Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 2/25/2007 4:44:43 PM EST

Link Posted: 2/25/2007 4:46:06 PM EST
looks like it's got a nice patina on it now, throw some grips on and rock it
Link Posted: 2/25/2007 4:47:05 PM EST
I hope your house didn't catch on fire triburst.
Link Posted: 2/25/2007 4:47:10 PM EST
Is that that freakin' .500?

I played with a stainless (Or nickle?) verion of one at my friends shop a couple of weeks ago and all i can say is.......
Link Posted: 2/25/2007 4:47:28 PM EST
I wonder how it would do in a Rockwell hardness test.
Link Posted: 2/25/2007 4:47:50 PM EST
Yeah, that looks pretty neat, actually.
Link Posted: 2/25/2007 4:48:17 PM EST

Originally Posted By Treadhead:
Is that that freakin' .500?


Yep.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:06:28 AM EST

Originally Posted By DnPRK:
I wonder how it would do in a Rockwell hardness test.


I vote for somewhere around dead soft and peanut butter.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:07:55 AM EST
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:09:00 AM EST

Originally Posted By brouhaha:

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

Originally Posted By DnPRK:
I wonder how it would do in a Rockwell hardness test.


I vote for somewhere around dead soft and peanut butter.


I'm not a metallurgist, but wouldn't the fire harden it more?


No need to use logic.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:11:59 AM EST
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:13:36 AM EST

Originally Posted By moparman71:
looks like it's got a nice patina on it now, throw some grips on and rock it


no kidding.

I prefer it now to the SS look.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:14:40 AM EST
send it back to S&W for a replacement
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 8:17:42 AM EST

Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1:

Originally Posted By brouhaha:

Originally Posted By Green_Canoe:

Originally Posted By DnPRK:
I wonder how it would do in a Rockwell hardness test.


I vote for somewhere around dead soft and peanut butter.


I'm not a metallurgist, but wouldn't the fire harden it more?


I'm not a metallurgist either but the conditions of a house fire are the manner in which metal is annealed.


It all depends...

#1 Did it get hot enough to temper it to a lower hardness? Depending on it's original temper this could take as little as 300-400 degrees F to as much as 1000 degrees F.

#2 Did it get hot enough to anneal or harden it? This requires about 1300-1400 degrees F. For annealing the rate of cooling has to be very slow, in the ballpark of 40 degrees lost per hour. This would happen if it got buried in ash and was recovered a few days later. If it got a direct blast of cold water from the hose, enough to cool it from 1400 F to below 200 degrees F very quickly, it could be brittle as glass (i.e. very hard).

I voted for soft since the rapid quench isn't as likely to happen unless the hose is trained on it directly for a minute or so. The rapid quench would also likely not be uniform and therefor warp the gun slightly.

Either way, we all know you don't want to trust your fingers and eyes to a gun that has been in a fire.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 8:20:02 AM EST
You can't bring that on a plane!
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 9:17:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By triburst1:

Originally Posted By Treadhead:
Is that that freakin' .500?


Yep.
Is it yours?

WTH happened man?


On the upside it looks very repairable.
Top Top