Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/12/2005 3:30:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2005 3:38:20 AM EDT by vito113]
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 7:52:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:
Record satellite lift for Ariane

Ariane 5 launched the heaviest commercial satellite to date

The heaviest commercial communications satellite to go into orbit has been successfully launched from Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.
The Thaicom 4 (Ipstar) craft, operated by Thailand's Shin Satellite, will provide net access across Asia-Pacific.

The 6.5-tonne satellite beats the previous heaviest telecoms satellite which was the Anik F2 satellite.

Thaicom 4 (Ipstar) was launched into orbit by an Ariane 5-Generic rocket, operated by Arianespace.

The launch from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Kourou spaceport in South America on Thursday (0520 local time in Kourou, 0820 GMT) marks the 18th successful mission for the standard Ariane 5-Generic launcher.

It had originally been scheduled for 12 July, but was postponed for technical reasons by Arianespace.

The $400m satellite, which was lifted into GTO (Geostationary Transfer Orbit), should have a life expectancy of 12 years.

The European company, Arianespace, currently dominates the satellite launch business globally with its Ariane 5-Generic rockets, which can deliver about six tonnes to orbit.

Commercial telecommunications satellites tend to orbit Earth at distances of about 36,000km. Satellites in GTOs are in-between LEO (Low Earth Orbit) and GEOs (Geostationary Orbit).

They travel an elliptical orbit along the Equatorial plane until they get to GEO. Satellites in a GEO follow Equatorial orbits to match Earth's rotation so they have "fixed" locations in order to send steady signals.


Click here to see the Ariane 5G vs ECA
Arianespace's family of launchers also includes the Ariane 5-ECA craft, a beefed-up version of the Ariane 5-Generic, capable of lifting much heavier loads into space.


The Thaicom 4 satellite will provide net and telecoms services across Asia
The ECA can substantially reduce the costs of launching spacecraft from between $30-40,000 a kg to $15-20,000 a kg.

This is because the rocket can deliver several satellites at once, taking a maximum of 10 tonnes into orbit. (It can also lift 21 tonnes into Low Earth Orbit)

The ECA, considered to be the "workhorse" for Europe's launchers industry, last launched in February, carrying an eight-tonne payload into space.

That was its first flight since its disastrous maiden outing in 2002, when the rocket was destroyed as it veered out of control over the ocean.

Growing demand

The commercial satellite industry has been slowly recovering from a slump in businesses.

An industry report by the International Space Business Council released this week said that government and commercial sales should reach $158bn by 2010, up from $103bn in 2004.


The report said that government funding for space is on the rise, and that commercial orders for satellites and launches have rebounded.

It reported that new exploration initiatives were being pursued and that there was general "excitement" surrounding new businesses around radio, broadband and space tourism.

Part of the recovery has been down to more demand for satellite radio, satellite TV, as well as GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) services and systems.

Some older satellites which are currently in space are also reaching the end of their life cycles, so will need replacing. Improving technologies have extended the life time of satellites.

More than $18bn a year is being spent globally by governments and businesses on space systems. India and China had also successfully developed their independent space systems, which also boosted demand.

tinypic.com/adi3df.gif

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/4142088.stm


Ariane 5

The European Ariane 5 is the launcher for the Automated Transfer Vehicle, which will be used for the transportation of mixed cargo items to and from the ISS.

tinypic.com/adi613.jpg



Andy, you know what the Ariane 5 ECA and the Airbus A-400 have in common?


They`re still not flying!
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 8:05:23 AM EDT
I know GE Aerospace used the Araines ALOT for their commercial satelites back in the late 80s/early 90s.

They worked pretty well as long as the French techs didn't leave dirty rags in the engines.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 9:26:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 9:28:11 AM EDT
Good for them. They figured out how to do it right. There is yet another thread in GD about evolution.......
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 9:33:10 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2005 10:00:20 AM EDT by HeavyMetal]
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 9:56:38 AM EDT
What's the Falcon series? Linkies, please.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 10:00:02 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 10:05:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By vito113:

Originally Posted By arbob:
Originally Posted By vito113:


Andy, you know what the Ariane 5 ECA and the Airbus A-400 have in common?


They`re still not flying!



Both fly… the shuttle has been grounded again…

ANdy



Yep. THE space shuttle.
As in, THE space shuttle built by the United States.
Also see, THE only space shuttle to fly manned missions in space.

And Europe is not a country. Yet.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 10:44:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2005 10:45:26 AM EDT by 37Victor]
It's OK. As long as we still dominate the satellite shoot-down market.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 10:53:44 AM EDT
I imagine Lockheed or Boeing will make a new heavy lift vehicle sooner or later. Satelites will need to get bigger to handle more jobs at once. There's only so much geosync sky availible.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 11:02:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 11:07:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:

Yep. THE space shuttle.
As in, THE space shuttle built by the United States.
Also see, THE only space shuttle to fly manned missions in space.

And Europe is not a country. Yet.



Well, in terms of 'firsts', it's to be noted that the Russians have so far made the only successful orbital flight and landing by a fully automatic and unmanned reusable shuttle.

It's pedanticism though, the Buran is now even more dead than the US shuttle. (The hangar collapsed onto it!)

NTM
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 4:33:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/12/2005 4:34:31 PM EDT by arbob]

Originally Posted By vito113:

Originally Posted By arbob:
Originally Posted By vito113:


Andy, you know what the Ariane 5 ECA and the Airbus A-400 have in common?


They`re still not flying!



Both fly… the shuttle has been grounded again…

ANdy



The frogs successfully launched the cryogenic upper stage on the Ariane 5? I hadn`t heard that. If so, I stand corrected. The Ariane 5 was supposed to take 2 satellites to GTO, it still hasn`t done that. The Airbus A 400 airlifter is only flying in artist`s conceptions.
Link Posted: 8/12/2005 4:41:35 PM EDT




Link Posted: 8/12/2005 4:49:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SmilingBandit:
I imagine Lockheed or Boeing will make a new heavy lift vehicle sooner or later. Satelites will need to get bigger to handle more jobs at once. There's only so much geosync sky availible.



Next month Boeing and Lockheed Martin will join forces to build the Atlas V and the Delta IV rockets in the same plant. We now build Delta IV and Delta II in the Decatur Alabama plant that I work in.

After the transition we will be known as United Launch Alliance. I will still refer to myself as a Boeing employee because after all, who ever heard of ULA?

Our Delta IV heavy has had a sucessful launch with a dummy payload. Our only customer at this time is the Air Force and other government agencies. The commercial market is almost non existant.
Top Top