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Posted: 4/27/2014 12:11:52 PM EDT
Last year I bought 7 acres next door to me and originally thought I'd fence it as pasture for our 4 horses.  With the help of our hay seller we instead planted a really nice hay mix and it looks like it will be fantastic this year and no way way I can justify putting the horses on it. (we got 16 tons on the first cut last year on a very late planting and sold it all).

The thing is, we've been buying hay but all of our suppliers are out of everything but their crap that nobody wanted from last year.  And the price keeps going up.  We had to pay $8/bale today for some decent hay from last year, but now we have our own field that can easily keep ours fed all year long with still plenty to sell and I have friends with the equipment and time to do so (while they get a cut too) but I need to build a storage facility for it (I have some room but not enough now) and need ideas on what is a good long lasting but not fancy structure I could build without breaking the bank?  I've been looking at these poly buildings from Farmtek  they seem priced pretty well but I don't know how long something like that holds up?

I am open to any ideas you might suggest.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:18:42 PM EDT
A hoop building should fit the need. Google: hoop building
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:19:43 PM EDT


Pole barn

Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:21:08 PM EDT
Pole barn


Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:22:38 PM EDT
Pre engineered steel buildings?

Everybody I know uses gutted turkey barns.
I take it you are square baling am I right?
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:23:34 PM EDT
Why not a tarped hay stack?
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:26:00 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 12:30:48 PM EDT by sniper1target]
pre sell it   ... cut  ,wind row it, bail it , let the buyer load it
cash in pocket...
no storage

http://www.hayexchange.com/oh.php


i have seen
8.00 to 16.00 per acre to cut  (your 7 = 56.00/112.00)
and as LOW as
.50 cents  per bail to bail it. your tonnage at 50# bails = 600 or more =300 bucks.
600 x
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 12:59:56 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 1:01:43 PM EDT by gomulego]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By cpl_fisher:
Pre engineered steel buildings?

Everybody I know uses gutted turkey barns.
I take it you are square baling am I right?
View Quote


Yes, we use mostly small squares (because they are easy to handle inside the stable) but we use rounds outside in the feedlot. So it would be a mix of both. Last year though we had a buyer from TX  that bought it all because it was oat hay to begin with (cattle feed lot) that wanted big squares that can only be handled by machines.  

We have a lot of wild turkeys nearby but I don't know of anyone around that raises them so I don't really know what a turkey barn is.


Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:08:38 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Why not a tarped hay stack?
View Quote

That's my suggestion as well.

Unless you plan on putting up hay for the rest of your life, that building might not pay for itself. Tarps are reuasable and you don't have to have the stack in the same spot all the time.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:17:39 PM EDT
pole barn



generally, hay storage easily pays for itself from what I have read.  Exposed hay can degrade 25-40%.




found this, hope it helps.




Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:19:36 PM EDT
Pole Barn
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:29:30 PM EDT
I built my 2 bay 26' x 72' pole barn using used 4.5" oil well pipe for poles.  Then I bought rough cut lumber for the roof trusses and laid sheet metal on top.  Easy and cheap.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:36:35 PM EDT
Hoop barn.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:41:40 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
pole barn

generally, hay storage easily pays for itself from what I have read.  Exposed hay can degrade 25-40%.

found this, hope it helps.

http://farmprogress.com/library.aspx/tool-tallies-hay-storage-costs-33/34/673

View Quote


Dang man! that is exactly the kind of thing I was looking for. Thank you!
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:50:22 PM EDT
If I were in your shoes, I might consider planning to pour a floor slab first, and building a shed over it at a later date, (if you can't afford both at the same time.) A lot of field stacks rot from the bottom up, and the base is often the most square footage of area in the entire stack.
Get the hay off the wet ground and cover with a good tarp.
 A flat and level floor goes a long way toward a tight, neat stack and makes stacking and unstacking easier.

Obviously you should plan the pour for foundation footers, approach aprons, under-floor future plumbing and electrical issues for a multi-purpose or whatever you envision as needed in the future.

Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:51:34 PM EDT
check out a steel quonset buildings very easy to build.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:51:55 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Chromekilla:
Why not a tarped hay stack?
View Quote

IF he is cutting square bales for horses, probably  a bad idea.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 1:55:28 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gomulego:


Yes, we use mostly small squares (because they are easy to handle inside the stable) but we use rounds outside in the feedlot. So it would be a mix of both. Last year though we had a buyer from TX  that bought it all because it was oat hay to begin with (cattle feed lot) that wanted big squares that can only be handled by machines.  

We have a lot of wild turkeys nearby but I don't know of anyone around that raises them so I don't really know what a turkey barn is.

http://imageshack.com/a/img10/5658/9dr2.jpg
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Originally Posted By gomulego:
Originally Posted By cpl_fisher:
Pre engineered steel buildings?

Everybody I know uses gutted turkey barns.
I take it you are square baling am I right?


Yes, we use mostly small squares (because they are easy to handle inside the stable) but we use rounds outside in the feedlot. So it would be a mix of both. Last year though we had a buyer from TX  that bought it all because it was oat hay to begin with (cattle feed lot) that wanted big squares that can only be handled by machines.  

We have a lot of wild turkeys nearby but I don't know of anyone around that raises them so I don't really know what a turkey barn is.

http://imageshack.com/a/img10/5658/9dr2.jpg


It is a big metal shed once it is gutted. That is probably your best bet, a pre engineered metal building. You will need to keep it off the dirt as well. Pallets work well for this. IIRC you can get one built for around 10k... will take a few years to pay off but nobody will buy horse hay that has been out in the weather. Just throwing tarps over the hay will get a lot of mold in it if the ground is moist underneath.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 2:12:00 PM EDT
I've got one of these.  It was around $7000 at the time and holds about 250-300 4x5 rolls.  Been up ten years and still looks lie the day it was put up. http://kyhoopbarns.com
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 2:12:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 2:13:50 PM EDT by waterglass]
If you got locust trees, and post hole digger just sink two rows of posts 16" feet apart and 12' to 14' tall and make it as long as you need. Use to tin for the roof and walls.  Leave the front open. Wall the side faceing prevailing winds.

You should be able to fit two rows of bails stacked two deep in such a building.

A 16' wide 12 foot tall,  40 foot building should hold about 35 5 foot bails.

Probably cost 1200.00 to 1500.00 to do.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 2:17:34 PM EDT
hoop barn
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 3:20:51 PM EDT
Most farmers around here just plastic wrap it and leave it in the field.





Link Posted: 4/27/2014 3:24:15 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 3:43:48 PM EDT
I would build a pole barn. Build as big as you can because you will find something to fill it up with. Selling $8/bale hay will help pay for it.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:01:18 PM EDT
I'd build a pole barn with concrete floor.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:06:49 PM EDT
We use a pole barn, dirt floor and get some used pallets to put it on.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:25:37 PM EDT
Any local amish barn builders? We had them build our storage barn. Good barn. Good price.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:35:42 PM EDT
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:38:44 PM EDT
Damn

Around here I see rolls rotting from last year (and beyond)

I'm going w/ pole barn OP.

Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:40:10 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.
View Quote


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.


Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:46:04 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By redfish86:


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.


View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By redfish86:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.




There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:51:13 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By kentucky_smith:
I've got one of these.  It was around $7000 at the time and holds about 250-300 4x5 rolls.  Been up ten years and still looks lie the day it was put up. http://kyhoopbarns.com
View Quote


Something like that is what I've been looking at and just needed to know if they really held up.  You probably just sold me.

I do have a large steel building (60X100) where we currently store our hay but it is also a shop and guest house (a really nice guest house) and also where the horses are stabled. But the hay field is gong to produce a lot more than we can take in there at one time.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:54:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 4:57:02 PM EDT by jchewie1]
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.
View Quote




Where is the "like" button?  If you can't pay off the storage building pretty quick from income from selling the hay on your pasture, just build a small shed for whatever you need to get through the winter and have your buddy bale just what you need.

Consider how long you will be living there and have as many horses as you do.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 4:56:23 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:


There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By redfish86:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.




There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.


This. But typically buying a horse is a very poor financial decision.

The best way to follow up a poor decision is with more poor decisions.

It's damn near impossible to make money off of a small time deal like that, if you go buying a bunch of things. I work in the dairy business and just got back into beef cattle on the side because I inherited some land and bought some with my house. Even being able to raise 120 or so head of cattle I don't think i'll make any significant money. Small scale ag is a money losing son of a bitch.

And Stutz cattle has been around this stuff a bit, I'd listen to him.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:02:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 5:14:01 PM EDT by waterglass]
How much hay can an acre field produce in a year? surely no more than 15 bails at tippy top production. And you'ed need what, 6 or 8 per horse in the winter? If you want to make some money use half the ground you dont need to feed horses for corn, buy a grinder mixer and go into the egg and pig business. Run a few steers on the rest.

Atleast then you would save some money on food cost.


Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:06:40 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.
View Quote



I never understand them, but we sell a shit load of Alfalfa hay to them.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:10:21 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:


There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By redfish86:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.




There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.


hay is strickly a side venture. I've been in the farm/ranching business most of my life. Stutz knows what he is talking about. Hay business is just extra green, you already have all the gear and barns. when you have to build or buy, its a no go. we farm about 500 acres of Alfalfa. it does well.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:11:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 5:12:41 PM EDT by OKnativeson]
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Originally Posted By jchewie1:




Where is the "like" button?  If you can't pay off the storage building pretty quick from income from selling the hay on your pasture, just build a small shed for whatever you need to get through the winter and have your buddy bale just what you need.

Consider how long you will be living there and have as many horses as you do.
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Originally Posted By jchewie1:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.




Where is the "like" button?  If you can't pay off the storage building pretty quick from income from selling the hay on your pasture, just build a small shed for whatever you need to get through the winter and have your buddy bale just what you need.

Consider how long you will be living there and have as many horses as you do.

you should never store hay for someone else. its their game. you bale... they load and take home or deliver it for a fee.

Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:13:24 PM EDT
OP set aside enough of the land to pasture the horses on. I take it you all ready have storage space enough for you winter needs? If so just build a good client base, if the hay is as good you say you wont have an issue and sell the bales right off the rack. No reason to waste time stacking and storage for such a small acreage amount.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:16:43 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By ACDer:
Any local amish barn builders? We had them build our storage barn. Good barn. Good price.
View Quote


Yes interestingly enough I live near Holmes county. Home of a very large population of Amish. You've probably seen them featured on a show called Amish Mafia where they are pitted against their Pennsylvania brethren (that is all bullshit btw). And I hired a crew of young Amish guys that were actually also featured on a documentary that 20-20 did called The Outsiders about what it is like to go through Rumspringa for the Amish.  That is where the Amish kids (of age) get to make the choice to either remain Amish or go English and forever lose all contact with their community and family. Now that is a tough choice.

But these guys built me a complete barn in 4 days and did a good job and I'm thinking about hiring them again.  They just have the work ethic and skills to do it.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:21:14 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Fella:


This. But typically buying a horse is a very poor financial decision.

The best way to follow up a poor decision is with more poor decisions.

It's damn near impossible to make money off of a small time deal like that, if you go buying a bunch of things. I work in the dairy business and just got back into beef cattle on the side because I inherited some land and bought some with my house. Even being able to raise 120 or so head of cattle I don't think i'll make any significant money. Small scale ag is a money losing son of a bitch.

And Stutz cattle has been around this stuff a bit, I'd listen to him.
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Originally Posted By Fella:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By redfish86:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.




There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.


This. But typically buying a horse is a very poor financial decision.

The best way to follow up a poor decision is with more poor decisions.

It's damn near impossible to make money off of a small time deal like that, if you go buying a bunch of things. I work in the dairy business and just got back into beef cattle on the side because I inherited some land and bought some with my house. Even being able to raise 120 or so head of cattle I don't think i'll make any significant money. Small scale ag is a money losing son of a bitch.

And Stutz cattle has been around this stuff a bit, I'd listen to him.



Look guys. I'm not trying to make money from this.  I'm not in it for that. Only a rare few can even do that with horses but I am not that guy.

I just asked about an economical building for storing hay?
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:22:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 5:27:49 PM EDT by waterglass]
If you have to put more than 4K into it, I wouldnt do it.

A good rule of thumb is if half the profits wont pay it off in three yearsor less it aint worth it.

Economic building to store hay?

Pole barn with tin siding.

Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:24:17 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By gomulego:



Look guys. I'm not trying to make money from this.  I'm not in it for that. Only a rare few can even do that with horses but I am not that guy.

I just asked about an economical building for storing hay?
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Originally Posted By gomulego:
Originally Posted By Fella:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By redfish86:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Let me get this straight....

You're going to lock your horses up, keep them off the pasture, go out and spend money to cut the grass they were going to eat, rake the grass they were going to eat for free, bale the grass the grass they were going to eat for free, haul the grass from where they were going to eat it for free into a building you are going to have to pay for and all of this is because the grass they were going to eat for free looks too pretty and you should spend a bunch of money so they can eat for free what you've just spent a shitload of money on?

Seems logical.......


Horse people.


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.




There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.


This. But typically buying a horse is a very poor financial decision.

The best way to follow up a poor decision is with more poor decisions.

It's damn near impossible to make money off of a small time deal like that, if you go buying a bunch of things. I work in the dairy business and just got back into beef cattle on the side because I inherited some land and bought some with my house. Even being able to raise 120 or so head of cattle I don't think i'll make any significant money. Small scale ag is a money losing son of a bitch.

And Stutz cattle has been around this stuff a bit, I'd listen to him.



Look guys. I'm not trying to make money from this.  I'm not in it for that. Only a rare few can even do that with horses but I am not that guy.

I just asked about an economical building for storing hay?


In that case, build a pole barn.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:31:29 PM EDT
What part of Ohio is going $8?  I have had people stopping buy several times trying to sell me good hay from last year for cheap just clear out space for this year.  If you want more storage, I would just go for a pole barn.  They can be done fairly cheap and later when the hay market is more normal, you can always use it for cars, tractors, trucks, etc.  

Link Posted: 4/27/2014 5:40:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/27/2014 5:42:40 PM EDT by redfish86]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:



Look guys. I'm not trying to make money from this.  I'm not in it for that. Only a rare few can even do that with horses but I am not that guy.

I just asked about an economical building for storing hay?
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By gomulego:
Originally Posted By Fella:
Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By redfish86:


Did you miss the part where he sells the surplus?

It's "wicked" obvious.




There's no money in the "small time" hay business.  Especially if you plan on putting up a building.  You can't plan on generating record profits like the last couple years for the hay business.  Most of the time horse hay around here sells for $4.  That doesn't pay the bills.  I have a little experience with this.  I'm "wicked" smart.


This. But typically buying a horse is a very poor financial decision.

The best way to follow up a poor decision is with more poor decisions.

It's damn near impossible to make money off of a small time deal like that, if you go buying a bunch of things. I work in the dairy business and just got back into beef cattle on the side because I inherited some land and bought some with my house. Even being able to raise 120 or so head of cattle I don't think i'll make any significant money. Small scale ag is a money losing son of a bitch.

And Stutz cattle has been around this stuff a bit, I'd listen to him.



Look guys. I'm not trying to make money from this.  I'm not in it for that. Only a rare few can even do that with horses but I am not that guy.

I just asked about an economical building for storing hay?


In that case, build a pole barn.
Excuse me while I chuckle.
Link Posted: 4/27/2014 6:58:50 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Dan12:
What part of Ohio is going $8?  I have had people stopping buy several times trying to sell me good hay from last year for cheap just clear out space for this year.  If you want more storage, I would just go for a pole barn.  They can be done fairly cheap and later when the hay market is more normal, you can always use it for cars, tractors, trucks, etc.  

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Central Ohio. Can you give me the names of these people?
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