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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 6/5/2003 12:00:39 PM EDT
I've got a 10 mo. old Lab (had him since six weeks). The vet told me to take him off of puppy food and put him on an adult weight control food at 7 1/2 mos because he was already 90 lbs. His reasoning was less hip problems in that breed if kept lean. (So I switched him from IAMS lamb and rice puppy to the lamb and rice adult weight control) Is this dog going to get the proper nutrients at his age? BTW, he has plenty of room to run (and does)
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:11:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/5/2003 12:11:49 PM EDT by ikor]
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:13:20 PM EDT
Id do what the vet said. I had a lab a couple of years ago. He was alittle overwieght most of his life. When he got older (like 9-10) he started to have hip trouble. We had to put him down when he was 13 because he devolped fatty tumours that were interfereing with his breathing and he just couldnt get around anymore. BTW my dog had 10 acres to run on. Labs are great dogs especially with kids and other dogs(we had Sam from when I was 1 till I was 14).
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:16:52 PM EDT
If this dog at ten months is already turning the richer diet of puppy food into fat, then I agree. It is time to change him to a lower protien diet. He should not have any problems adapting to a leaner diet. However, I would feed him regular food and not weight control, as that is going from one extreme to the other. Regular Iams or the equivelent should be fine. Also hip displacia is more common in pure bread animals, and can generaly be diagnosed with an X Ray about the first year of growth.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:28:43 PM EDT
Dont put him on light food yet. Get the reg IAMS first then if ness. Switch him over slowly. when you switch him buy two bags one of the old and one of the new and then slowly keep bring up the mix of the new and cutting back the old. You should be out of the old stuff and feeding him straight new food well before you need to purchase more food. I love puppys He would thank you if he could.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:33:20 PM EDT
Feed the dog raw meat as his basic food and adjust his kibble to his needs. If he is overweight lower kibble and add more controlled exercise. Dogs are carnivores and should eat meat. Processed pet food is shit and should only be used sparingly.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:36:01 PM EDT
I also have a Lab and I beleive we switched over to adult food when he turned one. We were feeding him IAM large breed puppy food and slowy switched him over to IAMS Adult Large breed. He's three and has maintained 85lbs consistantly since then. When we switched him over we did it slowly using 50/50 mix over a couple weeks. He seemed to take to the new food withour any problems.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 12:51:11 PM EDT
Thanks for the info. I think I'll run one more bag of the less active and switch to the regular and see how he does for a while. Both of his parents where over 100 lbs. (young and not fat) and I picked the biggest male of the litter, so, I kind of figured he'd go at least 100 after he lost his puppy fat at about 1 yr or so. My third Lab, btw. He's not as tall as the others I've had so he looks a little chunky, but he's long.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 1:03:59 PM EDT
Just make sure that what your feeding him DOES NOT have BHA and BHT in it. Both these additives are use as preservatives in predominately dry foods. Stay away from these preservatives as they have been linked to liver problems in our four legged friends. Look for dry foods which use Vitamin E as a preservative.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 1:26:04 PM EDT
If you feed him adult food too quick, the meat won't be as tender as you would like and will also be a bit "gamey".
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 1:41:59 PM EDT
Sounds like you are free-feeding your pup. I don't like that practice. Your vets suggestion of switching to a high bulk diet is treating the symptom, not the problem. Or a more common problem is over feeding the pups. A dog's final size is determined by genetics and will not be impacted by forcing a ton of calories on him. Most people carry too much weight on their puppies and grow them too fast. This is unhealthy for growing long bones and joints. It should take 12 to 18 months for them to reach full size. Gunslinger, OFA final test is done after 2 years. Prelim tests can be done earlier but do not get certified. PennHIP can be done earlier but is a fairly new and controversial system. SchH3, good point. It is a little more complicated than that, though. Dogs are incidental omnivores. They consume gut content from their kill and also graze when not trying to induce vomiting. If I had to feed kibble, I would feed Innova. I do have a choice and I wouldn't feed anything to my dogs that I don't eat myself(except green tripe). Only difference is they don't get their food cooked. Look at the stools on your dogs and then compare them to a wild canine's stools. No cheap filler to keep the price down and the bulk up makes a huge difference.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 2:20:01 PM EDT
i have to agree with rileyindy- innova is one of the best store bought foods out there as a vet - this is the food i usually recommend for my clients, and if they are willing i try to get them to try home-cooked food - i am however cautious feeding raw meats - more for the public health significance- i tell people to cook their meat some... there is a great book out there Dr. Pritkarin's Natural Health for Dogs and Cats - has great recipes in there... i cannot stand IAMS, Science Diet, or these other vet-recommened foods - you are paying way too much for alot of crap and fillers, preservatives, and poor quality ingredients in my honest veterinarain opinion! start your pup off right with good nutrition - and do not overvaccinate him - once he's done with his puppy series, next year have them run titers - while not a guarantee that sufficient titers will defend against those diseases (vaccines aint perfect either), i am certain that overvaccination and poor nutrition is the main reason for all the cancer and immune-related diseases i see in general practice... most vets would probably disagree...oh well
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 4:07:18 PM EDT
Good point on the vaccinations, Doc. I recently attended a lecture by Dr. Jean Dodds. Since you sound like an open minded Vet, I would highly recommend sitting in on her if you get the chance. It was quite an eye opener and I will surely be watching the tape when it arrives. We really need more progressive Vets like yourself. Both of my dogs got sick in Montana. I knew the Vet from the previous few days helping preg test her parents cattle. During the vet visit she had the gaul to hand me a nutrition guide published by science diet while poo-pooing my dog's diet. Oh well, the visit and medication was free and it wasn't a food related condition. This thread has officially been hijacked.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 4:28:31 PM EDT
riley, Show me a large breed dog who does not thrive on meat and I will buy you lunch. I fed my dogs raw ground chuck, green tripe, an occassional egg for coat health, and kibble as needed. My dogs are the essence of health and performance. I would not reccomend tripe to a pet owner as the smell will send them running. SchH3 which btw, is short for Schutzhund 3 :)
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 5:15:52 PM EDT
SchH3, Where did you get the idea I said that? I said they are INCIDENTAL omnivores. Any dog will thrive on raw meat; however, that must be balanced with the extra nutrition that is not derived from a strictly carnivorous diet. You're using green tripe and kibble to achieve those ends. I use homemade vegetable puree, eggs w/shell and avocados. Same ends, different means. You ever think about chicken backs/wings/turkey necks? Better calcium content in my opinion than ground beef. Just don't cook them! Hate to see a dog choke on a cooked bird bone. Depending on your location, you can find a RAW co-op that gives you access to inexpensive meats from a bunch of sources. My garage refrigerator freezer still smells like green tripe, from 6 months ago. Bleh!
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 6:00:24 PM EDT
When I go to the buthcer, I see if he has chickens for me. I feed chicken on occassion as a variety of sources is always a good idea. However, my dogs primary food is red meat.
Link Posted: 6/5/2003 7:12:19 PM EDT
Eagle Pak has produced a beautiful, soft, glowing coat on my "middle son".
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 2:49:02 AM EDT
I agree with getting off of IAMS, Science Diet, Purina, Old Roy (bleh!!!!!!). Crystal and I have never seen Innaova here in GA, but we strictly feed our dogs (2 rots) and cats (5, 3 house and 2 feral) a strict diet of nutro. The dogs get approx 2 cups each twice a day, and the cats get about 1 and a half cups tiwce a day (gotta do it to keep Joey our bengal outta the dog food). So far only two cats are overweight (both nutered males). The rotties are doing fine. Argos weighs in at 67 lbs and we think he has some german short hair pointer in him, and Cerberus comes in at 106.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 3:11:26 AM EDT
Nutro Max is good, but Canidae is better. Iams/Eukanuba stinks. Look at the contents: Meal, meaning leftover parts of misc animals. Not good at all.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 4:34:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/6/2003 4:35:07 AM EDT by u-baddog]
Originally Posted By rileyindy: SchH3, Where did you get the idea I said that? I said they are INCIDENTAL omnivores. Any dog will thrive on raw meat; however, that must be balanced with the extra nutrition that is not derived from a strictly carnivorous diet. You're using green tripe and kibble to achieve those ends. I use homemade vegetable puree, eggs w/shell and avocados. Same ends, different means. You ever think about chicken backs/wings/turkey necks? Better calcium content in my opinion than ground beef. Just don't cook them! Hate to see a dog choke on a cooked bird bone. Depending on your location, you can find a RAW co-op that gives you access to inexpensive meats from a bunch of sources. My garage refrigerator freezer still smells like green tripe, from 6 months ago. Bleh!
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Wow, I am dumbfounded at the raw meat thing. I am not against the idea at all. Why can dog eat it and we cant ? Are you guys saying you can feeds raw chicken to your dogs bones and all. What the heck is green tripe. I know what tripe is, green meaning uncooked ? I thought I was feeding them well. [:(]
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 4:43:28 AM EDT
Switch to Nutro Natural Choice for large breeds. It is preserved with vitamin E . The main preservative in the name brands is a known carcinigin.I use Annemet and is quite similar to Nutro. Their stools will be smaller and smell a lot less. I have 3 German Shepherds and less stinky is the way to go.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 4:53:11 AM EDT
I have 4 dogs, and I feed a premium dog food. I also feed 2x a day instead of letting them graze at will. I stay away from Eukenuba, purina and all the other brands. I feed Innova it's pricey but they all do very well with it. All the other dog foods have a bunch of garbage in them. I yet to to see anything nutritious in them. There are also some other really good premium foods out there. Compare labels and you'll see the difference. They are not loaded with preservatives and corn or beet pulp. I like the Innova because when the rep comes in they actually open a bag and try the kibble to make sure it is fresh. They figure it is made with all human grade meats, veggies thatif it is good enough for us then it's good enough for our canine companions. I have seen them send back a shipment to for not being fresh enough.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 6:18:36 AM EDT
dear Waldo, as to K9 diets I am no expert on the subject, however my four large breed dogs (3 boxers 1yr 2yrs and 7yrs and one apbt 9yrs) have done very very very well on home cooked food. The middle boxer, a rescue, has (boxer)colitis, it has been well under control for some time now. We started the puppy out on commercial dog food and she did okay, but after being switched to the home cooked, all of them started looking much more healthy. Their coats are shiny and they have more energy than before. The 7 year old boxer and the 8 yr old APBT were not looking very good and when they first started on the home cooking, but after a month of eating the good stuff they both took a turn for the better. Everyone has their own opinions on the dog food issue, but I personally feel that the home cooking is the best for our dogs. I actually thought my wife was nuts when she started cooking for the dogs, until I saw the results. They are four of the healthiest looking dogs that I have seen. Good luck with your lab.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 12:17:47 PM EDT
Typo in earlier post. Eagle Pack. [url]http://www.eaglepack.com/[/url]
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 12:39:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/6/2003 12:56:22 PM EDT by the1_roadrunner]
Interesting thread... I have a 16week old purebred German Shepherd and here is what I feed her. I agree with an earlier comment that Dogs are carnivores and should not be fed dry kibble alone. I puree the following in a blender and pour over the dry kibble (Professional Breeders Formula) each night. 2 tablespoons Plain Yogurt 1 hard boiled egg, peeled 1 teaspoon cod liver oil 3-4 ounces fresh steamed carrots 1 clove garlic, peeled 3-4 once canned Mackerel 2 tablespoons of a powder made from fishmeal, brewers yeast and kelp you can also add alfalfa sprouts to this recipe. --RR *Edited to mention I sometimes swap cooked Chicken for the Mackerel
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 12:45:55 PM EDT
u-baddog You can eat raw meat. Societal conventions say otherwise. The concern is contracting e. coli or salmonella, etc. I'm not saying those who use kibble are doing bad. We just try to mimic a natural diet for our dogs. If people choose to use kibble, I steer them towards Innova or Canidae. I don't like the preservatives in comercial feed and I don't like the studies that show trace amounts of the same chemical used to put dogs to sleep. For the poo-pooers out there. Most people don't realize that dog food became popular post WWII. Prior to then, everyone make there own dog food. One of my dogs has only had a raw food diet (except when she got in the bowl of good and evil at my friend's house). The other has been raw fed since about 12 weeks. The protein/calcium in this diet is primarily supplied by whole chicken wings/backs. The dogs chew the bones up as they are consuming them. I have no concerns about them having internal damage from the chicken bones. They also dine on ground beef, ostrich meat, emu meat, goat meat, etc. This stuff often comes in human food packaging. Sometimes it is cuttings. Search the net for "BARF dog food" There is alot of info out there. This is not the cheapest or easiest diet. I pick up 80 lbs of chicken at a time and repackage for the freezer. We have to grind all the vegetables once a month and freeze. Here's a webpage my GF put together if you want a little more info [url]http://www.weim.net/riley/raw.htm[/url] One caveat: An adult dog needs to be watched when switching to this diet. Some of them don't know they need to chew the stuff they eat and could choke. Haven't seen it myself. Ahhh yes green tripe. Green tripe is processed like this: 1) Kill cow 2) remove tripe 3) package tripe Human tripe has been washed (and bleached?) to remove all the gut content. The green tripe smells like cow shit. There is a company that cans it which is preferable to having 10lbs of it defrosting in your fridge and stinking the whole world up.
Link Posted: 6/6/2003 12:49:00 PM EDT
DeltaAir, check [url]http://www.naturapet.com/display.php?d=stores-tab[/url] for Innova in your area.
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