Jackson Main said. "On the other hand, I'm like everybody else. When a police officer tells me to do something, I'm going to do it whether I have the right to say no or not. Cause I'm a WUSSIE! And I do everything that people tell me too. I know my rights, but people with guns scare me and make me pee my pants."

That's exactly why many drivers are uneasy about the fine print in this fingerprinting policy.

Police stress that the prints are just to make sure you are who you claim to be and do not go into any kind of database; they simply stay on the ticket for future reference if the identity is challenged.




Is 90 percent of the population to day this stupid and affraid?
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 8:34:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tommytrauma:
Nope. Update came out on this morning's news. They won't be fingerprinting with traffic citations, so you can put the belt sander away.



Good decision.
This was going to end up with someone getting shot.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 8:36:26 AM EDT
Yeah, you want my fingerprints, Big Brother can have them after they pry them off my gun. I know my rights and I'm going to defend them. Period.
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:05:10 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 2whiskeyP:


"On the other hand, I'm like everybody else. When a police officer tells me to do something, I'm going to do it whether I have the right to say no or not."





Sad that's what we are becoming.



+1
Link Posted: 1/13/2005 10:20:53 AM EDT
Why fingerprint?

I thought we could just scan that microchip that was planted in the back of your right wrist!


You think I'm joking? Just wait until a disaster of tsunami proportion happens on THIS continent. Enough people will try to file false death claims or develop new identities that it WILL HAPPEN, just watch and see
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