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Posted: 7/21/2013 9:02:56 PM EST
I am finishing up a kitchen remodel for my sister's cabin. I'm putting the kitchen cabinet top in. How should I fasten the cabinet top to the cabinet, with glue or with L brackets?

The top "warps" about 1 inch over a 6' span.

If glue: should I just put some heavy weights on the top while it dries or find a way to clamp it down?
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 11:15:07 PM EST
i would do both.
Link Posted: 7/21/2013 11:33:04 PM EST
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Originally Posted By SkeeterTZX:
i would do both.
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A typically Arfcom reaction.

It's about what I'm planning anyway. I'ma gonna hold it down with buckets of sand while glue dries. I was just wondering if there were disadvantages to doing this.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:14:13 AM EST
What kind of counter top?

Carcass should have braces on the top you can screw through to hold the top in place.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 3:25:12 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Covertness:
What kind of counter top?

Carcass should have braces on the top you can screw through to hold the top in place.
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LOL 'carcass'

Do not use glue if there's a snowball's chance in hell the top will be replaced in your lifetime. Screw down is the better solution.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 5:40:02 AM EST
An inch over 6' is a lot. Are the cabinets not level or is the top actually warped?
Shim it and screw it. I wouldn't glue it.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 5:57:08 AM EST
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Originally Posted By heavily_armed:


LOL 'carcass'

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Originally Posted By heavily_armed:
Originally Posted By Covertness:
What kind of counter top?

Carcass should have braces on the top you can screw through to hold the top in place.


LOL 'carcass'



A cabinet minus the doors and drawers is called a carcass.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 6:26:41 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Covertness:
A cabinet minus the doors and drawers is called a carcass.
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It can also be called the "case".
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 7:38:44 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Covertness:


A cabinet minus the doors and drawers is called a carcass.
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Originally Posted By Covertness:
Originally Posted By heavily_armed:
Originally Posted By Covertness:
What kind of counter top?

Carcass should have braces on the top you can screw through to hold the top in place.


LOL 'carcass'



A cabinet minus the doors and drawers is called a carcass.


No shit? Thought it was spellcheck gone wrong.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 9:59:39 AM EST
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Originally Posted By veritas_rasa:
An inch over 6' is a lot. Are the cabinets not level or is the top actually warped?
Shim it and screw it. I wouldn't glue it.
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I agree. An inch of deflection is a lot. Something could be wrong. I'd look into it before I tried to force it down to the surface of the cabinet. Over time, this could lead to a split in the top.
Link Posted: 7/22/2013 8:57:58 PM EST
The top is warped. I spent beaucoup time leveling the carcase.
Link Posted: 7/23/2013 2:38:46 AM EST
so its wood then?

then you need to mount with cleats or clips as it will expand and contract
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 8:35:57 AM EST
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Originally Posted By Orion_Shall_Rise:
so its wood then?

then you need to mount with cleats or clips as it will expand and contract
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Pressboard, actually. The top is formica on pressboard; the bottom is pressboard with a wood-like laminate.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 1:40:45 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:



Pressboard, actually. The top is formica on pressboard; the bottom is pressboard with a wood-like laminate.
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By Orion_Shall_Rise:
so its wood then?

then you need to mount with cleats or clips as it will expand and contract



Pressboard, actually. The top is formica on pressboard; the bottom is pressboard with a wood-like laminate.



"Pressboard" as in particle board? If so, use clips, it should not take a lot of force to flatten it out. If it's easy to bend down, it should not crack. If it's hard to get it to go down, something is wrong. The Formica on one surface only makes it an asymmetrical stack and it's bound to warp a bit.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 5:17:32 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Trollslayer:



"Pressboard" as in particle board? If so, use clips, it should not take a lot of force to flatten it out. If it's easy to bend down, it should not crack. If it's hard to get it to go down, something is wrong. The Formica on one surface only makes it an asymmetrical stack and it's bound to warp a bit.
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Originally Posted By Trollslayer:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By Orion_Shall_Rise:
so its wood then?

then you need to mount with cleats or clips as it will expand and contract



Pressboard, actually. The top is formica on pressboard; the bottom is pressboard with a wood-like laminate.



"Pressboard" as in particle board? If so, use clips, it should not take a lot of force to flatten it out. If it's easy to bend down, it should not crack. If it's hard to get it to go down, something is wrong. The Formica on one surface only makes it an asymmetrical stack and it's bound to warp a bit.



It's not too hard to press down. What kind of clips do you suggest? I was using some L-brackets.
Link Posted: 7/24/2013 8:27:51 PM EST
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Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
What kind of clips do you suggest? I was using some L-brackets.
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"Clips",... "L-brackets",...sounds like the same thing, to me.
Link Posted: 7/25/2013 8:44:11 AM EST
Remember a wide piece of wood (of ANY type) is going to move with humidity (water content).

NOTHING will stop it from moving.

Not glue, not screws, nor nails.

You must allow for the movement or it WILL tear it self apart.


Link Posted: 7/25/2013 10:03:32 AM EST
He's using particle board.

An L-bracket with either undersized screws or oversized holes, attached firmly but not with a death grip, will allow enough expansion.

I've seen slots milled into the cabinet sides. I've also seen oval holes in the clips. There are so many options out there.
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