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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 4/30/2002 1:59:49 AM EDT
I have always wondered in the back of my mind... Would this be a good thing if it happened? Would the the Assault ban still have happened? I know some states/counties/cities have taken CCW to ballot, but what about on a Fed level? What do ya'll think? I myself wonder WHY it hasn't happened yet. On a core constitutional issue like this, isn't it up to the public to decide this once and for all? Or.. are we in the same group that liked New Coke, and we would get trounced... Unfortunately, either way, it is not up to the people to decide. I can see their point though - That's why England banned fire-arms for the most part... look what we did to the goverment then. We didn't like the direction they were going and we ended that. just some musings... and a little ramble... So why don't firearms issues ever go to national ballot?
Link Posted: 4/30/2002 2:36:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/30/2002 2:38:05 AM EDT by 71-Hour_Achmed]
Well, the U.S. experience with them is that they have gone to state ballots -- and some of our states are larger than some European countries. These ballot measures usually get voted down, as happened in California (some sort of handgun restrictions) and Washington state (licensing/registration of handgun owners and all transfers, failed 71%-29%). Every now and then, a limited one gets passed, as happened in Oregon and (IIRC) Colorado for the so-called "gun show loophole" background checks. The media doesn't like to mention the times when gun control lost at the ballot box. They'd rather hype the times when it passed, so that they can make it look popular. As far as federal, there is no provision for that in U.S. law, which is why it won't happen here. And the feds seem to want to keep the fiction that the 2nd Amendment doesn't apply to the states. . . .
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