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Posted: 12/11/2003 8:38:40 AM EDT
The American Red Cross at Walter Reed Army Medical Center is looking for incidentals/comfort items for sick and wounded Armed Forces Personnel now recuperating at the hospital. When someone is stationed in Iraq, Afghanistan or elsewhere and is wounded or falls ill, they are immediately evacuated, and it can take weeks for their personnel effects to catch up with them. The Red Cross is asking for donations of any of the following:


- Telephone cards of at least 30 minutes
- Rolling luggage (small), totes, carry-ons
- Individually wrapped snacks
- Magazines
- Notepads, pens
- Playing cards and games
- Sweat pants and shirts (all sizes)

All items should be addressed to:
American Red Cross

ATTN: Barbara Green
Walter Reed Army Medical Center
6900 Georgia Ave, N.W.,
Washington, DC 20307-5001.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:47:35 AM EDT
will do, thanks
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 8:58:24 AM EDT
List gathered, packages will go out this week. Thanks for the heads up Paul!
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:04:11 AM EDT
Much appreciated. Tired of reading threads about no 'Christ' in Christmas, our rights being silently ripped away, etc. At least my family and I can help do something worthwile to help and show these guys how much we appreciate them.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:11:03 AM EDT
I'll gladly send anything to help our soldiers out but I won't send it to the Red [s]Cross[/s]Crescent.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:33:57 AM EDT
Done.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:37:30 AM EDT
Like them or not the American Red Cross is the servicemember's best link in times of trouble. They're the ones that we turn to to get us the official notice of a loved one in trouble, who's sick, or even pasted away. They, like the service support groups, will give zero interest loans to help a seamen recuit get back home to his grandfather's wake. They aren't at all political when it comes to helping our men when they need it most.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 9:52:34 AM EDT
Thanks for the heads up. I'll post this on my VFW post's bulletin board tonight.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 10:04:19 AM EDT
I'm on it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 12:21:38 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 2:27:33 PM EDT
I'll put together a package this weekend. Thanks for the info. [usa]
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 4:10:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 5:57:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By CS223: I'll gladly send anything to help our soldiers out but I won't send it to the Red [s]Cross[/s]Crescent.
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You're not sending cash to the Red Cross. The Red Cross is merely acting as a conduit to provide the needed items to our wounded GIs. Can't really see how that could be a problem.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:39:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 7:42:13 PM EDT by 95thFoot]
I have forwarded the info in the first post to all I know. The only question some might have is due to the fact that in the past, the RC have charged GIs for their services, as NAAFI did the British Tommies in WW2. I don't know whether this still goes on, (does it?) but if there's no other aid agency coordinating the efforts to help our GIs, well, the RC's it, then. But here's one reply I got from somebody about it. Again, it's not meant as a slam against the modern RC, but a reminder of how far we have come in the care for our troops, (I hope).
Have two stories to relate to you that you might enjoy. (It's not going to be a 9/11 story... but sort of). When my Dad was in Korea he saw a lot of guys get shot up. Fortunately besides some near misses and an incident with a close call and running into barbed wire, he escaped serious injury. However, he being a squad leader he found out that some of the guys in his squad who were wounded and who he visited later on, or who were lucky (some would say unlucky) to come back to the front, had their pay reduced when they were in hospital. Reason? Reimburse the Red Cross for the blood they provided to them! By the way these same fellows had "donated" blood in the Red Cross blood drives. Story 2. Close friend's grandfather was in France during WWI. Got gassed and crawled off into a pig shed to die. Wakes up sick as a dog, his unit is gone, the farm is abandoned and he has no kit besides what he's wearing. Spends next day or two really sick, then feels well enough to try to get back to the rear. Walks God knows how far, is a terrible mess but sees more and more signs of life and finally comes upon a Red Cross canteen. Hasn't eaten in days and goes right up and takes a doughnut (or several), upon which he is admonished by the Red Cross workers and told that he is a thief and needs to pay for the doughnuts. He hands the uneaten ones back and finally finds a Salvation Army Canteen where they provide the food free of charge. Guess the long point of this is I'll support them if they are the only ones doing anything, but would rather send my money elsewhere to help out.
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Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:40:07 PM EDT
Here's some linkage confirming the request including one from the Red Cross, Defense Link (DoD site), and a US Army site: [url]http://www.redcross.org/press/afes/af_pr/010912tollfree.html[/url] [url]http://www.defenselink.mil/news/Sep2003/n09032003_200309031.html[/url] [url]http://www.ausa.org/PDFdocs/RedCrossflier.pdf[/url] (adobe file) [url]http://www.cinchouse.com/features/waltereed.htm[/url] [url]http://www.alpost206.org/w_reed.htm[/url]
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:43:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 7:50:20 PM EDT by Paul]
I'll do the research on Snopes.com but the Red Cross has ZERO to do with the military's blood supply - at least over the last 23 years I've been in. Frankly I don't see how they could make their way to a MASH unit or other forward deployed MILITARY hosipital and set up a cash and carry business on blood [rolleyes] We do let the Red Cross come on to our bases when the military hosipitals are full up on their supply and suck our blood but in the Navy we're our own "walking blood bank". edited to add: Nothing I could find on Snopes.com so I'll try urbanmyths.com but the posting just smacks of a myth.
Link Posted: 12/11/2003 7:59:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2003 8:04:47 PM EDT by Paul]
Continuing to call Bull Shit on the claim that the Red Cross was selling doughnuts in WWI and blood in WWII to our service members I found this: [b]"One of the biggest misconceptions is that the Red Cross is reimbursed for expenses incurred. Neither the victims, insurance companies or government agencies reimburse the Red Cross. ALL services provided are FREE OF CHARGE and are provided through the voluntary contributions of the American people."[/b] I've e-mailed Snopes.com to investigate this claim that 95thFoot is making and I'm e-mailing the national Red Cross too. Done and done Disclosure: I taught CPR for the Red Cross nearly 20 years ago.
Link Posted: 12/12/2003 6:37:05 AM EDT
With applogies to 95thFoot there is a [b]small[/b] amount of truth to the posting he made above. The Red Cross did charge for doughnuts 60 years ago at it's regular camps as ordered to by the military brass - I don't see how a wounded soldier strugled back though the lines to limp his way back to the Red Cross tent rather than stop at the command post, hosipital, or even chowhall tents. And even it he did I can't see a volunteer demanding payment [lol]. Nothing to support the claim that service members were charged for blood 80 years ago at all with reductions on their pay. The best urban myths always have a bit of truth in them. I'm still doing the research.
Dear Paul: Thank you for contacting the American Red Cross regarding the fees charged for coffee and doughnuts. While it is true that the American Red Cross charged fees for food and lodging at stationary installations during World War II, the fee system was implemented at the request of the U.S. War Department. Excerpts from a May 20, 1942, letter from Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson to the American Red Cross below clearly explains this request. "The Red Cross officials appear to be reluctant to provide these accommodations, except on a basis of no charge to servicemen, unless specifically requested by the Commanding General in that area to provide them at some cost to the recipients .... The War Department appreciates the motive of the Red Cross with respect to this matter and its established policy of free service, but under the circumstances it is believed impractical, unnecessary and undesirable that food and lodging be furnished free ...." In addition, the American Red Cross, contrary to the belief held by many servicemen and civilians, had to pay for most food supplies that it received from the Army, as well as for those obtained from local civilian sources. In April 1946, General Dwight D. Eisenhower, United States Army Chief of Staff, reiterated the policy regarding such charges: "During the current Red Cross fund campaign vast numbers of patriotic Americans have responded generously to the cause. Already the majority of chapters have reached or exceeded their local goals. In some communities, however, I understand the campaign is lagging, and I am surprised to learn that one of the reasons given is that complaints are being leveled at the organization's overseas operation by returning servicemen. For the most part these criticisms have grown out of a Red Cross policy of making nominal charges to our forces for food and lodging in fixed Red Cross installations abroad. These complaints are distressing to me since this particular Red Cross policy was adopted at the request of the Army, so as to insure an equitable distribution among all service personnel of Red Cross resources. I know the Red Cross. I have seen it in action. Overseas it performed with the precision of well-trained army. It would be a grave injustice to the splendid work of the Red Cross if its campaign should be retarded anywhere by mistaken criticisms. In providing millions of pints of life saving blood plasma, thousands upon thousands of packages for prisoners of war, in relaying countless heart-warming messages regarding conditions at home, bringing comfort and entertainment and cheer to hospitals, leave areas and battle fronts, the Red Cross accomplished a prodigious task. In Africa - in England, later on the Continent, we learned how much it meant to find the companionship, the friendliness, the link with home the Red Cross managed to provide. The services of the Red cross are as urgently needed today by our occupation troops, our men in hospitals, and our veterans as they ever were by our fighting forces in time of war. The Red Cross needs and deserves our continued support..." Today's American Red Cross is keeping pace with the changing military. Featuring the latest in computer and telecommunications technology, the American Red Cross Emergency Service Center delivers around-the-clock emergency communication services to active duty military personnel, and to their families. American Red Cross Emergency Services are available to all members of the armed services, and to their families. Both active duty and community-based military can count on the Red Cross to provide emergency communications, emergency financial assistance, counseling, veterans assistance and aid in the field where Red Cross workers are deployed to serve with America's military. Regarding the blood issue, I will have to research that and get back to you.... Sincerely, American Red Cross Inquiry Center
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Link Posted: 12/12/2003 4:47:24 PM EDT
Sent Six 200 min. phone cards out today, marked them "come visit at AR15.COM".
Link Posted: 12/13/2003 8:05:46 PM EDT
if the red cross bothers anyone they can do similar action thru the freedom alliance website. just type in freedom alliance in the search box and you'll find it.
Link Posted: 12/15/2003 9:31:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/15/2003 10:52:22 AM EDT
Just sent out 50lbs of magazines. Mostly cars guns and fishing. My local UPS store gave me a 10% discount on the shipping!
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 4:03:28 PM EDT
My VFW Post is taking collections at the bar for phone cards. Thanks Ladies Auxiliary!
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 4:11:03 PM EDT
Roger that. 25(ish)lbs of magazines going out, I hope those boys like all the Maxims I've gotten with my free subscription. I'll see if the newish package place coffee shop will cut me a deal on shipping.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 4:13:29 PM EDT
On the "Red Cross charges for blood given, even to donors" topic: my blood donor pass (that's BLOOD, not ORGANS, you vultures!) issued by the Red Cross lists the following in German, English, French and Spanish: "Should bearer of this pass ever need blood given and payment is required of him, please send bill to the nearest Red Cross." or something along those lines. I'm quoting from memory here, but will provide a scan, if asked for it.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 4:18:38 PM EDT
Wilco. As long as the Red Cross doesn't ask for money after they stiffed the 9-11 families! It'll be hell or high water before I see them do it to our Whiskey India Alphas.
Link Posted: 12/28/2003 7:38:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Paul: Continuing to call Bull Shit on the claim that the Red Cross was selling doughnuts in WWI and blood in WWII to our service members I found this: [b]"One of the biggest misconceptions is that the Red Cross is reimbursed for expenses incurred. Neither the victims, insurance companies or government agencies reimburse the Red Cross. ALL services provided are FREE OF CHARGE and are provided through the voluntary contributions of the American people."[/b] I've e-mailed Snopes.com to investigate this claim that 95thFoot is making and I'm e-mailing the national Red Cross too. Done and done Disclosure: I taught CPR for the Red Cross nearly 20 years ago.
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My Dad got charged by the Red Cross for paper and pencil to write home to his mother when he was in the hospital, wounded in WWII. He's still alive if you want to call BS on him. FWIW.
Link Posted: 12/29/2003 3:16:30 AM EDT
After what they did to the families of 9-11,I would not give the Red Cross 1 red cent. I would however mail to Walter Reed directly,to make sure our GI's do not get charged a penny. I do not trust the Red Cross. This was posted on another BBS awhile back and most would send to Walter Reed. Just my .02.
Link Posted: 12/29/2003 4:26:40 PM EDT
Ladies and Gentlemen, I understand what you are saying about being skeptical in regards to sending material to the Red Cross; I am a retired Marine Master Sergeant and I fully support any and all efforts to provide for our troops, regardless of Branch of Service. My home is a mere 55 miles or so from the Hospital, I intend on visiting every Friday the troops that are at Walter Reed and Bethesda Navy Hospital. During the Gulf war Part 1, I was wounded and spent nearly 1 ½ years in the hospital. Fully well now by the way. No I am not asking for sympathy, but just letting you know how important our support is, you cannot know how lonely it is when your hurt as bad as some of our best and brightest are feeling alone and so far from home. Strike’s a chord to some that have been there I am sure. Anyway here is my offer to all Arfcom members, anyone that desires for any article to be delivered to Walter Reed or Bethesda in care of our troops let me know. I will deliver it in person and make sure it is received by our troops. Whoever desires this can rest assured it will get to the hospital, I will provide my full information, Name, address and telephone number for all who desire this option of delivery. I will not post it here in a public forum but if you pm me I will respond in kind. The offer has been provided; it is up to you to decide. Semper Fidelis
Link Posted: 12/29/2003 4:53:57 PM EDT
Originally Posted By long-rifle-tactical: Anyway here is my offer to all Arfcom members, anyone that desires for any article to be delivered to Walter Reed or Bethesda in care of our troops let me know. I will deliver it in person and make sure it is received by our troops.
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Check your IM
Link Posted: 12/29/2003 5:17:54 PM EDT
Received and replied.
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