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Posted: 3/27/2009 7:55:43 AM EDT
Ok, a few cooking (discussion) questions:

1) Do you use butter or oil when making a roux?
2) low heat for a long time, or medium heat for less time?


3) When cooking the trinity (bell pepper, celery, onion) do you cook them separate, or do you stir them into the roux?

4) Gumbo: Okra, file` powder, or both?

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 7:57:55 AM EDT
For gumbo I use oil. Low med heat stirring constantly for gumbo the roux will have to be very dark, about 20-25 minutes.

Cook the veg together.

Okra
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 7:58:58 AM EDT
Depending on what the roux is for, I use different fat. I try not to waste anything, so it is oftentimes bacon drippings or sausage grease.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:00:40 AM EDT
I use UNSALTED butter

for a roux you want to make very dark (like for gumbo) low and slow is better IMO

for a medium or blond roux i used higher heat since i dont need to worry about making it dark and thus dont need to worry about burning it
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:01:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By acegunner:
For gumbo I use oil. Low med heat stirring constantly for gumbo the roux will have to be very dark, about 20-25 minutes.

Cook the veg together.

Okra


This don't rush your roux let it slow simmer and take it's time.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:02:31 AM EDT
use oil, low med heat, i use a wisk instead of a spoon to stir it constantly.., not as much racket. always watch your heat and dont let it start smoking. roux is ready when its about the color of a snickers bar. a heavy cast iron skillet works the best for me.It usually takes me about 35-40 minutes to get it done.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:02:34 AM EDT
tag for dinner pic, hopefully with lots of instructions
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:02:49 AM EDT
I'd start to sweat the vegetables in butter, then when you are ready add the flour and start cooking the roux to the stage you would like. The darker the roux gets, the less thickening power it has.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:06:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By mark75101:
tag for dinner pic, hopefully with lots of instructions



I made a gorgeous creation last night.

I made a roux, added my vegetables and spices to it (as the roux browned), then some tomato sauce and part of a can of ro-tel, then a half-pint of heavy whipping cream, then a pound of smoked sausage, a pound of chicken, and a pound of shrimp.

After all that work, I realized I was out of rice (duh!) and had to just eat it without the rice.

It was beautiful, it was delicious, and there's enough left for dinner tonight.

Sorry, no pictures.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:07:52 AM EDT
you can also add a little kitchen bouquet to your gumbo as its cooking if it isnt dark enough for you. Presentation is important
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:13:24 AM EDT
Add an ounce of Cholula or Cajun Chef before eating...WOW is it good!

HH
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:13:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Ok, a few cooking (discussion) questions:

1) Do you use butter or oil when making a roux?
2) low heat for a long time, or medium heat for less time?


3) When cooking the trinity (bell pepper, celery, onion) do you cook them separate, or do you stir them into the roux?

4) Gumbo: Okra, file` powder, or both?



A:
1) Depends on your dish. If you have a soup with loads of cream/dairy in it, using butter is your best bet. For Gumbo, I use oil due to the fact you have to cook it to a dark color, and butter will taste burnt by then.

2)If you are making Gumbo, you use the trinity to stop the Roux. When you get it to color, remove the roux from the heat and carefully mix in the trinity-it will cook the veggies partially and lower the temp of the Roux so it does not keep cooking and burn.

3)Both. Gumbo gets its Green Tea sort of flavor and a bit of thickening from the File'(which is made from sassafrass leaves BTW). Okra provides another flavor and texture to the Gumbo.

I learned to make Gumbo/Cajun dishes when I worked with a chef by the name of Jan Birnbaum at a place called Catahoula(which closed about 6 years ago) that was located in Calistoga, CA. He trained under master Cajun Chef Paul Prodhomme.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:14:44 AM EDT
tag for updates.




I think I do not let mine cook enough.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:26:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 8:26:36 AM EDT by fastmover]
oil, low heat and your grandma reminding you every 12 seconds stir it , don't burn, stir it, it don't burn it.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:28:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/27/2009 8:32:13 AM EDT by Claybrook]
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Ok, a few cooking (discussion) questions:

1) Do you use butter or oil when making a roux?
2) low heat for a long time, or medium heat for less time?


3) When cooking the trinity (bell pepper, celery, onion) do you cook them separate, or do you stir them into the roux?

4) Gumbo: Okra, file` powder, or both?



I use oil.
Low heat for a long time. Stir constantly until it's a dark brown color.
I stir them in once the roux is done.
I use neither. Mine thinckened up nicely after simmering nearly all day. I hate okra, so I would never add it under any circumstances. That's just my opinion though.

Edit to add this YouTube video: Gumbo How to I just altered it to suite my taste.




Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:29:55 AM EDT
the kind of fat you use is directly related to the kind of roux you want to make.. I would probably use oil for gumbo..
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:34:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Mall-Ninja:
Depending on what the roux is for, I use different fat. I try not to waste anything, so it is oftentimes bacon drippings or sausage grease.


Damn, that sounds delicious.

~BakerMike
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:36:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Originally Posted By mark75101:
tag for dinner pic, hopefully with lots of instructions



I made a gorgeous creation last night.

I made a roux, added my vegetables and spices to it (as the roux browned), then some tomato sauce and part of a can of ro-tel, then a half-pint of heavy whipping cream, then a pound of smoked sausage, a pound of chicken, and a pound of shrimp.

After all that work, I realized I was out of rice (duh!) and had to just eat it without the rice.

It was beautiful, it was delicious, and there's enough left for dinner tonight.

Sorry, no pictures.


Rice is just filler anyway. Sounds GOOD
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 8:37:43 AM EDT
I do high heat, short duration using vegetable oil (Prudhomme method). Occasionally, I will use bacon drippings which means low heat, long duration.

I put half my Trinity in the roux to stop it from cooking and add the other half to the stock after the roux is stirred in. I also add half my seasoning to the roux and half straight to the pot.

I'm not a big okra fan, so file.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:05:43 AM EDT
Next question:

How finely do you chop your veggies?

I like chunks of BP, onion chopped as finely as possible, and celery somewhere in between.

??
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:11:52 AM EDT
you may also find helpful the food forum over in outdoor section - there is a dedicated chef there to answer your questions, chefdouglasmorris...


enjoy.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:14:44 AM EDT
Alton Brown had an episode of good eats devoted to gumbo.

here's the recipie: Shrimp Gumbo

If you can catch a rerun of that episode he explains things really well and answers most of your questions.

I think he even makes his roux in the oven to save some stirring.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:17:35 AM EDT
I buy my roux in a jar. Spoon it into hot water slowly to get the right consistentcy. Then throw
in the trinity.
But if you insist on making your own, use a cast iron pot and use some oil. Stir constantly.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:18:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By adamtheduke:
Alton Brown had an episode of good eats devoted to gumbo.

here's the recipie: Shrimp Gumbo

If you can catch a rerun of that episode he explains things really well and answers most of your questions.

I think he even makes his roux in the oven to save some stirring.


I've found that on low heat, constant stirring isn't as necessary as people think.

i actually made an appetizer dip yesterday while my roux was cooking, I'd stop and stir every minute or two, and it turned out fine - but I was using VERY low heat.

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:33:56 AM EDT
I like to use pork lard from the Mexican market for my roux. (butter solids burn too easily) Stirring is only needed enough to keep from burning. At lower heat I sometimes stir every 5 minutes or so. I like finely chopped veggies for flavor in every bite, but you can always add some bigger chunks for textural or visual appeal.

I think the hardest part of making good gumbo for me is finding good andouille sausage.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:41:57 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Harvster:
I like to use pork lard from the Mexican market for my roux. (butter solids burn too easily) Stirring is only needed enough to keep from burning. At lower heat I sometimes stir every 5 minutes or so. I like finely chopped veggies for flavor in every bite, but you can always add some bigger chunks for textural or visual appeal.

I think the hardest part of making good gumbo for me is finding good andouille sausage.


I can't find it here locally, so I just use smoked sausage. I can find raw shrimp, crawfish, most any kind of seafood i want, but I have never seen andouille sausage here locally.



In college I had friends from southern MS/LA, and I never had a problem getting andouille, boudan (sp?) or fresh raw oysters, for that matter.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:42:50 AM EDT
I use oil and keep stirring it. Any black specs and you have ruined it.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 10:54:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arowneragain:
Ok, a few cooking (discussion) questions:

1) Do you use butter or oil when making a roux?
2) low heat for a long time, or medium heat for less time?


3) When cooking the trinity (bell pepper, celery, onion) do you cook them separate, or do you stir them into the roux?

4) Gumbo: Okra, file` powder, or both?



1. oil
2. cast iron skillet in a 400 F oven for 45 - 75 minutes stiring every 15 minutes. (You can bash the technique, but you can't argue the results...)
3. stir into the roux
4. either, or, both, and sometimes none. depends on my mood
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 11:14:05 AM EDT
I use butter but have to stir constantly.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:53:30 PM EDT
roux is for you french wussies

I eat GRAVY; it's the only manly "roux" there is.
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:56:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By zuuk:
roux is for you french wussies

I eat GRAVY; it's the only manly "roux" there is.


You have to make a roux to get gravy...you just add milk...this is called a Bechamel (one of the 5 mother sauces)

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 12:58:06 PM EDT
Not gumbo specific:

1. Usually butter but sometimes oil. Never tried bacon grease, but that's got potential.
2. Low heat/long time is arguably better, but I'm often not that patient and use medium heat. It all seems to work.

3. Mirepoix/trinity in the roux for more flavor, IMO.

4. I'm no expert, so I going to have to trust ARFcom on this one: GET BOTH!

Link Posted: 3/27/2009 1:00:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By acegunner:
Originally Posted By zuuk:
roux is for you french wussies

I eat GRAVY; it's the only manly "roux" there is.


You have to make a roux to get gravy...you just add milk...this is called a Bechamel (one of the 5 mother sauces)



sshhhhh... you've given away too much already
Link Posted: 3/27/2009 1:01:33 PM EDT
On a humid summer day all I need is talcum and ball sweat to get a roux going.
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