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Posted: 8/29/2004 2:11:33 AM EST
Navy jet rolls into S.D. Bay on landing



By David E. Graham
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER
August 27, 2004

A Navy fighter jet lay in San Diego Bay after missing its landing last night at North Island Naval Air Station. The pilot ejected before the jet hit the water.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Raise the 'Lucky'
CORONADO – Efforts will begin this afternoon to recover a $40 million F/A-18C Hornet jet that crashed into San Diego Bay while landing at the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado, base officials said.

The Navy pilot managed to eject before the plane crashed into the water around 8:40 p.m. yesterday, and he was not injured, Navy and Coast guard officials said.

The plane, which is mostly still in one piece, will be lifted onto a barge later today, according to Steve Fiebing, a base spokesman.

"Preparations are under way right now to get the plane out of the water," Fiebing said late this morning. "A small amount of fuel leaked from the plane, but it is being contained at this time. There were no major fuel spills."

It was unclear why the jet overshot the runway last night, Fiebing said. The pilot told rescuers that the plane's brakes failed.

The runway typically used by Navy pilots was closed and the pilot was landing on an unfamiliar runway, a Navy spokesman told KNX radio in Los Angeles.

The cause of the crash is under investigation, Fiebing said.

The shaken pilot was not injured, but he was taken to San Diego Naval Medical Center for examination and was in good condition, Coast Guard officials said. His name was not immediately released.

The plane, belonging to Strike Fighter Squadron 151 attached to the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, had flown from the ship to North Island, Navy officials said.

A Navy fighter jet ended up in San Diego Bay last night after it ran out of runway while landing at North Island Naval Air Station.

The lone pilot ejected before the plane hit the water, and he ended up in the bay and was pulled from the water, officials said. The pilot, apparently uninjured, told rescuers his brakes failed.

The plane, an F/A-18C Hornet from a carrier off the coast, was partially submerged in the bay last night.

"The pilot was unable to stop the aircraft and ended up just beyond the runway," said Cmdr. Ed Buclatin, a spokesman for Naval Air Forces.

He was taken to San Diego Naval Medical Center, where he seemed in good condition, Buclatin said.

The nickname "Lucky" was painted on the side of the plane by the cockpit.

U.S. Coast Guard and San Diego Harbor Police helped rescue the pilot.

The plane, in Strike Fighter Squadron 151 with the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, had flown from the ship to North Island, Buclatin said.

The Lincoln is now off the coast. Buclatin said he did not know why the Hornet had come to North Island.

In March, two military planes crashed in the county.

On March 10, a Marine UC-35D Cessna jet went down at Miramar Marine Air Station when it was trying to land. Four Marines died.

On March 29, a Navy F-14 Tomcat, from Oceana Naval Air Station, Va., crashed into the sea about two miles off Point Loma, after it reportedly developed engine problems. The two-man crew ejected safely and two Navy contract employees in a nearby boat rescued them.














Navy jet hauled out of bay

SIGNONSANDIEGO NEWS SERVICES
9:30 p.m. August 27, 2004

SignOnSanDiego

A $40 million F/A-18C Hornet jet that crashed into San Diego Bay while landing at the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado was hauled out of the water Friday night, an official said.

CORONADO – A $40 million F/A-18C Hornet jet that crashed into San Diego Bay while landing at the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado was hauled out of the water Friday night, an official said.

The plane was hauled onto a barge by a crane and will be taken to a Navy pier, put on a tractor trailer and taken to a hangar, said Steve Fiebing, public affairs officer at the Naval Base Coronado.

"The aircraft appears to look in pretty good shape," Fiebing said.

Whether it will ever fly again "depends on the structural damage," Fiebing said.

Planes that crash into salt water can be cleaned up, but there was also damage when the pilot ejected from it, Fiebing said.

The Navy pilot managed to eject before the plane crashed into the water around 8:40 p.m. yesterday, and was not injured, Navy and Coast Guard officials said.

It was unclear why the jet overshot the runway Thursday night, Fiebing said. The pilot told rescuers that the plane's brakes failed.

The runway typically used by Navy pilots was closed and the pilot was landing on an unfamiliar runway, a Navy spokesman told KNX radio in Los Angeles.

The cause of the crash is under investigation, Fiebing said.

The shaken pilot was not injured, but was taken to San Diego Naval Medical Center for examination and was in good condition, Coast Guard officials said. His name was not immediately released.

The plane, belonging to Strike Fighter Squadron 151 attached to the aircraft carrier Abraham Lincoln, had flown from the ship to North Island, Navy officials said.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 2:21:48 AM EST
Jet that crashed in bay was low on fuel, Navy says

Pilot diverted from landing on carrier
By James W. Crawley
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER
August 28, 2004

SignOnSanDiego

A $40 million F/A-18C Hornet jet that crashed into San Diego Bay while landing at the U.S. Naval Amphibious Base in Coronado was hauled out of the water Friday night, an official said.

A Navy jet that crashed into San Diego Bay on Thursday night had been diverted to North Island Naval Air Station because it was running low on fuel while practicing aircraft carrier landings offshore, the Navy said yesterday.

The pilot of the aircraft, an F/A-18C Hornet, had been trying to land on the carrier Abraham Lincoln before he was ordered to change course for the Coronado airfield, said Lt. Kim Marks, 3rd Fleet spokeswoman.

Upon landing, the pilot was unable to stop the jet, and it rolled past the end of the runway and into the bay. Lt. Jason Doyle Walker ejected safely, and San Diego Harbor Police pulled him from the water uninjured about 20 minutes later.

Walker reportedly told rescuers that his brakes failed upon landing.

An investigation is under way.

About 9 p.m. yesterday, the jet was hoisted in one piece from the water, said Coronado naval base spokesman Steve Fiebing.

The Hornet had rested in shallow water, its tail and the fuselage's upper half above the water. The Navy had placed a floating boom around the aircraft to contain any leaking fuel. Armed security boats guarded the plane yesterday and kept sightseers at a distance.

The jet probably will be carted a few hundred yards away to North Island's Naval Aviation Depot, which is the Navy's major repair center for Hornets.

A few more details about the crash were available.

The jet is a single-seat strike fighter from Squadron VFA-151, based at Lemoore Naval Air Station near Fresno.

The squadron was conducting routine carrier qualifications off Southern California. To maintain their proficiency for landing on carriers, pilots must regularly practice landings in which a metal tailhook snags wires stretched across the flight deck.

For safety reasons, the practices are conducted close to airfields so pilots having problems can make an emergency landing.

Procedure calls for aircraft to be diverted to the nearest airfield as a precaution whenever fuel tanks get low, Marks said.

The Hornet flew a routine approach course, passing over the beach near the Hotel del Coronado and landing on the airfield's northwest-pointing runway, Fiebing said.

The jet careened off the end of the runway and across the base's Moffett Road, then plunged into the bay, coming to a stop about 100 feet from shore.

Although the air base has an emergency arresting wire to halt wayward aircraft, Fiebing said he didn't know whether the system was operating Thursday night or if the Hornet had its tailhook extended.

The Hornet was the 13th F/A-18 jet since October 2003 involved in an accident that caused a death or serious damage to the jet.

Five Marine Corps aviators have been killed in four Hornet crashes during that time, according to Naval Safety Center records. There have been no Navy Hornet deaths.

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 2:58:39 AM EST

The jet probably will be carted a few hundred yards away to North Island's Naval Aviation Depot, which is the Navy's major repair center for Hornets.


Well, at least the tax payers wont have to pay for it to be transported halfway around the world to be fixed.

Kharn
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 3:01:08 AM EST
Can we laugh?????????
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 4:02:37 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:20:18 AM EST
My wifes dad works on these out at North Island. I'll have to ask him about this.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:24:07 AM EST

Originally Posted By kpel308:
That's gonna leave a mark...


on someone's career





Bigtime mark.............. Sucks to be him
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 6:24:20 AM EST
see that dot near the coast that says Point Loma? I was out surfing there yesterday, it was really nice and like usual you have a bunch of marine/navy choppers flying overhead.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:03:19 AM EST
Isn't this taking being a naval aviator a bit too far?

CW
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:05:26 AM EST
So that's where I parked my plane last night...
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:08:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 7:08:22 AM EST by FOX-]

Originally Posted By Cold_Warrior:
Isn't this taking being a naval aviator a bit too far?

CW





I didn't know they float.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:10:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 7:10:47 AM EST by Blackmore]

Originally Posted By kpel308:
That's gonna leave a mark...

on someone's career



"You screw up just this much, you'll be flying a cargo plane full of rubber dog shit out of Hong Kong!"
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:11:01 AM EST
Dangerous business, flying fighter jets
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:11:52 AM EST
I thought it wasn't the pilots fault, the breaks failed.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:14:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Hokie:
Dangerous business, flying fighter jets


Flying?

CW
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:21:13 AM EST

Originally Posted By FOX-:
I thought it wasn't the pilots fault, the breaks failed.



Only the forensic investigation will determine whether or not that statement is correct. The A/C will be checked out thoroughly by the mechs and anyone who had any role whatsoever will be deposed, including the pilot.

When all that is complete, the officer assigned to conduct the investigation will report out to the convening authority and responsibility will be placed.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:22:25 AM EST

Originally Posted By FOX-:

Originally Posted By Cold_Warrior:
Isn't this taking being a naval aviator a bit too far?

CW





I didn't know they float.



Well, it is, after all, a sea plane.....
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:27:33 AM EST
Maybe the Navy should mod the F-18 with this.

CW
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:28:20 AM EST
The runway typically used by Navy pilots was closed and the pilot was landing on an unfamiliar runway, a Navy spokesman told KNX radio in Los Angeles.

Bet he's got some splaining to do....
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 7:39:37 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 7:40:53 AM EST by moneyshot]

Originally Posted By FOX-:
I thought it wasn't the pilots fault, the breaks failed.



Well lets see, suppose he's botching most of his traps (embarrasement) and then hes finally diverted to the airfield for safety purposes because he cant sucessfully or safely trap on the aircraft carrier (more embarrasement) so he flys to a nearby airfield (that is closed!) and misjudges the landing (even more embarassement) then his ass is hauled out of the water why his plane sits there half out of the water. (embarrasement that is the icing on the cake). Yeah, I'd probably blurt out something about the brakes screwing up too.

I'll give him the benefit of the doubt for now, but that scenario just sucks if your a navy pilot. Talk about a career ender.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 8:25:06 AM EST

Originally Posted By moneyshot:

Originally Posted By FOX-:
I thought it wasn't the pilots fault, the breaks failed.



Well lets see, suppose he's botching most of his traps (embarrasement) and then hes finally diverted to the airfield for safety purposes because he cant sucessfully or safely trap on the aircraft carrier (more embarrasement) so he flys to a nearby airfield (that is closed!) and misjudges the landing (even more embarassement) then his ass is hauled out of the water why his plane sits there half out of the water. (embarrasement that is the icing on the cake). Yeah, I'd probably blurt out something about the brakes screwing up too.

I'll give him the benefit of the doubt for now, but that scenario just sucks if your a navy pilot. Talk about a career ender.



Sounds like the aeronautical equivalent of the confused, addled little old lady's/man's excuse for driving through the front of the store: "The gas pedal stuck!"

Madame Lazonga sees in her crystal ball this guy's future in aviation: something to do with baggage.....
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 8:39:15 AM EST
Dumbass.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 9:59:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By 1911greg:
see that dot near the coast that says Point Loma? I was out surfing there yesterday, it was really nice and like usual you have a bunch of marine/navy choppers flying overhead.



Hey, that's where I used to live. I was on the sub base for ~ 3yrs.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 10:23:27 AM EST
What's going to be more harmful to the environment the plane going into the water or all of the paperwork that will be involved with the Environmental Impact Report on this?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 10:26:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
What's going to be more harmful to the environment the plane going into the water or all of the paperwork that will be involved with the Environmental Impact Report on this?







it's funny because it's true !
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 10:27:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By Phil_in_Seattle:
What's going to be more harmful to the environment the plane going into the water or all of the paperwork that will be involved with the Environmental Impact Report on this?



[liberal]But all that paper consumed means that environmental workers will keep their jobs and food won't be taken out of their children's mouths. And at least they get to go home safely at night![/liberal]

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 10:28:33 AM EST
ouch. Class A mishap. He might just be warming a desk the rest of his career.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 12:26:54 PM EST
Well, when the fuel tanks have no fuel in them aircraft tend to float....


Originally Posted By FOX-:
I didn't know they float.

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 12:33:18 PM EST
The 13th crash? Why don't they ground the things and find out what the hell is wrong before another one goes under with a pilot in it!
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 12:46:35 PM EST

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Well, when the fuel tanks have no fuel in them aircraft tend to float....


Originally Posted By FOX-:
I didn't know they float.




How do you know they have no fuel?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:13:39 PM EST
You don't know if he didn't have an arresting hook failure.
That's a possibility since he was not able to land on the carrier.

NAS North Island is not closed. How deep out of your ass did you have to pull that out of.
The fucking article quote:
"The runway typically used by Navy pilots was closed and the pilot was landing on an unfamiliar runway."

NAS North Island has two runways. The normal runway is NOTAM'ed closed.
RUNWAY 18-36 CLOSED 24 MAY 20:26 UNTIL 01 OCT 23:59
The cross-field runway 11-29 is open.
The short field arresting gear for runway 29 is derigged:
A-GEAR: SHORT-FLD A-G RWY 29 NML DE-RIGGED.
The pilot made his approach from runway 29.
Runway 29 is NOTAM'ed about the arresting ger:
AVOID CNTRLINE LGT DUR RWY 29 ARRESTMENT TO PREVENT TAILHOOK BOUNCE.

So the guy may of had a legitmate problem with his arresting gear and had to take a divert to NAS North Island.
He was also probably low on fuel, and, for most train-X's there is no airborne tanker support so he could not IFR.
He is from NAS Lemoore, he might of never made an approach to NAS North Island.

If he was low on fuel when he landed an engine / engines may have flamed out. Loss of engines means loss of hydraulics. He may not of had time to react fast enough to blow the emergency pnumatic / hydraulic systems.

You just don't know.


Originally Posted By moneyshot:

Well lets see, suppose he's botching most of his traps (embarrasement) and then hes finally diverted to the airfield for safety purposes because he cant sucessfully or safely trap on the aircraft carrier (more embarrasement) so he flys to a nearby airfield (that is closed!) and misjudges the landing (even more embarassement) then his ass is hauled out of the water why his plane sits there half out of the water. (embarrasement that is the icing on the cake). Yeah, I'd probably blurt out something about the brakes screwing up too.

I'll give him the benefit of the doubt for now, but that scenario just sucks if your a navy pilot. Talk about a career ender.

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:14:49 PM EST
The report says so, plus the FUCKING AIRCRAFT IS FUCKING FLOATING IN THE GOD DAMN FUCKING WATER.


Originally Posted By FOX-:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Well, when the fuel tanks have no fuel in them aircraft tend to float....


Originally Posted By FOX-:
I didn't know they float.




How do you know they have no fuel?

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:16:58 PM EST

Originally Posted By KA3B:
The report says so, plus the FUCKING AIRCRAFT IS FUCKING FLOATING IN THE GOD DAMN FUCKING WATER.


Originally Posted By FOX-:

Originally Posted By KA3B:
Well, when the fuel tanks have no fuel in them aircraft tend to float....


Originally Posted By FOX-:
I didn't know they float.




How do you know they have no fuel?




You take things way to seriously man, you need anger managemant. Didn't you see the ?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:19:09 PM EST

Originally Posted By FOX-:
I thought it wasn't the pilots fault, the breaks failed.



As long as he still had brakes it should have stopped.

Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:22:34 PM EST
I'll give the poor guy the benefit of the doubt... if he is practicing carrier landings, I'm sure his regular runway landings were probly on par.

Educate me?

- BG
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:33:19 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 1:35:07 PM EST by OLY-M4gery]

Originally Posted By KA3B:
You don't know if he didn't have an arresting hook failure.
That's a possibility since he was not able to land on the carrier.

NAS North Island is not closed. How deep out of your ass did you have to pull that out of.
The fucking article quote:
"The runway typically used by Navy pilots was closed and the pilot was landing on an unfamiliar runway."

NAS North Island has two runways. The normal runway is NOTAM'ed closed.
RUNWAY 18-36 CLOSED 24 MAY 20:26 UNTIL 01 OCT 23:59
The cross-field runway 11-29 is open.
The short field arresting gear for runway 29 is derigged:
A-GEAR: SHORT-FLD A-G RWY 29 NML DE-RIGGED.
The pilot made his approach from runway 29.
Runway 29 is NOTAM'ed about the arresting ger:
AVOID CNTRLINE LGT DUR RWY 29 ARRESTMENT TO PREVENT TAILHOOK BOUNCE.

So the guy may of had a legitmate problem with his arresting gear and had to take a divert to NAS North Island.
He was also probably low on fuel, and, for most train-X's there is no airborne tanker support so he could not IFR.
He is from NAS Lemoore, he might of never made an approach to NAS North Island.

If he was low on fuel when he landed an engine / engines may have flamed out. Loss of engines means loss of hydraulics. He may not of had time to react fast enough to blow the emergency pnumatic / hydraulic systems.

You just don't know.




Maybe I'm reading it wrong, runway18-36 was closed. It is the runway generally used by USN flyers.

Secondary runway, 11-29, was open. The arrestor gear on 11-29 was NOT in operation. Even if it was the center of the runway causes tailhook-arrestor gear problems when used.

So according to that, the pilot was trying to land on a short, unfamiliar runway, w/o arresing gear. According to another poster the pilot wasn't getting proper breaks, I don't know how he know that. While attempting to land he overshot................... Seems like there may be signifigant mitigating circumstances.

The runway is further list as a "short" runway.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:33:54 PM EST
How do you write up a statement of charges on that?
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:36:44 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:43:05 PM EST
Ok, interesting phot. 11-29 doesn't appear short. But the "short field" arrestor is not in operation.

I wonder what position the tailhook was in.
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 1:51:00 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/29/2004 1:57:14 PM EST by Kharn]
OLY-M4gery:

I wonder what position the tailhook was in.

Why? The short field gear was derigged, there was nothing for the hook to catch.

One time about 4 years ago, I was sitting about 300 feet from the runway when an F14 doing touch-and-goes (with some new equipment, prior to doing simulator carrier catapults and landings, at Pax River, MD) and on one he went a little further down the runway than usual before rotating. He hit the short-field gear and no-way, no-how did he didnt get airborne that time. The radio traffic was kinda funny as the short field gear was supposed to have been removed hours before but someone dropped the ball.

Also, "short" to us is a lot different from "short" to a supersonic fighter pilot.

Kharn
Link Posted: 8/29/2004 4:24:18 PM EST
NAS North Island will never be closed. One of two depot level maintenance facilities is located there, along with COMNAVAIRPAC. 3 carriers are home ported out of there, also, along with USS Coronado.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 3:49:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Kharn:
OLY-M4gery:

I wonder what position the tailhook was in.

Why? The short field gear was derigged, there was nothing for the hook to catch.

One time about 4 years ago, I was sitting about 300 feet from the runway when an F14 doing touch-and-goes (with some new equipment, prior to doing simulator carrier catapults and landings, at Pax River, MD) and on one he went a little further down the runway than usual before rotating. He hit the short-field gear and no-way, no-how did he didnt get airborne that time. The radio traffic was kinda funny as the short field gear was supposed to have been removed hours before but someone dropped the ball.

Also, "short" to us is a lot different from "short" to a supersonic fighter pilot.

Kharn



There is still a long field arrestor, I doubt they were "short fielding" w/o a working arrestor.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 3:54:01 AM EST
boy, thats the breaks....
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 4:25:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/30/2004 4:26:38 AM EST by FMD]
IANANFP (I am not a navy fighter pilot) but...

I have been to NAS North Island. A buddy of mine is a HH Lt Cmdr, flying Seahawks, and the wife and I stopped by last June (when he was deployd off the Korean Peninsula). His wife gave us a tour of the NAS just before the decomissioning of the Connie.

North Island is the "home" of the Abe Lincoln, along with a lot of the 7th fleet carriers. I believe that the Helo squadrons are all based on North Island, but the fixed wing aircraft, when they come home, are normally ferried to Mirimar...unless they need to be repaired. In that case, they go to North Island.

The talk about "long" and "short" runways is kinda funny. I'd say neither runway is longer than 5000 feet. There really isn't a lot of real estate there for a military airfield (but again, IANANFP).

I watched some training with fixed wing prop aircraft do "touch and gos" on Runway 29, but never saw a jet land. A couple of P3-type birds, yes, but no jets.

I'm guessing he was ferrying to NI for repairs, and the repair bill just got a little bigger is all.

-FMD

Edited for grammer.
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 4:28:03 AM EST

Originally Posted By Blackmore:

Originally Posted By kpel308:
That's gonna leave a mark...

on someone's career



"You screw up just this much, you'll be flying a cargo plane full of rubber dog shit out of Hong Kong!"





Now the Navy has a new ship! USS Hornet, oh wait that's been taken already . . .
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 6:30:49 AM EST
Being nice.....

The USS Lincoln is stationed at NAVSTA Everett, Wa.
The USS Stennis, USS Reagan and USS Nimitz are stationed at NAS North Island.

All of the west coast CONUS Navy helo squadrons are stationed out of NAS North Island.
There are 7 fixed wing squadrons plus NAS North Island flying 4 different types of fixed wing aircraft.
C-9B
C-2A(R)
UC-12B
S-3B
Miramar is owned by the US Marine Corps.
No fixed wing Navy aircraft are taken to MCAS Miramar.
The air wing's Marine F-18 squadron is the only squadron that goes to MCAS Miramar after work-ups/cruise.

The Navy F-18's go to NAS Lemoore.
The Navy C-2's go to NAS North Island.
The Navy E-2's go to NAS Point Mugu.
The Navy F-14's go to NAS Oceana.
The Navy EA-6B's go to NAS Whidbey Island.

There are two runways at NAS North Island.
Runway 11-29.
Runway 18-36.

Runway 11-29 is 7500 feet long by 300 feet wide.
Runway 18-36 is 8000 feet long by 200 feet wide.

On runway 11-29 the arresting gear on runway 29 is derigged.
It is kept derigged because the C-9's and other aircraft will pull the gear out of battery.
It is supposed to be rigged if an aircraft requests it.
Runway 29's long field arresting gear (runway 11's shortfield arresting gear) is kept rigged.

Without knowing more it sounds like the pilot did not declare an emergency nor did he request that runway 29's short field arresting gear be rigged.



Originally Posted By FMD:
IANANFP (I am not a navy fighter pilot) but...

I have been to NAS North Island. A buddy of mine is a HH Lt Cmdr, flying Seahawks, and the wife and I stopped by last June (when he was deployd off the Korean Peninsula). His wife gave us a tour of the NAS just before the decomissioning of the Connie.

North Island is the "home" of the Abe Lincoln, along with a lot of the 7th fleet carriers. I believe that the Helo squadrons are all based on North Island, but the fixed wing aircraft, when they come home, are normally ferried to Mirimar...unless they need to be repaired. In that case, they go to North Island.

The talk about "long" and "short" runways is kinda funny. I'd say neither runway is longer than 5000 feet. There really isn't a lot of real estate there for a military airfield (but again, IANANFP).

I watched some training with fixed wing prop aircraft do "touch and gos" on Runway 29, but never saw a jet land. A couple of P3-type birds, yes, but no jets.

I'm guessing he was ferrying to NI for repairs, and the repair bill just got a little bigger is all.

-FMD

Edited for grammer.

Link Posted: 8/30/2004 7:53:44 AM EST
wow, that would suck to end up in the water
Link Posted: 8/30/2004 8:01:49 AM EST
Pilot retention being what it is, I'll bet he skates. He had to eject, or risk getting his leather jacket wet.
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