Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 4/4/2006 6:34:33 AM EDT
I need some information from those of you in the know. I have always assumed that field of view meant the feet you could see from one side of you scope to the other at 100yds. like so.



Is this correct?

If that is correct and the fov is 5' at 100 yds would it be 10' at 200yds or is it exponential and be 15' tripling every 100yds(equation)?
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 6:38:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 6:44:39 AM EDT by Greenhorn]
It is linear. You are talking about only one dimension - diameter. For two-dimensional things like gravity, it decreases at the square of the distance. Or for something 3D like expanding gas, the pressure would decrease at the cube of the expansion distanace. If you double the diameter of a ball of air, the pressure would decrease 8 times.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:28:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
It is linear. You are talking about only one dimension - diameter. For two-dimensional things like gravity, it decreases at the square of the distance. Or for something 3D like expanding gas, the pressure would decrease at the cube of the expansion distanace. If you double the diameter of a ball of air, the pressure would decrease 8 times.





How about is my illustration correct or not? Yes or NO would suffice!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:29:25 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 7:32:03 AM EDT by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By hakim:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
It is linear. You are talking about only one dimension - diameter. For two-dimensional things like gravity, it decreases at the square of the distance. Or for something 3D like expanding gas, the pressure would decrease at the cube of the expansion distanace. If you double the diameter of a ball of air, the pressure would decrease 8 times.





How about is my illustration correct or not? Yes or NO would suffice!



I don't know the exact definition of FOV. I was answering your second question. Angular size decreases linearly with distanace. Thanks for appreciating my taking the time to answer.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:34:14 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By hakim:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
It is linear. You are talking about only one dimension - diameter. For two-dimensional things like gravity, it decreases at the square of the distance. Or for something 3D like expanding gas, the pressure would decrease at the cube of the expansion distanace. If you double the diameter of a ball of air, the pressure would decrease 8 times.





How about is my illustration correct or not? Yes or NO would suffice!



I don't know the exact definition of FOV. I was answering your second question. Angular size decreases linerally with distanace. Thanks for appreciating my taking the time to answer.



Sorry! I am just not interested in expanding gases in this question just distances. I apologize!
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:35:53 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 7:36:34 AM EDT by Greenhorn]

Originally Posted By hakim:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By hakim:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
It is linear. You are talking about only one dimension - diameter. For two-dimensional things like gravity, it decreases at the square of the distance. Or for something 3D like expanding gas, the pressure would decrease at the cube of the expansion distanace. If you double the diameter of a ball of air, the pressure would decrease 8 times.





How about is my illustration correct or not? Yes or NO would suffice!



I don't know the exact definition of FOV. I was answering your second question. Angular size decreases linerally with distanace. Thanks for appreciating my taking the time to answer.



Sorry! I am just not interested in expanding gases in this question just distances. I apologize!



Accepted. Sorry for the drawn-out answer. I tend to do that.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:46:43 AM EDT
For some reason this thread seems like sitcom material. The mental picture I get from reading the exchanges is quite funny.

BTW, hakim, I understand it the way you have it drawn. Not that it is correct, but it is the way I interprit it.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:49:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 7:50:25 AM EDT by hakim]

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By hakim:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:

Originally Posted By hakim:

Originally Posted By Greenhorn:
It is linear. You are talking about only one dimension - diameter. For two-dimensional things like gravity, it decreases at the square of the distance. Or for something 3D like expanding gas, the pressure would decrease at the cube of the expansion distanace. If you double the diameter of a ball of air, the pressure would decrease 8 times.





How about is my illustration correct or not? Yes or NO would suffice!



I don't know the exact definition of FOV. I was answering your second question. Angular size decreases linerally with distanace. Thanks for appreciating my taking the time to answer.



Sorry! I am just not interested in expanding gases in this question just distances. I apologize!



Accepted. Sorry for the drawn-out answer. I tend to do that.



Thanks for the help anyway Greenhorn! I did find it. Here it is if you wanted to know.

Field of View (F.O.V.)
The side-to-side measurement of the circular viewing field or subject area. It is defined by the width in feet or meters of the area visible at 100 yards or meters. A wide field of view makes it easier to spot game and track moving targets. Generally, the higher the magnification, the narrower the field of view.


Sounds like I was right.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:55:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By hakim:
I need some information from those of you in the know. I have always assumed that field of view meant the feet you could see from one side of you scope to the other at 100yds. like so.

img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-2/1142219/fov.jpg

Is this correct?

If that is correct and the fov is 5' at 100 yds would it be 10' at 200yds or is it exponential and be 15' tripling every 100yds(equation)?



Yes, it extrapolates linearly just like MOA. IOW, 5'@100yds, 10'@200yds, etc.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:58:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By hakim:
I need some information from those of you in the know. I have always assumed that field of view meant the feet you could see from one side of you scope to the other at 100yds. like so.

img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-2/1142219/fov.jpg

Is this correct?

If that is correct and the fov is 5' at 100 yds would it be 10' at 200yds or is it exponential and be 15' tripling every 100yds(equation)?



Short version is that it means Field Of View, in the case of your diagram, it says that your field of view is 5 feet at 100 yards, meaning that the area visible in your scope at that range is a circle with a 5 foot diameter.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:59:16 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ranxerox911:

Originally Posted By hakim:
I need some information from those of you in the know. I have always assumed that field of view meant the feet you could see from one side of you scope to the other at 100yds. like so.

img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-2/1142219/fov.jpg

Is this correct?

If that is correct and the fov is 5' at 100 yds would it be 10' at 200yds or is it exponential and be 15' tripling every 100yds(equation)?



Yes, it extrapolates linearly just like MOA. IOW, 5'@100yds, 10'@200yds, etc.



+1, good info, particularly for a GD thread
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 7:59:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 8:01:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Ranxerox911:

Originally Posted By hakim:
I need some information from those of you in the know. I have always assumed that field of view meant the feet you could see from one side of you scope to the other at 100yds. like so.

img.villagephotos.com/p/2006-2/1142219/fov.jpg

Is this correct?

If that is correct and the fov is 5' at 100 yds would it be 10' at 200yds or is it exponential and be 15' tripling every 100yds(equation)?



Yes, it extrapolates linearly just like MOA. IOW, 5'@100yds, 10'@200yds, etc.



So a FOV of 5' at 100yds would be 25'at 500yds? Sorry about the simpleton questions.
Top Top