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Posted: 3/22/2017 3:16:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/22/2017 5:47:39 PM EST by a555]
For clarification, I mean that you had something go wrong or did something stupid that put your aircraft down somewhere you didn't initially intend to. Landing a medical helicopter or a bush plane out in the field doesn't count. Likewise, if you lost control at an airport and crashed or ventured off the runway, it did. Poll inbound.

Edited for title clarification.
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 3:19:55 PM EST
Had a piston blow on departure, made it back to the field.
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 3:31:56 PM EST
Almost, but no.

I was in the Army, on our way from Central America to North Carolina on a C141.

Along the way two engines failed. Air Force tells us, "at the first sign of trouble with another engine, we need to lose a lot of weight (You Guys)".

We where going to jump when we got to NC, so we had parachutes. We got our gear on, and listened for the emergency bail out alarm, it never came.

So, not only did we not get to bail out into who knows where, but, when we did get home we didn't even get to jump because they wanted to get the plane on the ground fast as possible.

I realize now that this is actually the complete opposite of what OP asked for sorry.

L
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 3:32:37 PM EST
Had a nose gear collapse in a Duchess once.
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 5:02:45 PM EST
In a field next to Wal Mart in Raeford.

In a Chinook

Link Posted: 3/22/2017 5:13:54 PM EST
Do rotor blades through trees and lots of holes in a helicopter count?

Also please more accurately define the term "crash".
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 5:46:30 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Morgan321:
Do rotor blades through trees and lots of holes in a helicopter count?

Also please more accurately define the term "crash".
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Not the same as the NTSB/FAA definition. Technically a forced landing due to an engine failure in a field where there's no damage is not an accident, but for the case of this thread, it is.

Incident involving putting the airplane down in a controlled or uncontrolled manner somewhere that either resulted in damage to the airplane or from conditions that merited immediate termination of the flight. Engine quits at 8000 ft and you glide to an airport with no damage to the airplane, that counts. Attempting to land and you ground loop, that counts too. Diverting due to weather or low fuel doesn't count; landing on a road due to low fuel or weather, that counts unless you're in Alaska and it's SOP.
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 5:58:15 PM EST
What about touching the ground with parts that are not supposed to touch the ground and you keep flying?
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 6:06:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/22/2017 6:10:20 PM EST by a555]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Morgan321:
What about touching the ground with parts that are not supposed to touch the ground and you keep flying?
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You mean like this? I'll count that in, but you better post a story to go along with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgdSflSCTQM
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 7:48:19 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By a555:


You mean like this? I'll count that in, but you better post a story to go along with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgdSflSCTQM
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Not sure how he kept the props off the pavement.
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 8:33:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/28/2017 7:10:36 AM EST by u-baddog]
Arecibo Airport, Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Jump master was Harry O'Connor. Years later he would go on to be famous in the jump world.

I dropped out of the sky from 1500ft straight into the wing of a beautiful Piper twin engine Comanche.

I was able to run atop one wing hop/dragged over the fuselage drop on the other wing then was dragged/jumped down to the tarmac to complete my PLF.
I was hanging under a T10 chute so steering wasn't an option.
Technically I did crash into the plane and that's not were I was supposed to land.
Link Posted: 3/22/2017 10:26:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/22/2017 10:39:26 PM EST by Vne]
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Originally Posted By Him:
Not sure how he kept the props off the pavement.
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Originally Posted By Him:
Originally Posted By a555:


You mean like this? I'll count that in, but you better post a story to go along with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sgdSflSCTQM
Not sure how he kept the props off the pavement.
He didn't. He flew home with q-tipped blades. When that video was originally posted here I thought it included pics of the blades.

Eta: here it is...

Attachment Attached File
Link Posted: 3/23/2017 12:38:04 AM EST
Had a connecting rod come apart in a Cessna and had to set her down on the beach. Luckily it was a cold day (for Florida) and the beach was empty or it would have been the water instead.




Link Posted: 3/23/2017 12:47:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/24/2017 11:33:08 PM EST by llanero]
Not GD, my bad.
Link Posted: 3/23/2017 1:14:27 AM EST
I've had four incidents that required immediate unplanned landings. Only one where I thought that making a runway was in question. One of those was a medical emergency. Several more incidents where I landed with fewer engines running on landing than when I took off. Incidentally every engine failure I've ever had has been in a twin (freight dogging for the win.) A very near engine failure in a PC-12 was one of my immediate unscheduled stops and my only serious engine mechanical failure with a turbine in flight. Also my closest call in ice was at 0400 in a PC-12 after a nearly 24 hour day.

Recently a buddy of mine parked a 210 on a road in some of the least hospitable places to land a plane after the engine grenaded. Even the NTSB said he was impressed.
Link Posted: 3/23/2017 7:13:48 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ARAMP1:
Had a connecting rod come apart in a Cessna and had to set her down on the beach. Luckily it was a cold day (for Florida) and the beach was empty or it would have been the water instead.


http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m163/aramp1/Flying/Beach%20Landing_zpsmybnsddy.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m163/aramp1/Flying/Engine%20Failure_zpsxwpphk16.jpeg
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Super clean low hour engine. Suspiciously new gaskets.
Link Posted: 3/23/2017 7:38:33 PM EST
My two major engine failures resulted in making it back to the runway, one was just barely.

I did, however, bury two UAVs while I was in Afghanistan. One ended up in an Afghan Colonel's back yard instead of the wadi.
Link Posted: 3/23/2017 8:50:35 PM EST
Declared and diverted for equipment failure (vacuum failed/panel lights failed) in IMC at night.  The only mechanical problem that necessitated an early return was a fuel selector valve that began leaking when the student switched tanks.
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 11:49:17 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/24/2017 11:55:26 AM EST by a555]
This was mine. It was post maintenance. Engine quit on takeoff at 200ft due to FOD going through the #4 cylinder. Really glad I declined the intersection departure that day. I wrote the plane off in my head immediately, pulled power in case it decided to come back to life, stood on the rudder, threw the gear down to help slow down and ended up not bending any metal. The Mooney did well off-road. I took the pics with my iPhone so the depth of field may be a bit misleading. The field was a terraced run-off field and I bet I was within 40 yards of the neighborhood when I finally stopped.

My reason for the thread was that I'm curious how often things happen that you just never hear about because the news doesn't catch it and metal doesn't bend. In other words, how much riskier is night/single-engine IFR/wet feet flying?



Link Posted: 3/24/2017 12:19:53 PM EST
Had to return to the departure airport after the cabin failed to pressurize on a CJ3. Unfortunately had a full load of pax and lots of fuel, so had to circle for 30 mins to get down to landing weight. Had a newborn on board, so was very glad I caught it early (before the masks dropped and mass panic ensued) and was able to descend at a slow rate to protect ears.

Lost cabin pressure after maintenance in another Citation Jet, wound up with the mask in my hand before I realized I'd even reached for it, haha.

A few other issues here and there, but nothing dramatic that required off-airport landing.
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 1:06:59 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By ARAMP1:
Had a connecting rod come apart in a Cessna and had to set her down on the beach. Luckily it was a cold day (for Florida) and the beach was empty or it would have been the water instead.


http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m163/aramp1/Flying/Beach%20Landing_zpsmybnsddy.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m163/aramp1/Flying/Engine%20Failure_zpsxwpphk16.jpeg
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Did you ever find the rest of the connecting rod?



Seriously though, wow. Ive never seen an engine fail that bad.
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 2:03:44 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/24/2017 2:04:19 PM EST by redfish86]
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Originally Posted By ARAMP1:
Had a connecting rod come apart in a Cessna and had to set her down on the beach. Luckily it was a cold day (for Florida) and the beach was empty or it would have been the water instead.


http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m163/aramp1/Flying/Beach%20Landing_zpsmybnsddy.jpg

http://i104.photobucket.com/albums/m163/aramp1/Flying/Engine%20Failure_zpsxwpphk16.jpeg
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You're lucky they didn't lock you up for landing out there on that beach. They can be a little....picky


Nice job in that sand BTW.
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 2:16:42 PM EST
Mu uncle crashed into the North Sea in 1943 ... does that count?
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 2:25:18 PM EST
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Originally Posted By 12a10:
My uncle crashed into the North Sea in 1943 ... does that count?
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Link Posted: 3/24/2017 5:38:14 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Knightzone:


Did you ever find the rest of the connecting rod?



Seriously though, wow. Ive never seen an engine fail that bad.
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Originally Posted By Knightzone:


Did you ever find the rest of the connecting rod?



Seriously though, wow. Ive never seen an engine fail that bad.
LOL. I think there were chunks of metal scattered all along the beach. There were several pieces and chunks that weren't found.

Originally Posted By redfish86:



You're lucky they didn't lock you up for landing out there on that beach. They can be a little....picky


Nice job in that sand BTW.
The county was the first LE on the scene. They were straight up dicks. Well, the old crusty sgt was a dick. The younger partner was okay. They really were hostile with me for "tampering with their crime scene" ie retrieving my pilot's license from inside the cockpit when talking to the FAA. After the park ranger got there and took over the sheriff dept left and things were cool. When the FAA finally got there, they were awesome too. The investigator complemented me on my landing. I told her I've had much worse.
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 9:02:30 PM EST
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Originally Posted By ARAMP1:

LOL. I think there were chunks of metal scattered all along the beach. There were several pieces and chunks that weren't found.


The county was the first LE on the scene. They were straight up dicks. Well, the old crusty sgt was a dick. The younger partner was okay. They really were hostile with me for "tampering with their crime scene" ie retrieving my pilot's license from inside the cockpit when talking to the FAA. After the park ranger got there and took over the sheriff dept left and things were cool. When the FAA finally got there, they were awesome too. The investigator complemented me on my landing. I told her I've had much worse.
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Conversely the two accidents I've worked with the FAA they were huge dicks the whole time.

1st time was when we pulled my mentor dead out of his 150. The inspector talked shit about him for 20 minutes as he was laying next to us under a sheet.

2nd time I was the first week on the job with my employer and another crew had a mechanical issue that caused them to depart the runway. I got a rash of shit from the inspectors for policies and practices I knew nothing about.
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 9:52:45 PM EST
My dad had one in a cub in 1946 , I work as a kid for a guy who had 3 2 in experimental planes and 1 in a gyrocopter . I have been lucky in my limited world
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 9:58:45 PM EST
Only with a parachute.

Pie
Link Posted: 3/24/2017 10:43:53 PM EST
<---Never in mine, but...

...I've flown many Aero Commanders across all models, in various states of restoration or (dis)repair and had hydraulic failures, electrical failures, engine failures and all were non-events. 

I did have one hydraulic failure that resulted in a nose gear collapse at about 5kts, at the conclusion of my roll-out. It just went "ka-chunk" and sat. Bent one gear door and scratched the paint on it. I think we spent about 3 hours repairing it and off we went.

I also had the same indication (hyd. failure followed by no green light for the nose gear) at Oakland, and when I told the tower, they rolled all the trucks. The nose wheel turned out to be locked, but I got a nice welcome from all the guys in their trucks with the spinny lights, lining the runway .

/TCP
Link Posted: 3/25/2017 6:37:18 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/25/2017 6:38:44 AM EST by QUIB]
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Originally Posted By CFII:
In a field next to Wal Mart in Raeford.

In a Chinook

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LOL!!!

The Adidas factory in Germany.

In an OH-58.
Link Posted: 3/25/2017 11:04:49 AM EST
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Originally Posted By a555:
This was mine. It was post maintenance. Engine quit on takeoff at 200ft due to FOD going through the #4 cylinder. Really glad I declined the intersection departure that day. I wrote the plane off in my head immediately, pulled power in case it decided to come back to life, stood on the rudder, threw the gear down to help slow down and ended up not bending any metal. The Mooney did well off-road. I took the pics with my iPhone so the depth of field may be a bit misleading. The field was a terraced run-off field and I bet I was within 40 yards of the neighborhood when I finally stopped.

My reason for the thread was that I'm curious how often things happen that you just never hear about because the news doesn't catch it and metal doesn't bend. In other words, how much riskier is night/single-engine IFR/wet feet flying?

http://www.usfbs.com/UserData/a555/Images/201703240444038790.jpg
http://www.usfbs.com/UserData/a555/Images/20170324044403.jpg
http://www.usfbs.com/UserData/a555/Images/20170324044402.jpg
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It happens a lot more than you'd think given how little makes the news. There's a nationwide 24/7 telcon called the Domestic Events Network that connects the whole NAS and people report all the events their aware of. At certain times we are required to monitor it and I was amazed at how many incidents occur and that was just the aircraft who use the system. A lot of VFR guys with no radios probably run into issues that go unreported
Link Posted: 3/25/2017 11:34:07 AM EST
Landed in between parallel runways. A weird crosswind likely from a microburst sent us into the dirt area. We were landing when the sudden crosswind hit. Had already pulled back power and were about 6 feet from the ground. It was an instant hard push to the left and we were then dropped into the ditch area.

Rode it out and back onto a taxiway. Just went along like nothing happened. ATC didn't even make a peep about it. My underwear was a different story
Link Posted: 3/25/2017 3:47:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By esa17:
My two major engine failures resulted in making it back to the runway, one was just barely.

I did, however, bury two UAVs while I was in Afghanistan. One ended up in an Afghan Colonel's back yard instead of the wadi.
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I made a 200 foot long debris field near Spin Boldak with one 
Link Posted: 3/27/2017 7:42:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/27/2017 7:46:28 PM EST by fp1201]
Myself no, but five of my friends that ALL were much older, very experienced Pilots crashed and only one died as a result....kinda made me think there are only two kinds of small airplanes: those that have crashed and those that haven't yet.
Link Posted: 3/27/2017 7:54:31 PM EST
Engine swap in exhaust valve, landed safely at an unintended destination. Also lost a Magneto another time and lost all my electrical well I was trying to figure it out. Landed at the nearest airport, not the one I meant to
Link Posted: 3/27/2017 11:46:10 PM EST
I copied and pasted this from an archived thread, but it's my one "off airport landing" story.



I had to look it up in my logbook, February of 1987. It was my second hour of multi-engine dual, in a Beech Duthcess. We were up in the practice area near Baraboo, I was flying simulated instrument under the hood. My instructor shut the fuel off to one of the engines, to simulate an engine failure. I did the emergency drill, and feathered the prop. When we did the restart checklist, the prop unfeathered, but the engine didn't restart.

For a bunch of reasons, my instructor believed the engine was making partial power, even thigh it was still inoperative. The item of highest drag on a multi-engine airplane is a windmilling propellor. We turned back towards Madison, and he called our "company" (long since out of business, used to be the big, blue hangar on the south ramp) and the boss told him to be sure and get the plane back home. At that point, the die was cast for the rest of the days events.

The airplane would not maintain altitude on the good engine, with the prop windmilling, so we were in a gentle descent the whole way back. We made it to about six miles form the Madison airport when we realized we were never going to make the runway. We landed with the gear down, in a frozen, plowed field. The airplane stayed upright, but the prop on the operating engine got the tips bent when it hit a mound of silage.

They flew it out of the field, and back to MSN that day. My instructor got what was called a "709 ride" or an emergency recertification check. Since I was not rated in multi-engine airplanes at the time, the FAA left me alone.

Let's just say I learned a bunch of things that day.
Link Posted: 3/28/2017 7:11:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/28/2017 7:52:35 AM EST by razerface]
put my weedhopper down in a cornfield when the fuel pump quit. Thankfully the corn was only knee high and the prop was already stopped.

I landed a quicksilver in a cow pasture when i noticed my sunglasses hanging off the strut, out of my reach. I didn't want them to go thru the prop,,they were prescription!

Don't know if these count as I land in fields and misc grass places a lot anyway.

edit: my only experience with feds was when a friend touched the river with quicksilver wheels, it flipped and drowned him. I went with them to get the plane out of the river and evaluate.
Link Posted: 3/28/2017 7:27:06 AM EST
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Originally Posted By fp1201:
Myself no, but five of my friends that ALL were much older, very experienced Pilots crashed and only one died as a result....kinda made me think there are only two kinds of small airplanes: those that have crashed and those that haven't yet.
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Lol the mechanic who inspires confidence!
Link Posted: 3/28/2017 10:44:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/28/2017 10:46:54 PM EST by Corey]
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Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
I copied and pasted this from an archived thread, but it's my one "off airport landing" story.



I had to look it up in my logbook, February of 1987. It was my second hour of multi-engine dual, in a Beech Duthcess. We were up in the practice area near Baraboo, I was flying simulated instrument under the hood. My instructor shut the fuel off to one of the engines, to simulate an engine failure. I did the emergency drill, and feathered the prop. When we did the restart checklist, the prop unfeathered, but the engine didn't restart.

For a bunch of reasons, my instructor believed the engine was making partial power, even thigh it was still inoperative. The item of highest drag on a multi-engine airplane is a windmilling propellor. We turned back towards Madison, and he called our "company" (long since out of business, used to be the big, blue hangar on the south ramp) and the boss told him to be sure and get the plane back home. At that point, the die was cast for the rest of the days events.

The airplane would not maintain altitude on the good engine, with the prop windmilling, so we were in a gentle descent the whole way back. We made it to about six miles form the Madison airport when we realized we were never going to make the runway. We landed with the gear down, in a frozen, plowed field. The airplane stayed upright, but the prop on the operating engine got the tips bent when it hit a mound of silage.

They flew it out of the field, and back to MSN that day. My instructor got what was called a "709 ride" or an emergency recertification check. Since I was not rated in multi-engine airplanes at the time, the FAA left me alone.

Let's just say I learned a bunch of things that day.
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I took a picture of that hanger as we were taxing back to it last Saturday. The one with the big red letters on the front that spell C-E-S-S-N-A? (Though I realize that Cessna is not out of business, but this hanger meets that description, maybe it preceded Cessna being there.)

Glad you both walked away. We were flying hard IMC in a single engine (my neighbor is a pilot, I am aspiring). I am becoming more and more convinced that two engines are the way to go, but they are just unobtainable for me at this point. And me and my family have flown a number of IMC flights in singles.
Link Posted: 3/29/2017 9:18:19 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Corey:


I took a picture of that hanger as we were taxing back to it last Saturday. The one with the big red letters on the front that spell C-E-S-S-N-A? (Though I realize that Cessna is not out of business, but this hanger meets that description, maybe it preceded Cessna being there.)

Glad you both walked away. We were flying hard IMC in a single engine (my neighbor is a pilot, I am aspiring). I am becoming more and more convinced that two engines are the way to go, but they are just unobtainable for me at this point. And me and my family have flown a number of IMC flights in singles.
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Most light twins lack the single engine performance to be useful. Twice the cost; twice the fuel burn; twice the risk of failure (or maybe it's just sour grapes).

I do my best to avoid IMC, but I file IFR frequently for ATC oversight and so I don't have to worry about maintaining VFR minimums. I could see where in the Midwest where you'd be stuck on the ground without flying in IMC with the duration of your overcast systems. I'm in Florida and down here we get plenty of VMC weather and the IMC may contain huge buildups that you don't see. Our "local" hazard that may catch a pilot from another area of the country is that storms can build up incredibly quickly (< 5 minutes from clear sky to an "oh fuck no" buildup) and the insides of our clouds can become much more violent than expected. If the weather at my destination isn't looking great, I'll drive or take a commercial flight, which thrills my girlfriend. She was with my when I had my engine failure and even though she found the incident terrifying, she was a real bitch at the airport, complaining about TSA and having to "take the bus" back home.


Link Posted: 3/29/2017 1:58:26 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
I copied and pasted this from an archived thread, but it's my one "off airport landing" story.



I had to look it up in my logbook, February of 1987. It was my second hour of multi-engine dual, in a Beech Duthcess. We were up in the practice area near Baraboo, I was flying simulated instrument under the hood. My instructor shut the fuel off to one of the engines, to simulate an engine failure. I did the emergency drill, and feathered the prop. When we did the restart checklist, the prop unfeathered, but the engine didn't restart.

For a bunch of reasons, my instructor believed the engine was making partial power, even thigh it was still inoperative. The item of highest drag on a multi-engine airplane is a windmilling propellor. We turned back towards Madison, and he called our "company" (long since out of business, used to be the big, blue hangar on the south ramp) and the boss told him to be sure and get the plane back home. At that point, the die was cast for the rest of the days events.

The airplane would not maintain altitude on the good engine, with the prop windmilling, so we were in a gentle descent the whole way back. We made it to about six miles form the Madison airport when we realized we were never going to make the runway. We landed with the gear down, in a frozen, plowed field. The airplane stayed upright, but the prop on the operating engine got the tips bent when it hit a mound of silage.

They flew it out of the field, and back to MSN that day. My instructor got what was called a "709 ride" or an emergency recertification check. Since I was not rated in multi-engine airplanes at the time, the FAA left me alone.

Let's just say I learned a bunch of things that day.
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Ouch. Failed to feather the prop. Did your instructor pass his 709 ride?
Link Posted: 3/29/2017 8:18:36 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Senoj:
Ouch. Failed to feather the prop. Did your instructor pass his 709 ride?
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Originally Posted By Senoj:
Originally Posted By Dr_Nimslow:
I copied and pasted this from an archived thread, but it's my one "off airport landing" story.



I had to look it up in my logbook, February of 1987. It was my second hour of multi-engine dual, in a Beech Duthcess. We were up in the practice area near Baraboo, I was flying simulated instrument under the hood. My instructor shut the fuel off to one of the engines, to simulate an engine failure. I did the emergency drill, and feathered the prop. When we did the restart checklist, the prop unfeathered, but the engine didn't restart.

For a bunch of reasons, my instructor believed the engine was making partial power, even thigh it was still inoperative. The item of highest drag on a multi-engine airplane is a windmilling propellor. We turned back towards Madison, and he called our "company" (long since out of business, used to be the big, blue hangar on the south ramp) and the boss told him to be sure and get the plane back home. At that point, the die was cast for the rest of the days events.

The airplane would not maintain altitude on the good engine, with the prop windmilling, so we were in a gentle descent the whole way back. We made it to about six miles form the Madison airport when we realized we were never going to make the runway. We landed with the gear down, in a frozen, plowed field. The airplane stayed upright, but the prop on the operating engine got the tips bent when it hit a mound of silage.

They flew it out of the field, and back to MSN that day. My instructor got what was called a "709 ride" or an emergency recertification check. Since I was not rated in multi-engine airplanes at the time, the FAA left me alone.

Let's just say I learned a bunch of things that day.
Ouch. Failed to feather the prop. Did your instructor pass his 709 ride?
Sounds like he did feather it successfully thinking the engine was still fine but then brought it back out of feather to start the engine back up and continue training. I'm assuming that engine had an accumulator. But once back in low pitch the engine wouldn't start. By that time the accumulator had been used, there was no more oil pressure in the prop hub due to a failed engine, and so they lacked the ability to refeather.

I'm guessing the 709 ride was largely due to the instructors inability to diagnose whether or not the engine was producing power but even more importantly, for making the classic mistake of allowing the schmuck on the ground to tell the schmuck in the air how to fly the plane. He should have landed immediately at the nearest suitable airfield, Baraboo. But instead he risked their lives trying to appease the boss and in so doing ended up in the field.

I'm kinda shocked he bothered to contact the boss at all during that. Aviate, navigate, communicate. Instructor should've called the boss after he was parked on the ramp at Baraboo.
Link Posted: 3/29/2017 8:27:28 PM EST
Not as bad as these people.

Link Posted: 3/29/2017 8:30:58 PM EST
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They were fools to ever try to leave. Should've planned on staying put and focused their energies on repopulating the island. There was enough genetic diversity to last them a very long time.
Link Posted: 3/30/2017 2:51:33 PM EST
If Harrison Ford is a member here, maybe he'll chime in.
Link Posted: 4/2/2017 4:14:57 PM EST
Not yet, but I'm a glider pilot, so basically destine for an off field landing someday.
Lucky for us, it's no big deal
Link Posted: 4/16/2017 9:30:46 AM EST
Single engine recip:
One off field
Two made it to an airport
Twin recip:
One reject below V1
Two inflight- landed at destination
Twin turboprop
Two inflight shutdowns
Jet
One failure during rotation
One during climb out
Both were return to departure airport
A couple of failures well below V1, so non events
Link Posted: 4/17/2017 8:00:14 PM EST
I have had an engine failure at 500' agl after take off in a grumman. Not a fond memory.

I am far more worried about medical emergencies while flying solo or as the sole pilot aboard. Loss of consciousness for any reason would be fatal.
Link Posted: 4/18/2017 8:50:08 PM EST
Several times.
Bird strike, faulty gauge readings, chip lights, control servos going bad...

Better to land the helicopter now where I want than have it crash where it wants!
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