Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 11/21/2003 10:09:50 PM EDT
I see all the cars and trucks with them on all the time. Are they suposed to be used in fog with the regular head lights.......or solo?
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 10:20:26 PM EDT
I use mine whenever any extra light is needed.

I NEVER use them when I am behind another vehicle or just for show.
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 10:42:04 PM EDT
I don't know if it is true today, but in Cali-fornia, you must operate the fog lights in conjunction with the headlights, and you can not light just the fog lights seperately from the headlights.
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 10:55:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 11:16:43 PM EDT
The only ones I hate are the bright colored fog lights, bright yellow, purple, etc. I think the bright yellow is good for driving in the fog but on a clear night? Too many guido wannabes around here are souping up their rice burners with those. I use my fog lights (same bulbs as headlights) with my headlight because my truck is lifted a little so a little extra security helps.
Link Posted: 11/21/2003 11:44:57 PM EDT
I had an 89 LX Mustang V8 Notchback. Got it new. Anyway it didn't have the GT light package but it did have all the wiring harnesses for succch as I guess all chasis start out the same on the line. Anyway, I mounted a set of Marchal driving lightsand use dthe factory wiring replacing the headlamp switch with that of the GT modeel and installed a fused link to allow operation during high beams. those were and still are the brightest lights I have ever seen on a car! Supposed to have some 6000 ft reflective range whatever that meant but sometimes I used them alone w/o headlights, yes you could do that with the factory wiring.


My 03 GMC Sierra is set up the same way, no ligts but harnesses for them and I could install the factory switch in the dash. Just need a good set to put in the mounts. Any suggestions guys?
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 6:11:56 AM EDT
A properly set up fog light should light the area between the front of the vehicle and the point where the low beams throw their pattern. They should light the area in front of low and to the sides of the vehicle. Driving lights on the other hand are used to enhance the high beams. I have had DPS troopers tell me as long as they dont shine in the eyes of oncoming traffic they are legal. Also in Texas they have to be at least 18 inches off the roadway and no higher than 48 inches.

We just bought a 2004 Mazda Tribute and the fog lights will work independant of the headlights. They do still go off if the hi beams are on though.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 6:17:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/22/2003 6:17:39 AM EDT by Wave]
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 6:34:46 AM EDT
www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF5/593.html

intersting read about YELLOW lights
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 7:03:15 AM EDT
I'm under the impression that most lights beyond your headlights are for show. Perhaps more lights were needed in some situations in the pre-halogen headlight days. The brights on my 94 GMC are seriously bright, and I can't imagine needing more. This being said, if you want a wider cone of light, like for off road or specialty use, you've got no choice but to add lights.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 7:20:06 AM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF5/593.html

intersting read about YELLOW lights



I will disagree based on my own experiences on the road.
The yellow light does not 'penetrate' the fog, it merely reflects less than white light, making it easier to distinguish details, to a point.

If the fog is THAT bad, pull off of the road; you're lights won't help no matter what color they are.

I do think under normal circumstances, the yellow works better than bright white light in the fog.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 7:39:34 AM EDT
that is pretty much my observation as well. Although they noted in the article that may be due to the drivers eye and perception moreso than light penetration.

mike
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 7:54:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Troy:
And, in fact, most (all?) cars that come with foglights from the factory are set up so that the fogs will only come on with the standard headlight beams. No headlights, or high beams, and the fogs go off.

-Troy



WHICH TOTALLY GOES AGAINST THE REASON FOR FOGLIGHTS!!!!

This totally gets me nuts as to why manufacturers do this. And the fucktards that drive around with the high output "fog lights" blazing away blinding oncoming traffic that aren't fog lights at all.

True fog lights are supposed to throw a low wash beam a shorter distance in front of your vehicle as when you are driving in dense fog the regular headlight wash only serves to blind you. And you just don't need them at all, unless you are actually in fog.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 8:54:36 AM EDT
I drive to work through the mountains at night, and need all the light I can get. It may be hours between vehicles, and I strain my eyes to see caribou and moose lurking in the bushes next to the road.

What do truckers use? When one of those are lit up, it looks like a town over the hill several miles away. THAT is what I need.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 9:13:54 AM EDT
Most European cars also have a set of REAR fog lights, seperate from driving and brake lights, you turn them on for better visibility (for the benefits of drivers behind you). They're so bright they look like brake lights, the manual usually suggests you leave them off until you need them.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 9:19:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gopher:
A properly set up fog light should light the area between the front of the vehicle and the point where the low beams throw their pattern. They should light the area in front of low and to the sides of the vehicle. Driving lights on the other hand are used to enhance the high beams. I have had DPS troopers tell me as long as they dont shine in the eyes of oncoming traffic they are legal. Also in Texas they have to be at least 18 inches off the roadway and no higher than 48 inches.

We just bought a 2004 Mazda Tribute and the fog lights will work independant of the headlights. They do still go off if the hi beams are on though.




My dodge ram came with fog lights......they work independant of the headlights but like your mazada when the hibeams go on the fog lights go off. If I have both the headlights and fog lights on, and i barely push the brights..not all the way.....then everything is lit up...ofcourse it prolly pisses everyone off!
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 9:36:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Troy:
And, in fact, most (all?) cars that come with foglights from the factory are set up so that the fogs will only come on with the standard headlight beams. No headlights, or high beams, and the fogs go off.

-Troy



??? Umm most fog lights that I have encountered will come on with the parking lights. The will stay on with regular headlights, and turn off if the hi-beams come on.

No they are not for driving instead of headlights.

Of course lot's of people seem to think they are somehow cooler driving with parking or fog lights on.

The car makers should make it so that the car's dashlights don't come on unless the headlights are on.

Too dark to see the dashboard, dark enuff for headlights.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 9:56:39 AM EDT
Good quality (Hella's with the free-form reflector) fog & driving lights can be an asset if aimed properly. 90% of the aftermarket fog & driving lights are mis-aimed, either pointing down at the road (useless) or into the eyes of oncoming drivers (dangerous). Any tinting (yellow or the ridiculous *blue*) of the bulb or lens reduces output of the lamp. Cheap junk aftermarket lights with poorly designed reflectors and lenses are a waste of money, offering little additional light and potentially creating hazards for other drivers.

European spec headlight laws allow higher power beams, but require different cutoff patterns than domestic lenses. Some folks do run Euro lights in the US, although this is (or at least was) technically illegal.

One thing I do find bothersome are HID lights on oncoming cars, I don't know if the retina is particularly sensitive to the wavelengths produced by HID bulbs, but I find night vision takes longer to recover after being dazzled by an oncoming HID-equipped car.

Link Posted: 11/22/2003 10:39:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Duffy:
Most European cars also have a set of REAR fog lights, seperate from driving and brake lights, you turn them on for better visibility (for the benefits of drivers behind you). They're so bright they look like brake lights, the manual usually suggests you leave them off until you need them.


I've seen these and they seem like a very good concept to avoid being rear ended if people are driving at reasonable speeds in moderate fog. The red rear ones that I've seen are quite bright.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 10:46:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By M4_Aiming_at_U:
I use mine whenever any extra light is needed.

I NEVER use them when I am behind another vehicle or just for show.



Same here I am not trying to impress anyone in my Shadow.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 11:41:18 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Valkyrie:
My 03 GMC Sierra is set up the same way, no ligts but harnesses for them and I could install the factory switch in the dash. Just need a good set to put in the mounts. Any suggestions guys?



I heard somewhere that unless it came with fog lights you''ll have to have the trucks computer chip reprogramed to use the stock wiring.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 11:49:55 AM EDT
Everyone should know that in fog the more light you throw out(read high beams) the more light gets reflected back to you and the harder it is to see. I guess the yellow tint is to improve contrast like a yellow pair of shooting glasses. Always use low beams in fog, you be able to see better. Like others have said, it the fog gets so bad you can't see find a spot far off the road and pull over.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 11:57:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BusMaster007:
... I will disagree based on my own experiences on the road. ... {re: yellow lights}


ditto

Also, IMHO, if you can’t use fog lamps independently of the low beams, they’re just about worthless anyway.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 1:45:51 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 2:00:31 PM EDT
The fog lights on my SuperDuty illuminate the lines on either side of the lane immediatly in front of me, making it easier to keep it in the lanes.

Pretty handy, actually.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 4:24:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sherm8404:

Originally Posted By Troy:
And, in fact, most (all?) cars that come with foglights from the factory are set up so that the fogs will only come on with the standard headlight beams. No headlights, or high beams, and the fogs go off.

-Troy



WHICH TOTALLY GOES AGAINST THE REASON FOR FOGLIGHTS!!!!

This totally gets me nuts as to why manufacturers do this. And the fucktards that drive around with the high output "fog lights" blazing away blinding oncoming traffic that aren't fog lights at all.

True fog lights are supposed to throw a low wash beam a shorter distance in front of your vehicle as when you are driving in dense fog the regular headlight wash only serves to blind you. And you just don't need them at all, unless you are actually in fog.



Federal regulations say only 2 sets of headlights may operate at one time. Highbeams are counted as "2" sets so the fogs must switch off.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 7:44:26 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TNFrank:
Everyone should know that in fog the more light you throw out(read high beams) the more light gets reflected back to you and the harder it is to see. I guess the yellow tint is to improve contrast like a yellow pair of shooting glasses. Always use low beams in fog, you be able to see better. Like others have said, it the fog gets so bad you can't see find a spot far off the road and pull over.



It's called the Tindle Effect.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 8:06:28 PM EDT
All truckers know the saying "Fog lights for gay rights".


Bobwrench
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 8:13:06 PM EDT
I'm with Troy... and some states have laws regarding the use of "auxiliary" lights. FL states that only one pair of auxiliary lights may be added to your vehicle (it was in the Driver's Handbook), but it doesn't seem to be enforced.
Link Posted: 11/22/2003 10:15:45 PM EDT
fogs can be either yellow or clear. They are to fill the gaps below and to the sides of lowbeams. Yellow can help contrast in certain but not all situations. If you are driving fast enough that your lowbeams and fogs don't illuminate something in time you are going too fast.

Highbeams aimed correctly will reflect way too much.

Depending on where you are the fog lines should be picked up by the lights. Me, I don't like to drive when I can't see the rear/brake lights on the car in front. A "rear fog light" is a good idea but still driving fast in fog is not a good idea.

CHP used to use clear Perlux with louvers underneath the bumpers in the San Bernardino Mountains where they got a lot of clouds at road level (road elevation up to 8000 ft) in the mountains. The moisture in the clouds/fog would make anything not aimed low useless or worse due to reflection. Coastal and tule fogs often have a lot less moisture and are a little less reflection prone to poorly aimed lights. Real fog lights are for wide and low in crummy weather not for looks.
Top Top