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4/22/2019 5:32:20 PM
Posted: 1/21/2013 3:04:22 PM EDT
In the unlikely event my order actually ships and gets here, I have a few things I plan to duracoat.

I've used durabake before with good results, but it's my first time with duracoat so I actually read the instructions, and apparently It's extremely sensitive to silicone... one thing I read said that an open tube of silicone in the same room can cause the finish to bubble...

I use silicone based lubes around the house and on some of my gun related stuff (especially my reloading press), and I'm nearly positive there has been cross contamination. I've searched and all I can find for "remove silicone" seems to deal with caulk or RTV, not the lubricant.

Anything out there capable of removing silicone residue?
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:22:36 PM EDT
Are you sure the reaction is with silicone (which is pretty inert), and not something mixed with it?

For instance, caulk and such contain acetone, which would almost certainly react with the Duracoat.
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:28:39 PM EDT
It says "uncured silicone" so I suppose it's possible that it could be a component of the silicone.

http://www.houtsenterprises.net/dur_easy.html

That still makes me wonder... if it were acetone (or whatever other substance) why wouldn't they mention that as well?


Either way, if nothing else it could cause adhesion problems in my case. Does a degreaser (either surfactant or solvent) get rid of it?
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 3:50:18 PM EDT
As a long time painter of automobiles, silicone like that found in tire dressing for detailing an automobile or some gun lubes will cause paint finishes to "fisheye". I am assuming duracoat is very similar to any other paint and will be affected in a similar fashion. Preparation is key when surfaces have been contaminated with silicone based aerosols. Even after you have prepped the part it is still possible for the silicone to have soaked into porous metals and will still come through even on clean parts. Boiling the parts in soapy water or cleaner that does not contain any sort of waxes or silicone can prevent the silicone from bleeding out by sweating them out while boiling. There are companies that offer cleaning in hi temp solvent tanks that do this and that could also be an option. Just remember, when you think it's clean, clean it again and that should do it! Lol! Seriously though, silicone is hell for a painter...
Link Posted: 1/21/2013 4:15:33 PM EDT
Originally Posted By READY2ROLL:
As a long time painter of automobiles, silicone like that found in tire dressing for detailing an automobile or some gun lubes will cause paint finishes to "fisheye". I am assuming duracoat is very similar to any other paint and will be affected in a similar fashion. Preparation is key when surfaces have been contaminated with silicone based aerosols. Even after you have prepped the part it is still possible for the silicone to have soaked into porous metals and will still come through even on clean parts. Boiling the parts in soapy water or cleaner that does not contain any sort of waxes or silicone can prevent the silicone from bleeding out by sweating them out while boiling. There are companies that offer cleaning in hi temp solvent tanks that do this and that could also be an option. Just remember, when you think it's clean, clean it again and that should do it! Lol! Seriously though, silicone is hell for a painter...


I nominate this as most informative first post ever

Seriously this is good to know. I have some plastic stock parts, so they should be OK. I also have a pistol I plan to finish however it currently has a finish on it so hopefully it should be OK.

Thanks and welcome to the site!
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