Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Posted: 9/22/2005 8:36:35 AM EDT
This may be a naive question, but here goes:

Can y'all not find some back roads to get out of town on?

Seriously, do you HAVE to take the interstate to leave town?



Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:37:19 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:42:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
This may be a naive question, but here goes:

Can y'all not find some back roads to get out of town on?

Seriously, do you HAVE to take the interstate to leave town?




Taking the back roads simply doesn't occur to most people.




I figure that with enough fuel (which may be a problem for many evacuees) I could get from here to Colorado without having to get on the interstate.

Call me crazy.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:49:57 AM EDT
The news media isn't showing any footage of the sideroads/backroads so we don't know for sure if they are not full also.

TXDOT and the other .gov rescue agencies will only bring fuel to you if you are on one of the official evac routes.

BigDozer66
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:04:45 AM EDT
U.S. 90a is a parking lot as well. All the back roads are full, there are little things called maps, I'm sure everyone who is smart brought one with them.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:07:17 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:11:08 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Combatvet:
U.S. 90a is a parking lot as well. All the back roads are full, there are little things called maps, I'm sure everyone who is smart brought one with them.




What about the FM roads, are they shitty now too?

The first rule of Bug Out is: no one talks about Bug Out!

The second rule of Bug Out is: no one talks about Bug Out!

The third rule of Bug Out is: stay off the main roads.

The fourth rule of Bug Out is: bug out before everyone else does.

The fifth rule of Bug Out is: have enough fuel to get to your destination.

The sixth rule of Bug Out is: if someone goes limp, taps out... the Bug Out is over.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:16:57 AM EDT
Back roads have been plugged since midnight or so. Immobile.

Miserable and a bad idea because:

back roads = no gas stations=no running the engine=no AC

among other reasons I'm sure you can figure out for yourself.

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:23:29 AM EDT

Originally Posted By THR-Thumper:
Back roads have been plugged since midnight or so. Immobile.

Miserable and a bad idea because:

back roads = no gas stations=no running the engine=no AC

among other reasons I'm sure you can figure out for yourself.




I've never had to get out of the way of an impending natural disaster.

On the handful of occassions that I've needed to get to the site of such a disaster, I've been able to use backroads to get in.

I just wondered if that worked both ways. I guess it doesn't.

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 9:32:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Gloftoe:
Reports from around Houston via the local talk shows here in Austin say that lots of back roads are packed full too. There are just too many people for the roads.



No shit we don't have the infrastructer to shift huge amounts of population from A to B. Look at Houston on a good day.

I just hope their not still on the road when the winds kickup.

(Not directed at parent)
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:03:22 PM EDT
Does Texas have a county road system? Some states (WI, MN?) have county roads which run N-S and E-W every mile or so. It's a perfect grid and I suspect a lot of cars could flow over that sort of grid.

GunLvr
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:07:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
Does Texas have a county road system? Some states (WI, MN?) have county roads which run N-S and E-W every mile or so. It's a perfect grid and I suspect a lot of cars could flow over that sort of grid.

GunLvr



Nope

nothing resembling a grid here.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:14:55 PM EDT
We have backroads and county roads, I live near alot of them. They are all full just like the interstate is. There is just that many people trying to get out. I dont know if any of you have ever been to the Houston area, but it is really BIG. There is a SHITLOAD of people in the area. Plus everyone from Galveston has to go through there to get out too, as well as many other towns.


Good luck fellow Texans!!

Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:27:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By napalm:

Originally Posted By Combatvet:
U.S. 90a is a parking lot as well. All the back roads are full, there are little things called maps, I'm sure everyone who is smart brought one with them.




What about the FM roads, are they shitty now too?

The first rule of Bug Out is: no one talks about Bug Out!

The second rule of Bug Out is: no one talks about Bug Out!

The third rule of Bug Out is: stay off the main roads.

The fourth rule of Bug Out is: bug out before everyone else does.

The fifth rule of Bug Out is: have enough fuel to get to your destination.

The sixth rule of Bug Out is: if someone goes limp, taps out... the Bug Out is over.



That's the funniest shit I've read in a while.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:30:13 PM EDT
There are plenty of 'back roads' to take in Texas. Some are not even on current maps.

Its knowing where to go and when. If you try to leave in a situation like this at the last minute....then you are forced to stay on the main roads and they won't let you exit. Period.
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 8:40:35 PM EDT
Considering there are at least 3 million vehicles in the Houston/Galveston area, giving each car 25 feet of road means 14,205 MILES of cars. 8 lanes of I-10 from Houston to Seguin takes care of 1400 miles. 8 lanes of I-45 from Houston to Dallas takes care of 1800 miles of cars.

US 290 from Houston to Austin only takes care of about 800 miles. US 59 another 1500 miles.

Just using the major highways would require at least 36 hours, given all of the inefficiency associated with non-professional drivers.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:10:34 AM EDT
This may sound kinda odd, but seeing as there are so many trucks and SUVs out there, and you'd think people would be kinda motivated to not DIE due to 145mph winds, that some folk would you know, be using the offroad capabilities of said trucks and SUVs? Get off the roads, and hit the dirt as they say.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:16:42 AM EDT
from going north on 45 I think from nasa rd 1 the sign said exits closed for 100miles
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:33:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2005 8:31:50 AM EDT by Combatvet]
I had family just arrive here after spending 26 hours on "back roads".
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:37:47 AM EDT

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
This may be a naive question, but here goes:

Can y'all not find some back roads to get out of town on?

Seriously, do you HAVE to take the interstate to leave town?


You'd be amazed at the number of people who only know one or two ways in or out of a particular location. I see it all the time at accidents when roads have to be shut down and traffic redirected.There was a study done a few years ago that looked into how people found their way around from place to place in a new environment; the study found that it takes years for a person to acclimate themselves to familiarizing themselves with a new environment to the point to where they know those multiple points of egress.Given that the average American is moving something like every 5 or 6 years now, a lot of people have minimal geographical knowledge of their areas.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:43:35 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Combatvet:
I'm sorry but you are uneducated and your question is moronic. I had family just arrive here after spending 26 hours on "back roads". So now I ask you, have you removed your head from your ass yet?



glad you made it ok, I'm going to stay
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:50:31 AM EDT
Texas is a very large state, plenty of space and roads. But, 75% of the population of Texas lives along the I35 corridor. That is really a very small area. There is not near enough roads to handle that kind of traffic.

A good start would be the Trans Texas Corridor ...Fullclip
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:53:11 AM EDT
The problem with the back roads in my area is that eventually you will have to get on a main artery , if not but for a half mile or so and then hit another back road. Mainly at river crossings and when driving across the main arteries.

My brother was trying to get to Wallis from Rosenberg yesterday( approx 25 miles) to tie in a generator with a double throw switch for the city of Wallis. It took over an hour to get there using all the back roads and then driving on parts of 36 and 90 on the shoulder pisssin off all the refugees, but WTF. My glock and My AR, they comfort me.

It is like Christmas morning here nothin open, no gas, with people pulled into parking lots out of gas.

The big problem as I see it was when the storm went to 185 mph winds and looked to be headed straight for matagorda. This scared the shit out of people and the whole covey busted at once instead of flushing ones or twos, every one said oh fuck and left at once.

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:59:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tc556guy:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:
This may be a naive question, but here goes:

Can y'all not find some back roads to get out of town on?

Seriously, do you HAVE to take the interstate to leave town?


You'd be amazed at the number of people who only know one or two ways in or out of a particular location. I see it all the time at accidents when roads have to be shut down and traffic redirected.There was a study done a few years ago that looked into how people found their way around from place to place in a new environment; the study found that it takes years for a person to acclimate themselves to familiarizing themselves with a new environment to the point to where they know those multiple points of egress.Given that the average American is moving something like every 5 or 6 years now, a lot of people have minimal geographical knowledge of their areas.



Yes, there are a number of sheep who only know one or two ways in or out. There are also say, one in ten who have an extensive knowledge of the area.

One in ten in a city of this size is more than enough to completely choke your back roads. Also, people DID try to leave early. This evac started as soon as it looked like it might come this way.

One thing I've become convinced of: If you're in a metro area and you have a family, you'd better find a way of bugging in.

No gas available. Zero. A full tank in stop and go traffic should last you forever, right? Nope. A normal 3 1/2 hour drive lasted 24 for those LUCKY enough to find more gas and used what they had intelligently. The rest are on the side of the road right now.

New vehicles failed due to conditions.

Your survival acumen may be strong, but your sense of security is false. Write that down.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:04:05 AM EDT

Originally Posted By THR-Thumper:

Your survival acumen may be strong, but your sense of security is false. Write that down.



I have to admit that ina similar situation, I know enough truly back roads that I could get my family out of my own county by any number of back roads, including trails that aren't even on the map. Once out of my county though, I would be as limited in my back rodas knowledge as the next Joe with the AAA map on his wifes lap.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:09:14 AM EDT
really!?
most people can not read a map if their life depended on it
NO PUN INTENDED!

yes one could find back a back road, TEXAS are full of them
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:15:31 AM EDT
Whats causing the backups? Cant they take helicopters along the freeways and see what is causing the cluster fuck and deal with it? i mean, i understand about the sheer volume of traffic but having lived in houston for 20 years, it has to be something along the line, a chokepoint or something, that is the cause
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:19:32 AM EDT

most people can not read a map if their life depended on it
NO PUN INTENDED!



I agree. Fully 90%.

Do you think 10% of Houston's population is enough to choke every outbound path in the area? Hint: It is.

Also, guess what happens to the available gas supply when everyone in SE Texas gasses up on Wednesday?

But nevermind...you probably would have been fine.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:23:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2005 4:24:03 AM EDT by THR-Thumper]
Interestingly, the early exodus is part of the problem. Everyone left early and at once.

The small town of Columbus has 4000 stranded cars in the area and no gas.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:27:34 AM EDT
One more important thing to add.

The national news isn't covering this, but residents along the highways are taking time from their own hurricane preps to bring food, water, and ice to stranded motorists.

Teens walking around with ice chests full of water handing it out, people allowing strangers into their homes to use the bathroom, take a nap (it's really gridlocked), whatever...

I love this state.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:32:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By THR-Thumper:
One more important thing to add.

The national news isn't covering this, but residents along the highways are taking time from their own hurricane preps to bring food, water, and ice to stranded motorists.

Teens walking around with ice chests full of water handing it out, people allowing strangers into their homes to use the bathroom, take a nap (it's really gridlocked), whatever...

I love this state.



Only in TEXAS. I love this state.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:45:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Diss_ipator:
Only in TEXAS. I love this state.


You find good people anywhere in times of crisis.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:50:42 AM EDT
The road infrastructure was funded, designed and built to handle the 90 percentile daily needs under normal circumstances. I don't think that there is a major metropolitan area in the U.S. that can come close to handling a sudden exodus of 90% of the population in 48 hours. The key to avoiding getting stuck in such a jam is to leave very early - not when officials get around to telling you that it is time.

CWO
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:55:15 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2005 4:56:06 AM EDT by THR-Thumper]

The key to avoiding getting stuck in such a jam is to leave very early - not when officials get around to telling you that it is time.


Many of these people left on Wednesday. Under the existing conditions that day, the equivalent would be you leaving MD when a CAT 2 storm was threatening Southern VA or Carolina. Would you?
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:56:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Diss_ipator:

Originally Posted By GunLvrPHD:
Does Texas have a county road system? Some states (WI, MN?) have county roads which run N-S and E-W every mile or so. It's a perfect grid and I suspect a lot of cars could flow over that sort of grid.

GunLvr



Nope

nothing resembling a grid here.




At least not in that part of Texas.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:57:17 AM EDT
Two things.
1. Have a new up to date extensive road atlas.
2. Buy a 20 or 30 gal polypropolyne boat gas tank to carry spare fuel. West Marine.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 4:59:20 AM EDT

Originally Posted By fullclip:
But, 75% of the population of Texas lives along the I35 corridor.



Where did this stat come from???

Also, Texas has very good roads overall (funded by taxes on fuel)... our state roadways are superior to most others I have traveled on. Texas has many farm roads that are the equal of interstate highways in other states... (Kansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, New Mexico)
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 5:01:20 AM EDT
Watching the news, I noticed that they still hadn't done the "both sides of the freeway out" thing yet (I know there's a name for it, can't think of it off the top of my head).

Have they done this yet? Seems like a simple way to double your capacity.

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 5:04:19 AM EDT

Watching the news, I noticed that they still hadn't done the "both sides of the freeway out" thing yet (I know there's a name for it, can't think of it off the top of my head).


Called contraflow. Your "news" is about 24 hours out of date.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 5:04:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 5:25:50 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By jcncc:
Two things.
1. Have a new up to date extensive road atlas.
2. Buy a 20 or 30 gal polypropolyne boat gas tank to carry spare fuel. West Marine.

I'll go one better. Have a boat. I wonder how crowded the waterways are?



I'm thinking of building a very small lightweight AL bugout trailer. Put 15 inch tires on it so it tows nice. Build in a fuel tank and water resistant storage compartment.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 6:11:36 AM EDT
I only lived in TX for 2.5 years (army brat near Ft. Hood). I can't remember anyone having a basement or storm cellar to take refuge in.


Seems as long as you didn't have flooding or earthquakes, a stormcellar might be a good ticket for bugging in?

But I'm still new to bugging around allthough I did survive a few hurricanes when I lived in Hawaii. =)
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 6:15:45 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Combatvet:
I'm sorry but you are uneducated and your question is moronic. I had family just arrive here after spending 26 hours on "back roads". So now I ask you, have you removed your head from your ass yet?

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 6:41:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 6:46:53 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By jcncc:
Two things.
1. Have a new up to date extensive road atlas.
2. Buy a 20 or 30 gal polypropolyne boat gas tank to carry spare fuel. West Marine.

I'll go one better. Have a boat. I wonder how crowded the waterways are?


I imagine being on the water during a hurricane has to suck a bit.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 6:48:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 6:50:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By tc556guy:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By jcncc:
Two things.
1. Have a new up to date extensive road atlas.
2. Buy a 20 or 30 gal polypropolyne boat gas tank to carry spare fuel. West Marine.

I'll go one better. Have a boat. I wonder how crowded the waterways are?


I imagine being on the water during a hurricane has to suck a bit.

I imagine so. What about before the hurricane, when your goal is to end up a few hundred miles inland and the freeways are stopped?




It would take, what, maybe 3-6 hours to get COMPLETELY out of the hurricane's path?



OTOH, if your boat broke down, you'd be royally screwed.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 7:07:49 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 7:08:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By arowneragain:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By tc556guy:

Originally Posted By DoubleFeed:

Originally Posted By jcncc:
Two things.
1. Have a new up to date extensive road atlas.
2. Buy a 20 or 30 gal polypropolyne boat gas tank to carry spare fuel. West Marine.

I'll go one better. Have a boat. I wonder how crowded the waterways are?


I imagine being on the water during a hurricane has to suck a bit.

I imagine so. What about before the hurricane, when your goal is to end up a few hundred miles inland and the freeways are stopped?




It would take, what, maybe 3-6 hours to get COMPLETELY out of the hurricane's path?



OTOH, if your boat broke down, you'd be royally screwed.

How would that be worse than running out of gas on a clogged freeway?



On the freeway, you can walk, or bum a ride.

A mile or two out in the gulf, you're limited as to what options you have for getting out of the storm's way.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 7:14:06 AM EDT
the delay on the interstate is probably due to the old people driving in the left lane with the right turn signal on

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 7:14:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2005 7:15:21 AM EDT by DoubleFeed]
Arrow Left Previous Page
Page / 2
Top Top