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Posted: 4/10/2017 5:08:59 PM EDT
I was just rummaging through some tools and hardware someone gave me recently and found a box of slotted nuts which I couldn't identify. After examining them for a few minutes, I still couldn't figure out what the slots were for. I wondered if there was some kind of spline tool that would tighten them if they were recessed, but then why bother with the flat sides? Anyhow, I decided to look them up and learned that I have what are called castellated nuts (not like an AR15 castle nut).

They looked like this:


Apparently, they're pretty good at holding things together when used in conjunction with cotter pins and the like. This article I came across shed some light on myths about lock split washers, facts about static loads and other aspects of putting (and keeping) things together.
Fastenating article about nuts and bolts
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:17:34 PM EDT
Used on ball joints, tie rods etc.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:18:39 PM EDT
Don't you mean fascinating article about fasteners?
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:19:10 PM EDT
Belleville washers should absolutely fascinate you then!
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:21:07 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Don't you mean fascinating article about fasteners?
View Quote
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:21:23 PM EDT
Don't you Castle Nut, bro?
Used along with a hole in the bolt and a cotter pin to keep it from vibratung off.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:23:18 PM EDT
Quoted:
I was just rummaging through some tools and hardware someone gave me recently and found a box of slotted nuts which I couldn't identify. After examining them for a few minutes, I still couldn't figure out what the slots were for. I wondered if there was some kind of spline tool that would tighten them if they were recessed, but then why bother with the flat sides? Anyhow, I decided to look them up and learned that I have what are called castellated nuts (not like an AR15 castle nut).

They looked like this:
http://www.toolandanchor.com/catalog/categories/2FNCASTLE.jpg

Apparently, they're pretty good at holding things together when used in conjunction with cotter pins and the like. This article I came across shed some light on myths about lock split washers, facts about static loads and other aspects of putting (and keeping) things together.
Fastenating article about nuts and bolts
View Quote





That's interesting!!


Have you heard we put a man on the moon???
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:23:58 PM EDT
good article but nothing "NEW"
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:24:15 PM EDT
Common on older motorcycle axle nuts, too.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:25:17 PM EDT
How does a grown man not know this?
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:25:49 PM EDT
I think you misspelled 'fascinate'.

You did ,however,inadvertently remind me of a "little Johnny" joke..........
The teacher asked little Johnny to use ' fascinate' in a sentence....Johnny thought and thought and finally said very proudly "My sister's sweater has10 buttons.....but her tits are so big she can only fasten eight"
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:25:57 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Belleville washers should absolutely fascinate you then!
View Quote
belleville washers are the shit!



Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:26:03 PM EDT
Wat,
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:26:07 PM EDT
Double tapped my phone...
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:27:41 PM EDT
You would probably lose it if you found a pair of safety wire pliers
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:28:05 PM EDT
Those things are on trailer spindles and airplanes, neat stuff.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:28:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
How does a grown man not know this?
View Quote
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:28:36 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
You would probably lose it if you found a pair of safety wire pliers
View Quote
Mindblown.gif
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:30:20 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I think you misspelled 'fascinate'.

You did ,however,inadvertently remind me of a "little Johnny" joke..........
The teacher asked little Johnny to use ' fascinate' in a sentence....Johnny thought and thought and finally said very proudly "My sister's sweater has10 buttons.....but her tits are so big she can only fasten eight"
View Quote
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:34:45 PM EDT
Good on searching out personal knowledge.  There are soooo many types of fasteners and methods out there and some can get real interesting.

One of my personally favorite methods of using a nut and bolt is bolt tensioning...  You put the bolt through and then a machine stretches it and you hand tighten the nut.  when the machine lets go... boom, it aint going nowhere.

It is used for larger bolts where getting the proper torque needed is not feasible using a standard tightening method.

SKF Hydraulic Bolt Tensioner HTA.wmv
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:34:49 PM EDT
Quoted:
I was just rummaging through some tools and hardware someone gave me recently and found a box of slotted nuts which I couldn't identify. After examining them for a few minutes, I still couldn't figure out what the slots were for. I wondered if there was some kind of spline tool that would tighten them if they were recessed, but then why bother with the flat sides? Anyhow, I decided to look them up and learned that I have what are called castellated nuts (not like an AR15 castle nut).

They looked like this:
http://www.toolandanchor.com/catalog/categories/2FNCASTLE.jpg

Apparently, they're pretty good at holding things together when used in conjunction with cotter pins and the like. This article I came across shed some light on myths about lock split washers, facts about static loads and other aspects of putting (and keeping) things together.
Fastenating article about nuts and bolts
View Quote


So........you have never replaced a ball joint or tie rod end?
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:35:54 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Belleville washers should absolutely fascinate you then!
View Quote


Schnorrs would blow his mind.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:37:13 PM EDT
I seem to remember one of those on my jeeps front driveshaft
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:37:38 PM EDT
cool 

castle nutz


Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:38:38 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I think you misspelled 'fascinate'.

You did ,however,inadvertently remind me of a "little Johnny" joke..........
The teacher asked little Johnny to use ' fascinate' in a sentence....Johnny thought and thought and finally said very proudly "My sister's sweater has10 buttons.....but her tits are so big she can only fasten eight"
View Quote
Little Johnny delivers the laughs.

I was going to title the link: "Ten Secrets About Screwing That Drive Engineers Nuts", but I figured it'd be dismissed as clickbait.
Anyhow, I'll gladly take all the jabs for my attempt at creative spelling.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:42:40 PM EDT
I found out about castle nuts around the mid-2000's when I replaced a tie rod on a Honda Civic. Also found out how to use a tie rod separator tool at the same time.

I used a ball joint tool to pop it out.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:43:41 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I seem to remember one of those on my jeeps front driveshaft
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Not common on driveshafts but they are common on CV axles and on almost all non driven wheel bearings weather car, truck or trailer..
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:53:36 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Now THAT'S just crazy!! There is a set of pliers just like this mixed in with all the stuff. There's also about 20 pounds of Swagelok fittings, several Starrett calipers and micrometers, thread gauges, a Gerber Scientific variable scale, and lots of wrapped or boxed items I haven't even opened yet.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:54:25 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:56:15 PM EDT
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Quoted:
I found out about castle nuts around the mid-2000's when I replaced a tie rod on a Honda Civic. Also found out how to use a tie rod separator tool at the same time.

I used a ball joint tool to pop it out.
http://revbeergoggles.com/balljoint1/ball-joint-tool.jpg
View Quote
Real men use pickle forks and sledge hammers.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:56:16 PM EDT
Quoted:
I was just rummaging through some tools and hardware someone gave me recently and found a box of slotted nuts which I couldn't identify. After examining them for a few minutes, I still couldn't figure out what the slots were for. I wondered if there was some kind of spline tool that would tighten them if they were recessed, but then why bother with the flat sides? Anyhow, I decided to look them up and learned that I have what are called castellated nuts (not like an AR15 castle nut).

They looked like this:
http://www.toolandanchor.com/catalog/categories/2FNCASTLE.jpg

Apparently, they're pretty good at holding things together when used in conjunction with cotter pins and the like. This article I came across shed some light on myths about lock split washers, facts about static loads and other aspects of putting (and keeping) things together.
Fastenating article about nuts and bolts
View Quote


do you know how I know you do not work on automobiles?
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:58:12 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


I was toying with the idea of using those in my form 1 can as a way to keep the baffle stack tight. Kinda hard to find them in the size I would've needed without ordering like 100 of them.
View Quote
You could try some place like Fastenall.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 5:59:01 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Schnorrs would blow his mind.
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Quoted:
Quoted:
Belleville washers should absolutely fascinate you then!
Schnorrs would blow his mind.
I've used spring washers before, but ..



..boom
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:03:01 PM EDT
Trailer hubs, motorcycles, farming equipment, steering/suspension systems
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:06:50 PM EDT
Bellvilles are neat! you can stack them face to face and get more movement with the same spring force. Or you can stack them parallel and get the same movement with greater force. Or mix and match.

Not sure they'd be good in a can though because once they got hot they'd soften and lose tension.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:08:50 PM EDT
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But, but, but... why does the thingie on the back twist out and spin back in?!?!
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:10:40 PM EDT
Just came by to say the thread title made me lol.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:11:02 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Belleville washers should absolutely fascinate you then!
View Quote
I had to replace the clutch in my International tractor.It had 2 (large)
Belleville washers rather than a conventional pressure plate.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:11:15 PM EDT
Look at the Aircraft Spruce catalog . You will have a field day
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:19:06 PM EDT
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Quoted:
How does a grown man not know this?
View Quote
This.

What kind of sheltered life does one lead that prevents them from acquiring such basic knowledge.

A flange crimp nut would blow your mind!
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:20:39 PM EDT
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Quoted:

Real men use pickle forks and sledge hammers.
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No, real men simply use 2 large hammers sans the fork
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:22:34 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:24:31 PM EDT
wait till OP discovers a Chicago screw and Frankenstein Bolts.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:25:11 PM EDT
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Quoted:
But, but, but... why does the thingie on the back twist out and spin back in?!?!
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View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
But, but, but... why does the thingie on the back twist out and spin back in?!?!
Having never seen (or at least noticed) such a tool until I held one in my hands today, I asked myself a very similar question. I went and looked that up too. Pretty neat gadget.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:26:30 PM EDT
Nord Lock washers FTMFW!
Nord locks are all I use on my suppressors.
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:28:12 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Look at the Aircraft Spruce catalog . You will have a field day
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AS is a great resource!
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:29:00 PM EDT
This thread is nuts
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:33:00 PM EDT
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Quoted:
This thread is nuts Supernuts!
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Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:36:33 PM EDT
Looks like someone here has never done a drum brake job before....
Link Posted: 4/10/2017 6:37:26 PM EDT
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Quoted:
Don't you Castle Nut, bro?
Used along with a hole in the bolt and a cotter pin to keep it from vibratung off.
View Quote
Kinda....

The cotter pin is there most of the time as a safety feature more than anything (or safety wire in some applications).   You still need to properly torque the nut to being with to have the proper preload in the joint.  And if you do that right the nut shouldn't back off.  Just putting the nut on loosely and then slamming home a cotter pin will usually result in bad things happening.   That is why ball joints and tie rods have the hole in the threads drilled so that the only way to get the pin in place is if the nut is tight enough.

But as you said, vibration and rotation of the joint itself can cause it to want to lose tension, and the pin is there to help keep it from working itself even more loose to the point of coming off all together.    Yes, there are some light use cases where the cotter pin really does help hold the nut on, but those are usually in things like lawn and garden equipment, etc.   Heck, some things now don't even use the nut.  They just use a big flat washer and a large cotter pin through the shaft to hold things in place.  That's a cheap way out of using a circlip...


Sorry, can't help myself.  I deal with some goofy stuff at work and sometimes people think things like keys and keyways, or things like cotter pins are the main way to transmit load in a bolted joint, when really they are primarily for alignment, and have a secondary use to help carry load if something else goes wrong.
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