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Posted: 10/7/2004 7:45:34 PM EST
PCP aka Dust/wet/purple rain/water, etc, etc. Seems to be making its way back, in fact it is starting to become popular in the hip hop underground. It is becoming so popular that a few rappers have dedicated whole CDs to it. I'm wondering about experience with dealing with dust heads, here there are plenty of crack friend and heroin junkies who get arrested and cops can usually deal with them just fine, but people on PCP seem to be a larger struggle for LEOs. Have any officers here have to deal with dust heads and what was it like?
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 3:59:55 AM EST
Just a couple of times and I got lucky.

Basically, they were a lobotomized human being while under the influence. Maybe they can understand very simple commands, and might comply if they felt like it. Very, very, very volatile. SHort term memory for them was about 15 seconds (at best). Stay calm and talk to them like they were five-year olds, firm but kind.

Neither of mine fought (although there are a couple of others who may have been on PCP who did, but we'll never really know what those guys were on, if anything. Those guys were both violent naked folks running around in traffic (feeling "hot" and removing all clothing seems to be a PCP signature). Pain compliance tactics, OC and batons were pretty much useless. I imagine the new Tasers would work, but have no first hand knowledge on that. What did work was lots of officers.

The ones I know were on PCP were both DWIs. The DRE interviews were absolutely unbelievable, and both had to be terminated because the suspect was starting to become unstable. I actually got a defense subpoena on one of those cases. I called the defense attorney to see if I could be released, as there was no way in hell this one would or even should go to trial, and I was kind of puzzled as to why I was being subpoenaed. When I spoke to the lawyer, he said that he would need me in court, because his client blew a .002 and was therefore obviously NOT DWI. I asked him if he had seen the video, and he had not. I strongly suggested that he check out the FST and DRE videotape and left it at that. I got a voice mail from the Prosecutor the next day telling me that the Defense had finally requested the video, and had entered a plea agreement a few hours later.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 6:21:49 AM EST
I have had to fight two dust heads.
The first one had been walking by an auto accident and was trying to fight the rescue workers when they got there. He had no connection with the accident, just happened to occur near him. It took 8 officers toget him into custody and he ended up needing lots of stitches to his face (fell face first onto a chrome car bumper) and had a dislocated left shoulder (from being forced into the cuffing position). He was still trying to fight when he was on the table at the ER.

The other was a guy who was at his girlfriends apartment and he started acting crazy, so she called us. He would act like a calm drunk for about a minute and then he would get aditated for a minute and then repeat the cycle. He was unable to speak intelligibly and when we talked to him he had a very confused look. We waited for him to get into his calmer groove and then cuffed his hands and feet. We carried him into the cruiser and then he started getting agitated again and tried to kick out the back windows, so we ended up hog tying him.

PCP makes them feel hot, so many times they will be at least partially naked (as both of mine were). It makes it a little bit harder to gain control of them. PCP suppresses the nervous system, so they don't feel much, if any, pain. This is what allows them to exhibit apparent feats of super human strength.
Link Posted: 10/8/2004 6:57:06 AM EST
Not for years. (Those were very painful however) Everyone down here is busy with crack and occasionally, heroin.
Link Posted: 10/9/2004 8:48:11 AM EST
I'm a DRE and while I haven't dealt with anyone on PCP directly I have seen them in a jail setting and on training videos. PCP was designed originally as a battle field anesthetic to replace morphine. PCP has the advantage of increasing the vitals, while morphine does the opposite. The downside of PCP are all the things we're familiar with: aggressive behavior, extremely high tolerance for pain, hallucinations, cyclic behavior, etc. It was in Vietnam that we found out about these downsides and returned to using morphine. It's called a "dissociative anesthetic" because it can make the user feel like they are outside their body. People on PCP many times will be running around naked because it increases their body temp. and they may be sweating in the middle of winter. Also it affects the thought process and if you are questioning them it may take 30 sec to answer a question.

Ketamine is is in the same family of drugs and is very similar to PCP.
Link Posted: 10/9/2004 9:01:20 AM EST
I worked in a county Jail some years back. Have seen a 50 year old woman who was brought in apparently on "The Dust". Took 6 or 7 of us to get the little woman into The Restraint (Rubber)Room. Probably weighed 100lbs soaking wet. She Broke the chain on one set of cuffs. She would be all hyper one minute and Drunk slow the next. Murmuring, Couldn't understand a word she said. Slobbering like some kind of rabbid animal

Crazy Stuff, I've seen all kinds. Will Never forget the way she acted.
Link Posted: 10/9/2004 11:24:29 AM EST
Tactical Edge (or Street Survival) has a pic of a set of cuffs opened by a dust head...
with his teeth.

Great imprint in the metal.
Link Posted: 10/9/2004 1:45:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By AHansen:
I'm a DRE and while I haven't dealt with anyone on PCP directly I have seen them in a jail setting and on training videos. PCP was designed originally as a battle field anesthetic to replace morphine. PCP has the advantage of increasing the vitals, while morphine does the opposite. The downside of PCP are all the things we're familiar with: aggressive behavior, extremely high tolerance for pain, hallucinations, cyclic behavior, etc. It was in Vietnam that we found out about these downsides and returned to using morphine. It's called a "dissociative anesthetic" because it can make the user feel like they are outside their body. People on PCP many times will be running around naked because it increases their body temp. and they may be sweating in the middle of winter. Also it affects the thought process and if you are questioning them it may take 30 sec to answer a question.

Ketamine is is in the same family of drugs and is very similar to PCP.



Very informative post for #3, thanks for the contribution
Link Posted: 10/10/2004 8:58:18 PM EST
According to my research is was an anthestic for animals till 1958 where the made Sernyl which was a painkiller for people (Oddly enough Sernyls name was apparently derived from the word serenity). Dust is becoming bigger and bigger here and apparently there is a reason I should be scared of it.
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