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1/22/2020 12:12:56 PM
Posted: 10/9/2007 9:10:05 AM EST

ever think they are a front for some sort of chineese mafia. they open and close everyday in the strangest locations. a few around my house, the buffet type, hardly ever have any business but yet stay open.

Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:14:25 AM EST
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:16:08 AM EST
Can't trust those pesky chineese, with their tasty food and attractive women!
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:17:35 AM EST
Only place I have ever seen where they are open 20 hours a day and its the same people there all 20 hours.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:18:26 AM EST
I have noticed that too. A lot of our Chinese restaurants are really empty. I think part of it is that they have family members who work for cheap.

Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:18:26 AM EST
There is one that has to be a front near me. It is a very high end place in a nice part of town. Always a bunch of really really expensive cars parked there and no one in sight when you go in. I mean super empty. I think there must be some kind of high stakes gaming going on in the basement.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:19:59 AM EST
They're a front to get other Chinese into the country. One family owns it, operates it for a while (justifying their stay here) and once they get on a perm stay basis w/ the .gov - they sell it to the next who wants to come over here & appear to be beneficial to society...
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:20:01 AM EST
My favorite Chinese place seems like it is open all the time but it is always busy. Plus he is a good conservative. He always has Rush on between 12 and 3
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:30:53 AM EST

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.


Damn, that logic ruins a good tinfoil theory every time.

I remember in the 80s, everybody was scratching their head how the Vietnamese famillies who came here with nothing started making a decent living. The welfare leeches couldn't believe it was possible and would start stupid theories about how we were taking part in organized crime. All was bogus of course, neither my family nor any other Vietnamese family I knew of, ever provided for themselves by doin anything but hard work. My dad worked 50 hrs a week as a janitor to provide for us and put himself through college. We never took any kind of welfare or aid of any kind. Families that ran restaurants and convenience stores had the whole family working around the clock.

Those strange locations is part of what keeps costs down. Along with manning the businesses with your family, that's what allows them to make money even when business is low.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:33:58 AM EST
To be honest, most Chinese restaurants use the cheapest ingredients they can get away with, so it saves a bit of money.

The one nearest me, however, is the best Chinese restaurant I've ever been to. WONDERFUL food. Then again, it's run by Koreans.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:35:01 AM EST

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
To be honest, most Chinese restaurants use the cheapest ingredients they can get away with, so it saves a bit of money.

The one nearest me, however, is the best Chinese restaurant I've ever been to. WONDERFUL food. Then again, it's run by Koreans.
That must be why it costs more to make it at home than it does going and getting it at the restaurant.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:35:44 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:37:01 AM EST

Originally Posted By rmeredit:
They're a front to get other Chinese into the country. One family owns it, operates it for a while (justifying their stay here) and once they get on a perm stay basis w/ the .gov - they sell it to the next who wants to come over here & appear to be beneficial to society...


You're thinking of Middle Easterners and gas stations.

That's how it's done at this one chain of gas stations in town. One guy runs the business until he's got enough money to be moderately wealthy back home, then he sells it to a brother or cousin and moves back home. They ran the place from the late 80's until two years ago. They finally ran out of cousins and sold the chain to some white guy.

One wanted my dad to install security cameras in his house because every time his brother came over, he ate candy out of the dish on the coffee table.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:40:25 AM EST

Originally Posted By macman37:
Can't trust those pesky chineese, with their tasty food and attractive women!


too funny
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:41:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:

Originally Posted By Swindle1984:
To be honest, most Chinese restaurants use the cheapest ingredients they can get away with, so it saves a bit of money.

The one nearest me, however, is the best Chinese restaurant I've ever been to. WONDERFUL food. Then again, it's run by Koreans.
That must be why it costs more to make it at home than it does going and getting it at the restaurant.


That's it exactly. They get the cheapest stuff they can from anywhere, even if it's a little stale. Between that and hiring family as cheap labor, they keep costs down so most of their business is profit. You'll notice the really good Chinese restaurants are either run by non-Chinese (Koreans, usually, but sometimes Vietnamese, the odd Japanese, etc.) or don't follow the formula: they get the best ingredients they can find and hire outside the family, usually resulting in delicious but over-priced food.


One Chinese buffet I went to was run by a little old Chinese lady. She didn't quite grasp the concept of a buffet. You couldn't go back for seconds until you cleaned your plate. If you got it from the buffet, you WERE going to eat it. And if you didn't eat everything on the last plate you got, she charged extra for wasting food.

Needless to say, her restaurant didn't last very long.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:43:16 AM EST
It's the same thing with "Persian rug stores"

Have you ever seen one that wasn't having a "going out of business" sale?
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:46:15 AM EST
Couple of joints in my area all are open sick hours. Those folks seem to work like dogs.
One that I had a link to was renting a beat up tiny 2BR house and must of had about 10 adults and 4 or 5 school aged kids. Besides running the restaraunt,keeping the kids well scrubbed and polite,you could see the laundry (coats,aprons ,napkins,and tablecloths) on the clothesline and a huge veggi garden.

They were about the hardest working folks in my towm .
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 9:49:59 AM EST

Originally Posted By 9mm4me:
There is one that has to be a front near me. It is a very high end place in a nice part of town. Always a bunch of really really expensive cars parked there and no one in sight when you go in. I mean super empty. I think there must be some kind of high stakes gaming going on in the basement.


The barber shop I goto is like that pretty sure its some sort of laundering front for the russian mob, but he gives good cheap haircuts so I keep going. Never a wait and sometimes while I'm getting my haircut people will walk in and walk through to a door in the back of the shop.

Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:07:27 AM EST

Originally Posted By popsmrf:
ever think they are a front for some sort of chineese mafia. they open and close everyday in the strangest locations. a few around my house, the buffet type, hardly ever have any business but yet stay open.



using business like a restaurant as a front for gambling is a possibilty

the front room might have a small grocery store / soda shop and the back room might
have a gambling table / card room, etc
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:09:51 AM EST

Originally Posted By macman37:
Can't trust those pesky chineese, with their tasty food and attractive women!
+Wonton

The place by my house has a waitress that looks like a doll, and always has a faint aroma of lotus oil. I love her. I must have her.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:15:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By Mateba:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.


Damn, that logic ruins a good tinfoil theory every time.

I remember in the 80s, everybody was scratching their head how the Vietnamese famillies who came here with nothing started making a decent living. The welfare leeches couldn't believe it was possible and would start stupid theories about how we were taking part in organized crime. All was bogus of course, neither my family nor any other Vietnamese family I knew of, ever provided for themselves by doin anything but hard work. My dad worked 50 hrs a week as a janitor to provide for us and put himself through college. We never took any kind of welfare or aid of any kind. Families that ran restaurants and convenience stores had the whole family working around the clock.

Those strange locations is part of what keeps costs down. Along with manning the businesses with your family, that's what allows them to make money even when business is low.


newstandardnews.net/content/index.cfm/items/2753

In the same spirit that the Vietamese rebuilt their homes & neighborhoods after Katrina and said to hell with waiting on FEMA and .gov.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:20:48 AM EST
The hardest working people I've ever known was a Vietnamese family. (the daughter was hot as heck and in my history class) They showed up after the fall of Saigon with exactly one change of clothes each. Only a couple of the kids spoke English. The local Catholic church put them up for about 2 months.

The father and mother bought a cast net and caught and sold bait while the kids were in school. When the kids got home from school they also caught bait. Within a year they were catching shrimp and crabs for restaurants. Three years later mom and dad owned/operated a shrimp boat and was paying for daughter's college.

Last I heard of them about 6 years ago, Mom and dad was surrounded by grandkids, in the seafood shipping business and operating a commercial ice plant.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:23:39 AM EST
In general no, but there is this one joint that only accepts cash. No checks, no credit cards, just cash. This makes me think they are mobbed up, as ever other Chinese resturant takes credit cards.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:26:23 AM EST
Another excuse to post a pics of my new kitty.

Kung-Pow kitty is gonna fuck you up!


Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:28:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By Mateba:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.


Damn, that logic ruins a good tinfoil theory every time.

I remember in the 80s, everybody was scratching their head how the Vietnamese famillies who came here with nothing started making a decent living. The welfare leeches couldn't believe it was possible and would start stupid theories about how we were taking part in organized crime. All was bogus of course, neither my family nor any other Vietnamese family I knew of, ever provided for themselves by doin anything but hard work. My dad worked 50 hrs a week as a janitor to provide for us and put himself through college. We never took any kind of welfare or aid of any kind. Families that ran restaurants and convenience stores had the whole family working around the clock.

Those strange locations is part of what keeps costs down. Along with manning the businesses with your family, that's what allows them to make money even when business is low.


And it's a mystery why a minority group that has been here in the states for several hundred years has still not risen up out of the ghetto in many cases, and yet the Vietnamese came here going on 30 years ago and are very successful for the most part.

A story I have about a Vietnamese refugee: I went on deployment several years ago with a man who fled Vietnam (as a 12 year old) when the North invaded the South. His mother pushed him and his brothers & sisters up over the top of a barge that was ready to depart the beach with many people packed on it. The tow boat took them out to sea and left them, set them adrift with little food or water. Tran told me that people were passing out and falling down into the bottom of the barge and drowning in the water, puke, shit & piss. Finally after several days adrift a US Navy ship rescued the remaining survivors and took them to a refugee camp somewhere in Thailand I believe, where their mother finally caught up to them. They all eventually made it to the states and have prospered over the years. Tran told me that the reason he joined the Navy Reserves many years ago was in appreciation for what the Navy did when rescuing them all.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:39:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By IBU-14_Gunner:

Originally Posted By Mateba:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.


Damn, that logic ruins a good tinfoil theory every time.

I remember in the 80s, everybody was scratching their head how the Vietnamese famillies who came here with nothing started making a decent living. The welfare leeches couldn't believe it was possible and would start stupid theories about how we were taking part in organized crime. All was bogus of course, neither my family nor any other Vietnamese family I knew of, ever provided for themselves by doin anything but hard work. My dad worked 50 hrs a week as a janitor to provide for us and put himself through college. We never took any kind of welfare or aid of any kind. Families that ran restaurants and convenience stores had the whole family working around the clock.

Those strange locations is part of what keeps costs down. Along with manning the businesses with your family, that's what allows them to make money even when business is low.


And it's a mystery why a minority group that has been here in the states for several hundred years has still not risen up out of the ghetto in many cases, and yet the Vietnamese came here going on 30 years ago and are very successful for the most part.

A story I have about a Vietnamese refugee: I went on deployment several years ago with a man who fled Vietnam (as a 12 year old) when the North invaded the South. His mother pushed him and his brothers & sisters up over the top of a barge that was ready to depart the beach with many people packed on it. The tow boat took them out to sea and left them, set them adrift with little food or water. Tran told me that people were passing out and falling down into the bottom of the barge and drowning in the water, puke, shit & piss. Finally after several days adrift a US Navy ship rescued the remaining survivors and took them to a refugee camp somewhere in Thailand I believe, where their mother finally caught up to them. They all eventually made it to the states and have prospered over the years. Tran told me that the reason he joined the Navy Reserves many years ago was in appreciation for what the Navy did when rescuing them all.


was he ethnic Chinese? I heard the name Tran is actualy Chan in Chinese? I know another guy named Trang but his real name in Chinese is Chang but he was born in Saigon
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:45:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By Johninaustin:
The hardest working people I've ever known was a Vietnamese family. (the daughter was hot as heck and in my history class) They showed up after the fall of Saigon with exactly one change of clothes each. Only a couple of the kids spoke English. The local Catholic church put them up for about 2 months.

The father and mother bought a cast net and caught and sold bait while the kids were in school. When the kids got home from school they also caught bait. Within a year they were catching shrimp and crabs for restaurants. Three years later mom and dad owned/operated a shrimp boat and was paying for daughter's college.

Last I heard of them about 6 years ago, Mom and dad was surrounded by grandkids, in the seafood shipping business and operating a commercial ice plant.


Sounds like the story of my family. Fled China when it fell to communism. Once you realize that no one owes you shit, don't accept handouts from the government and hard work pays off, you can go places. My grandfather had a crappy life and never went on wellfare so that they could buy land. But it wasn't about them, it was about their future generations (me). Standing on their shoulders makes me feel like a giant, and it is comforting to know that my kids will be supported by my shoulders as well. Me becomming a bum would be the greatest disrespect to my parents who kicked ass for me.

God bless America!!!
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:45:41 AM EST
A friend of mine works for VDOT & he says they deliver the road kill they pick up to the Chinese restraunt every Thursday.

Mike
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:52:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By BillTheButcher:

Originally Posted By IBU-14_Gunner:

Originally Posted By Mateba:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.


Damn, that logic ruins a good tinfoil theory every time.

I remember in the 80s, everybody was scratching their head how the Vietnamese famillies who came here with nothing started making a decent living. The welfare leeches couldn't believe it was possible and would start stupid theories about how we were taking part in organized crime. All was bogus of course, neither my family nor any other Vietnamese family I knew of, ever provided for themselves by doin anything but hard work. My dad worked 50 hrs a week as a janitor to provide for us and put himself through college. We never took any kind of welfare or aid of any kind. Families that ran restaurants and convenience stores had the whole family working around the clock.

Those strange locations is part of what keeps costs down. Along with manning the businesses with your family, that's what allows them to make money even when business is low.


And it's a mystery why a minority group that has been here in the states for several hundred years has still not risen up out of the ghetto in many cases, and yet the Vietnamese came here going on 30 years ago and are very successful for the most part.

A story I have about a Vietnamese refugee: I went on deployment several years ago with a man who fled Vietnam (as a 12 year old) when the North invaded the South. His mother pushed him and his brothers & sisters up over the top of a barge that was ready to depart the beach with many people packed on it. The tow boat took them out to sea and left them, set them adrift with little food or water. Tran told me that people were passing out and falling down into the bottom of the barge and drowning in the water, puke, shit & piss. Finally after several days adrift a US Navy ship rescued the remaining survivors and took them to a refugee camp somewhere in Thailand I believe, where their mother finally caught up to them. They all eventually made it to the states and have prospered over the years. Tran told me that the reason he joined the Navy Reserves many years ago was in appreciation for what the Navy did when rescuing them all.


was he ethnic Chinese? I heard the name Tran is actualy Chan in Chinese? I know another guy named Trang but his real name in Chinese is Chang but he was born in Saigon


I never heard him mention that he was anything but Vietnamese. His full name that I knew him by was Thong Tran, but I think that may have been an abreviation.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:53:47 AM EST
Has somebody else been reading Andrew Vachss' novels?
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 10:56:07 AM EST
There are four Chineese restaurants in my city of 20,000 people. They are all pretty good places to eat.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 11:03:19 AM EST

Originally Posted By mstem:
A friend of mine works for VDOT & he says they deliver the road kill they pick up to the Chinese restraunt every Thursday.

Mike






Roadkill delivery day is Tuesday.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 11:08:37 AM EST
Wow! two misspelled words in the title of the thread. Arfcommers are about the poorest spellers of any forum I frequent.
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 11:10:51 AM EST
I only know 2 vietnamese dudes.

Both are way more educated than I.

Both have WAY cooler gun collections than I.

Both are as generous as can be if you ever needed anything, especially trigger time with their toys.


But I can drink them both under the table.

TXL
Link Posted: 10/9/2007 11:49:54 AM EST

Originally Posted By IBU-14_Gunner:

Originally Posted By BillTheButcher:

Originally Posted By IBU-14_Gunner:

Originally Posted By Mateba:

Originally Posted By shootemup:
I'd hate to say it, but Chinese are some of the hardest workers I've seen.


I've also noticed that I've never seen too many homeless one either.

So no, they are probably not mafia. More than likely the whole family is living in the back or the basement.


Damn, that logic ruins a good tinfoil theory every time.

I remember in the 80s, everybody was scratching their head how the Vietnamese famillies who came here with nothing started making a decent living. The welfare leeches couldn't believe it was possible and would start stupid theories about how we were taking part in organized crime. All was bogus of course, neither my family nor any other Vietnamese family I knew of, ever provided for themselves by doin anything but hard work. My dad worked 50 hrs a week as a janitor to provide for us and put himself through college. We never took any kind of welfare or aid of any kind. Families that ran restaurants and convenience stores had the whole family working around the clock.

Those strange locations is part of what keeps costs down. Along with manning the businesses with your family, that's what allows them to make money even when business is low.


And it's a mystery why a minority group that has been here in the states for several hundred years has still not risen up out of the ghetto in many cases, and yet the Vietnamese came here going on 30 years ago and are very successful for the most part.

A story I have about a Vietnamese refugee: I went on deployment several years ago with a man who fled Vietnam (as a 12 year old) when the North invaded the South. His mother pushed him and his brothers & sisters up over the top of a barge that was ready to depart the beach with many people packed on it. The tow boat took them out to sea and left them, set them adrift with little food or water. Tran told me that people were passing out and falling down into the bottom of the barge and drowning in the water, puke, shit & piss. Finally after several days adrift a US Navy ship rescued the remaining survivors and took them to a refugee camp somewhere in Thailand I believe, where their mother finally caught up to them. They all eventually made it to the states and have prospered over the years. Tran told me that the reason he joined the Navy Reserves many years ago was in appreciation for what the Navy did when rescuing them all.


was he ethnic Chinese? I heard the name Tran is actualy Chan in Chinese? I know another guy named Trang but his real name in Chinese is Chang but he was born in Saigon


I never heard him mention that he was anything but Vietnamese. His full name that I knew him by was Thong Tran, but I think that may have been an abreviation.


Tran is a common Vietnamese first/middle name. Tran as a last name is also common. IIRC it has roots from China but that's if you go back a few hundred years. Nobody would consider you "Chinese" in Vietnam if you had that name. There is a large Chinese population in Saigon though in the Cho Long (sp?) district.
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