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Posted: 8/21/2015 4:44:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/29/2015 12:44:33 AM EDT by Weezer]
I've worked as a paramedic for years in a busy system, but decided the grass must be greener. So I accepted a job as an RN in an ICU. I like the idea of working in critical care, and the pay is better hourly, but it's 3 twelve hour midnight shifts, no guaranteed overtime. As a paramedic I work two 24 hour shifts a week (8 days a month) and bring home more money because of the built in weekly overtime, and pay less babysitter expenses as well.

Everyone I talk to tells me I'm crazy for leaving the ICU, but after 6 months, I've found its just not for me.

Anyone else ever leave an otherwise good job because they just weren't happy?

Update:

I returned to life on the road as a paramedic for now. Working 8 days a month, making more than I did as an RN, and doing something I really enjoy.
:)
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 4:57:39 AM EDT
Yeah, my job, that I've been in for over 18 years. I put in my 2 weeks Monday, next Thursday is my last day at noon I take my last 12 hrs of vacation. Out of 4 weeks vacation per year, I've  been taking random days off trying to hold on but I cant. I hate every minute of it. I don't even have a well thought out course of action.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 4:57:39 AM EDT
My wife's an RN and did the 3/4 twelves thing for many years, she's a clinical supe now, have you thought about being a traveler?
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:03:17 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Crimson_Glory:
My wife's an RN and did the 3/4 twelves thing for many years, she's a clinical supe now, have you thought about being a traveler?
View Quote



I guess I've never really thought about it because I have a family. But I'll look into it.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:08:55 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:



I guess I've never really thought about it because I have a family. But I'll look into it.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By Crimson_Glory:
My wife's an RN and did the 3/4 twelves thing for many years, she's a clinical supe now, have you thought about being a traveler?



I guess I've never really thought about it because I have a family. But I'll look into it.



The money is really good and you get a housing stipend, that doesn't mean you need to travel hundreds of miles away, I had a client that was a traveler that worked her shifts and still went home and not only made a shit ton of money being a traveler, but she also paid most of her mortgage with the stipend.  Are you looking for something more active or are you just bored of hospital work in general?
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:12:48 AM EDT
I'm not sure exactly why I'm unsettled. I guess one of the issues is I'm not used to being stuck in a small space for 12 hours with constant interaction with people. There seems to be a lot more of a sense of freedom working as a paramedic.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:15:03 AM EDT
Do what makes you happy.  I have a friend that was a Paramedic for 8 years and went to nursing.  He works in the ICU with me now and I think he misses the field work from what he says.  I know he makes more money but he works 4 and 5 days a week 12hr shifts when 3 days would equal what he was making as a Paramedic.  Is it the work or the environment you aren't enjoying?  My saying is "Wash, Rinse, Repeat" when it comes to nursing.  My friend that was a Paramedic saying is, "Long term management of a lifetime of bad choices".  

Is there any Daytime shifts you could transfer to?  Working nights can suck for some people, especially with a family.  I know I've been on nights the last 3 1/2 years.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:17:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 5:21:33 AM EDT by Crimson_Glory]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:
I'm not sure exactly why I'm unsettled. I guess one of the issues is I'm not used to being stuck in a small space for 12 hours with constant interaction with people. There seems to be a lot more of a sense of freedom working as a paramedic.
View Quote



Well yea, there would be, plus you're jumping from one call to another. Have you thought about the E.D.? Unless you're living in a high crime area most of the time hospitals are boring as shit.

edit:

And, another thing, boring jobs that make you a lot of money allow you to do fun shit to make up for it. I had to remind my wife of this many times.

Look for days, way more action and you can be with your peeps during normal hours.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:22:02 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Crimson_Glory:



Well yea, there would be, plus you're jumping from one call to another. Have you thought about the E.D.? Unless you're living in a high crime area most of the time hospitals are boring as shit.
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Originally Posted By Crimson_Glory:
Originally Posted By Weezer:
I'm not sure exactly why I'm unsettled. I guess one of the issues is I'm not used to being stuck in a small space for 12 hours with constant interaction with people. There seems to be a lot more of a sense of freedom working as a paramedic.



Well yea, there would be, plus you're jumping from one call to another. Have you thought about the E.D.? Unless you're living in a high crime area most of the time hospitals are boring as shit.



Well, I do live near Detroit, and I suppose that would qualify as high crime lol

Maybe I'll look into a trauma center environment. Maybe that's it. I'm just bored
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:22:42 AM EDT
How much school did you invest in the switch from EMT-P to RN?



What are your long term prospects as an EMT-P versus RN? What are the limits on each?






Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:25:04 AM EDT
Haven't done so but have been thinking of leaving my job of 18 years as it is a damn lunatic asylum.  The ONLY thing that is preventing me from doing so is  knowing that if I get laid off I'll get at least a years severance and that is the payout I am waiting for.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:27:13 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 5:34:47 AM EDT by TheAvatar9265ft]
You are getting insanely good paramedic pay and/or insanely shitty RN pay.

You pay out at 208 equivalent hours (overtime adjusted) as a P per month vs 144 RN hours? If you make $15/hr as a medic, you'd have to only make $21/hr as an RN to have that math work out.

I make 2x per hour as an RN as I would on a well paid EMS spot. You should be making $25-35/hr as an RN in your city + differentials. Maybe your low pay is because you are a brand new RN vs an experienced medic? Your RN pay will rise rapidly once you have some experience.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:31:07 AM EDT
Do what makes you happy. Jobs like that aren't worth it if you don't enjoy it. Too much stressful shit.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:32:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 5:34:30 AM EDT by Weezer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:
You are getting insanely good paramedic pay and/or insanely shitty RN pay.

You pay out at 208 equivalent hours (overtime adjusted) as a P per month vs 144 RN hours? If you make $15/hr as a medic, you'd have to only make $21/hr as an RN to have that math work out.

I make 2x per hour as an RN as I would on a well paid EMS spot. You should be making $25-35/hr as an RN in your city. Maybe your pay diff is because you are a brand new RN vs an experienced medic? Your RN pay will rise rapidly once you have some experience.
View Quote


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:37:12 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 5:38:08 AM EDT by TheAvatar9265ft]
17 is good for a medic. 25/hr is alright for a RN with less than a year of experience... but median for RNs is more like 31 for your area.
I make $7/hr more after 2 years than what I started at.

If your ICU is boring, and a lot of community hospital ICUs are boring, got to a more acute unit once you have some experience. You can try the ED... better for ADD EMS types but same acuity variability issue you saw on the bus.

Seriously, go find a trauma ICU!
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:46:05 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.
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Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:
You are getting insanely good paramedic pay and/or insanely shitty RN pay.

You pay out at 208 equivalent hours (overtime adjusted) as a P per month vs 144 RN hours? If you make $15/hr as a medic, you'd have to only make $21/hr as an RN to have that math work out.

I make 2x per hour as an RN as I would on a well paid EMS spot. You should be making $25-35/hr as an RN in your city. Maybe your pay diff is because you are a brand new RN vs an experienced medic? Your RN pay will rise rapidly once you have some experience.


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.



You're getting ginked on your pay, does that include night dif. ?
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:51:07 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:
You are getting insanely good paramedic pay and/or insanely shitty RN pay.

You pay out at 208 equivalent hours (overtime adjusted) as a P per month vs 144 RN hours? If you make $15/hr as a medic, you'd have to only make $21/hr as an RN to have that math work out.

I make 2x per hour as an RN as I would on a well paid EMS spot. You should be making $25-35/hr as an RN in your city. Maybe your pay diff is because you are a brand new RN vs an experienced medic? Your RN pay will rise rapidly once you have some experience.


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.


Damn, that's not great.  My wife (RN) was making $35/hr in MO (not one of the big cities either) and $50/hr in Hawaii.  A lot of travel nursing gigs (especially strike busting) will pay $50/hr+ and all expenses, she has done a few of them.   Even in MI I imagine you can make a good bit more than that as an RN, once you have experience and diversity of experience.  My wife has worked ER, ICU (Neuro and others), OB/GYN, etc.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 5:58:20 AM EDT
I plan to quit my job asap. I just want to get another job lined up first, but was seriously tempted to put in notice tonight without any ducks in a row.

I've thought about getting into an RN position in the past. One of the things that really seemed interesting to me would be on the "life flight" helicopters. I'm sure there is more training for it, and few positions available, but I think it could be an interesting job.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 6:16:35 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By rbread:
I plan to quit my job asap. I just want to get another job lined up first, but was seriously tempted to put in notice tonight without any ducks in a row.

I've thought about getting into an RN position in the past. One of the things that really seemed interesting to me would be on the "life flight" helicopters. I'm sure there is more training for it, and few positions available, but I think it could be an interesting job.
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Jobs are like women, it's easier to find a new one if you still have the old one.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 6:35:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 6:37:58 AM EDT by SouthHoof]


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Originally Posted By Weezer:





$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN





What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.
View Quote



I always (mistakenly) thought RN's made more $$ than what you describe.  For perspective, I was making $30/hr + OT as a telco switching system tech in rural northern Michigan before I retired a year ago.





Just talked to my wife (work for D.O.C).  She says nurses within the MI dept of corrections make $28-$30/hr + $5k sign on bonus to start.  Nurses at Duane Waters Hosp over in Jackson make more.  Contract/travel nurses make more still with travels as needed to other facilities.  Check online at the D.O.C. website for openings if you are interested.





I can tell you this, from what she describes, working the clinics & hospitals within the D.O.C. can be exciting at times.  The trade off is that feeling of freedom.





 
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 6:48:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 6:54:42 AM EDT by 444]
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Originally Posted By Weezer:
I'm not sure exactly why I'm unsettled. I guess one of the issues is I'm not used to being stuck in a small space for 12 hours with constant interaction with people. There seems to be a lot more of a sense of freedom working as a paramedic.
View Quote


I work as a paramedic and have for about 30 years. Over the years I have worked with lots of people who were either RNs or worked in a hospitals in some capacity and they quit and came back to EMS. This is far more common than people who leave EMS to go work in a hospital.

At my last job, this was a no-brainer since we made significantly more than an RN. But here where I work now, we make similar money (working more hours to get it) and people still leave nursing for EMS.
It takes a certain type of person to make EMS a career. That type of person usually doesn't adapt well to wotking as an RN for a variety of reasons
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 6:57:10 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By 444:


I work as a paramedic and have for about 30 years. Over the years I have worked with lots of people who were either RNs or worked in a hospitals in some capacity and they quit and came back to EMS. This is far more common than people who leave EMS to go work in a hospital.

At my last job, this was a no-brainer since we made significantly more than an RN. But here where I work now, we make similar money (working more hours to get it) and people still leave nursing for EMS.
It takes a certain type of person to make EMS a career. That type of person usually doesn't adapt well to wotking as an RN for a variety of reasons
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Originally Posted By 444:
Originally Posted By Weezer:
I'm not sure exactly why I'm unsettled. I guess one of the issues is I'm not used to being stuck in a small space for 12 hours with constant interaction with people. There seems to be a lot more of a sense of freedom working as a paramedic.


I work as a paramedic and have for about 30 years. Over the years I have worked with lots of people who were either RNs or worked in a hospitals in some capacity and they quit and came back to EMS. This is far more common than people who leave EMS to go work in a hospital.

At my last job, this was a no-brainer since we made significantly more than an RN. But here where I work now, we make similar money (working more hours to get it) and people still leave nursing for EMS.
It takes a certain type of person to make EMS a career. That type of person usually doesn't adapt well to wotking as an RN for a variety of reasons


Paramedics here don't make shit, hence the reason why many transition to RN.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 7:02:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 7:27:42 AM EDT by 444]
What paramedics make is often misunderstood. You can tell when people look at hourly rates of pay. And then directly compare that to an RN.

I have never worked anywhere as a medic where I didnt work at least 48 hours a week (two shifts) and spent my career working a base of 56 hours a week.

Here where I work now, I work two 24s a week which gives mr 16 hours of time and a half every paycheck. Almost everybody else here works three shifts a week for 60 hours of time and a half every paycheck
.
In addition to the two 24s, I work a 12 hour shift on Sunday nights at another different  agency where the odds are good that I will sleep all night . So I work 60 hours a week. But, I get Monday Wednesday Friday Saturday off and Sunday during the day off.

As I said, you work more hours to get it. But the hours are packaged differently from what most people are used to


FWIW: I retired and get a pension, but then moved and immediately started working 60 hours a week.
Dont ever underestimate the other guys greed. .
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 7:32:37 AM EDT
I thought thread said "ejaculating in a nurse". This thread disappoints.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 7:37:10 AM EDT
Do you have a bachelors? If so, go to anesthesia school. You'll get paid twice as much as a RN and your whole job is to render and keep people unconscious, so you don't have to deal with their shit.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 7:41:31 AM EDT
Move down here...my wife is an RN-C at the local hospital which is so busy they are paying an extra $12.50/hr for extra shifts.  She picked up a few extra on weekends and at night, was bringing home $43/hr.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 7:41:58 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.
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Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:
You are getting insanely good paramedic pay and/or insanely shitty RN pay.

You pay out at 208 equivalent hours (overtime adjusted) as a P per month vs 144 RN hours? If you make $15/hr as a medic, you'd have to only make $21/hr as an RN to have that math work out.

I make 2x per hour as an RN as I would on a well paid EMS spot. You should be making $25-35/hr as an RN in your city. Maybe your pay diff is because you are a brand new RN vs an experienced medic? Your RN pay will rise rapidly once you have some experience.


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.



Well I have got to admit you made me feel better about what I do for what I get paid after seeing those numbers but if I had to pick between the two I would take the 17 there aint no way I could stand to be a RN in an icu  How about a school nurse. with summers off.

That 8 hard days a month deal is still to hard to pass up .  I know there is a recovery time after some of those shifts but you could have a second job and still have time off.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:37:44 AM EDT
Could you rearrange your lifestyle to accommodate offshore work? There are positions for medics on oil rigs both offshore and onshore,  and ships, and odd places like Kwajalein.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:40:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 9:40:31 AM EDT by hardcorps1775]
Whatever you do God bless you.  Nurses and EMT's do God's work.  Best of luck in whatever you decide!
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:41:53 AM EDT
Keep your license current.

RNs cannot be outsourced.  Medical skill is never out of fashion; especially in a declining economy.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:45:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Weezer:
I've worked as a paramedic for years in a busy system, but decided the grass must be greener. So I accepted a job as an RN in an ICU. I like the idea of working in critical care, and the pay is better hourly, but it's 3 twelve hour midnight shifts, no guaranteed overtime. As a paramedic I work two 24 hour shifts a week (8 days a month) and bring home more money because of the built in weekly overtime, and pay less babysitter expenses as well.

Everyone I talk to tells me I'm crazy for leaving the ICU, but after 6 months, I've found its just not for me.

Anyone else ever leave an otherwise good job because they just weren't happy?

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WIth your ICU experience, you could go back to school and become a CRNA and then really make bank with a decent lifestyle
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:47:34 AM EDT
Former medic here, I say go back to EMS full-time and pick up 12s PRN as an RN.  I know a few guys that still do that and make great bank.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:47:39 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 4v50:
Keep your license current.

RNs cannot be outsourced.  Medical skill is never out of fashion; especially in a declining economy.
View Quote


They crank them out by the tens of thousands in the PI and other countries, and good old H1B visas will assure you they can and will be outsourced.  Plenty of shithead hospitals that have ten LPNs and one poor RN per floor, too.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:48:08 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By Weezer:
Well, I do live near Detroit, and I suppose that would qualify as high crime lol



Maybe I'll look into a trauma center environment. Maybe that's it. I'm just bored
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Originally Posted By Weezer:



Originally Posted By Crimson_Glory:


Originally Posted By Weezer:

I'm not sure exactly why I'm unsettled. I guess one of the issues is I'm not used to being stuck in a small space for 12 hours with constant interaction with people. There seems to be a lot more of a sense of freedom working as a paramedic.






Well yea, there would be, plus you're jumping from one call to another. Have you thought about the E.D.? Unless you're living in a high crime area most of the time hospitals are boring as shit.






Well, I do live near Detroit, and I suppose that would qualify as high crime lol



Maybe I'll look into a trauma center environment. Maybe that's it. I'm just bored
Would be my suggestion.  My wife is an A-EMT. Any medical environment other than her current would have to be trauma and busy or she would go nuts.  She has considered bridging over for her RN after she completes medic (whenever she does that) simply because of the pay differential.  Is a pretty substantial difference around here.  But I also remind her how nuts she would go being confined to pt care on a floor for 12 hours.

 
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:51:12 AM EDT
Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:53:32 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.
View Quote View All Quotes
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By TheAvatar9265ft:
You are getting insanely good paramedic pay and/or insanely shitty RN pay.

You pay out at 208 equivalent hours (overtime adjusted) as a P per month vs 144 RN hours? If you make $15/hr as a medic, you'd have to only make $21/hr as an RN to have that math work out.

I make 2x per hour as an RN as I would on a well paid EMS spot. You should be making $25-35/hr as an RN in your city. Maybe your pay diff is because you are a brand new RN vs an experienced medic? Your RN pay will rise rapidly once you have some experience.


$17/hr as a paramedic, $25/hr as an RN

What makes the difference is the mandatory one extra shift a month. So one week a month I work a third shift, all overtime.


Damb that seems low my best friend is a respiratory therapist and he's making 28 for normal time. I know the hospitals here are busier during the winter, will you be able to pick up some OT shifts come winter time?
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:57:34 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 9:59:14 AM EDT by Weezer]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By runcible:
Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
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I guess you didn't read my post before responding.

And how would that be messed up anyways?

Having gone through both paramedic and RN programs, and working both jobs, I would say that there is more critical thinking and fewer resources on the paramedic side.

And to answer your question, I live in Michigan, just like it says there under my user name.

I hope you're not a detective
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:58:02 AM EDT
Or take the nurse anesthetist route.  I believe PAs also do some sort of anesthesia training.  I could be wrong.  It seems like PAs specialize in several areas now.  I remember hearing of an ortho residency for new PAs that paid around 40k/yr.  I think it was a 2 year gig.  In practice you can make pretty good coin.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 9:58:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 10:00:40 AM EDT by NavyDoc1]
Requirements for CRNA school:

  Bachelor's degree with an upper division nursing major from a program accredited by the National League for Nursing (NLNAC) or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing education (CCNE); or an Associate/Diploma degree in Nursing from an accredited program with a bachelor's degree in another field (RN to MSN Pathway)

Completion of application for admission, including copies of all post-secondary educational transcripts.

The bachelor's or post-bachelor's course work must include satisfactory completion of a course in descriptive and inferential statistics.

Basic Life Support; Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) certification & Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) certification.

Cumulative undergraduate grade point average of 3.0 or higher (4.0 scale) or evidence of outstanding graduate academic achievement.

Completion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) within five years of application (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing sections) with scores available before October 15 (Early Decision deadline) or December 1 (Priority Application deadline). GRE scores are required and cannot be waived.

Personal interview (by invitation) with members of the Nurse Anesthesia Admissions Committee will be offered to qualified applicants. Applicants selected for interview are usually notified mid to late March via e-mail notification followed by a personal letter. We use e-mail as our primary means of communication; consequently, please ensure your e-mail address is current with the Office of Admissions and Student Services. We do not always follow all e-mail communications with a letter or phone contact; therefore, please select a reliable e-mail provider.

The applicant must have a minimum of one year (two years preferred) current, continuous full-time acute care experience as a registered nurse in a critical care setting which offers the applicant an opportunity to develop as an independent decision-maker capable of using and interpreting advanced monitoring techniques based on their knowledge of physiological and pharmacological principles. Adult acute care experience offering on interpretation and use of advanced monitoring, care of ventilated patients, pharmacologic hemodynamic management, and independent decision making is preferred.

CCRN certification is strongly encouraged.                      
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  According to 2013 data the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the average annual salary for CRNAs is over $60,000 higher than the yearly earnings for a nurse practitioner. 2013 Average Salaries for CRNAs, NPs and RNs. CRNAs: $157,690.
NPs: $95,070.    
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Link Posted: 8/21/2015 10:01:01 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By runcible:


Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
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After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....



Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 10:02:59 AM EDT
Whatever works for you works for you.

I was a Licensed Land Surveyor and went back to school to be an RN.

Best job I've ever had.

One advantage to nursing is the numerous different jobs in the field.

I got tired of patient care after 10 years and have been doing QA for the last 8 years.

Now I'm the QA/IT RN for the company I work for.

Work from home as I please and travel from office to office as I decide it's required.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 11:43:01 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By moonjumper:



After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....



Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  

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Originally Posted By moonjumper:



Originally Posted By runcible:

Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....



Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  

There are ICU nurses in some areas making $100-$120 an hour. I haven't seen medics making that much.

 
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 11:51:15 AM EDT
You could always go back to working as a prn nurse



Or a PT paramedic





2-3 shifts per month in the ICU to keep you sharp and do the paramedic thing FT.




Or vice versa.




It is not an either/or issue.












Link Posted: 8/21/2015 11:54:31 AM EDT
Go work for a pharmaceutical company in sales and carry a nice handgun.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 11:54:39 AM EDT
Outpatient surgery clinics.
Weekdays only.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 12:01:11 PM EDT
Work extra as an RN and you will bank compared to paramedic wages.  For right or wrong, paramedics here make chump change compared to RN pay.  Plus, RNs have a much higher upside.  With experience, your RN pay can skyrocket.

Yes, there is a down side.  Nursing is a female-dominated field, so there's a lot of estrogen-related nonsense in the field.  You are in charge of patients and must stay near them all 12-hours.  There can be less satisfaction, as you often are just babysitting someone for no real reason and you have to deal with family constantly.  More often than not, families are idiots.  Some doctors can be condescending.  

Do I think you're crazy?  Yes, I do.  You'll never make as much working on the ambulance as you will as a nurse.  As a father, it is your job to provide for your family.  If you quit nursing, you will miss out on all the RN pay as it skyrockets.  Have to look at the big picture.

I think you should crosstrain over to ER.  That's more like an ambulance.  I think you'd like the environment better than ICU.  It is very, very different from ICU, is more like an ambulance, and you'll get RN pay.

Link Posted: 8/21/2015 12:03:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By runcible:
There are ICU nurses in some areas making $100-$120 an hour. I haven't seen medics making that much.  
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Originally Posted By runcible:
Originally Posted By moonjumper:
Originally Posted By runcible:
Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....

Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  
There are ICU nurses in some areas making $100-$120 an hour. I haven't seen medics making that much.  


Please share exactly which hospital pays their ICU RN's $100-120 an hour so I can apply today.
Thanks
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 12:08:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/21/2015 12:19:43 PM EDT by TheAvatar9265ft]
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Originally Posted By moonjumper:
After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....

Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  
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Originally Posted By moonjumper:
Originally Posted By runcible:
Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....

Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  


I never get a permission to put O2 on a patient. I have standing orders, "protocols," just like a medic. A protocol is a doctor telling you what they want you to do beforehand, so you figure it out and don't have to ask, whether you are an EMT, medic, RN, RT, whatever. For RNs, it all depends on what specialty an RN is in. Yea, a LTC nurse with 20 patients at once is going to be calling a doc if they need something. An ICU RN is usually on standing orders or telling a doc to write them orders for what they already did.

Professions are paid based on how much people want to do them (glamor vs BS) + how hard it is to get qualified people (education/training/skill requirements)

Reason that medics don't make what nurses make are primarily the level and length of education involved for each:

EDUCATION:
Most new medics today are a 9-12 month community college program with few prereqs (there are some programs that are 3-6 months taught by tech schools).
Most new RNs today are 4 year university BSN programs (there are still plenty of 2 year ADN community college programs but these typically have another 1+ years of prereqs).

Consequently, RNs get more pay.

GLAMOR VS BS:
Paramedic is a more glamorous position with uniforms, lights and sirens, and adrenaline (at least that is how it is sold to hordes of students).
Nursing involves a lot more BS, poop, vomit, urine, festering wounds vs paramedics. RNs also deal with unpleasant patients and other medical professionals for 12 hours multiple days in a row where a medic can usually be rid of a jerking off violent drunk in less than an hour. (RNs who can't deal quickly leave the field or find a specialty where less of these things are involved). RNs also typically have a higher utilization time during their shift: eg, 6 floor patients at the same time, all the time, or two ICU patients the entire shift, where medics often have no patients for more than half their shift (standing by or driving).

Consequently, RNs get more pay.
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 12:09:04 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Weezer:


Please share exactly which hospital pays their ICU RN's $100-120 an hour so I can apply today.
Thanks
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Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By runcible:
Originally Posted By moonjumper:
Originally Posted By runcible:
Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....

Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  
There are ICU nurses in some areas making $100-$120 an hour. I haven't seen medics making that much.  


Please share exactly which hospital pays their ICU RN's $100-120 an hour so I can apply today.
Thanks


That is ridiculous pay.  I am quite happy with 46 bucks an hour (but have almost 20 years experience) and making 50 after differentials.  I get the 100 on a holiday though.....
Link Posted: 8/21/2015 12:12:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Weezer:
I've worked as a paramedic for years in a busy system, but decided the grass must be greener. So I accepted a job as an RN in an ICU. I like the idea of working in critical care, and the pay is better hourly, but it's 3 twelve hour midnight shifts, no guaranteed overtime. As a paramedic I work two 24 hour shifts a week (8 days a month) and bring home more money because of the built in weekly overtime, and pay less babysitter expenses as well.

Everyone I talk to tells me I'm crazy for leaving the ICU, but after 6 months, I've found its just not for me.

Anyone else ever leave an otherwise good job because they just weren't happy?

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Either your paramedic job payed way above average or your RN job is paying way below.  
I worked as a tech in the ER making more than the paramedics on the road per hour.  When I got my RN, I increased my monthly pay by another $1500.
As an ICU nurse, you should be bringing home more in 36hrs than you did as a medic working 48hrs.

Try the ER, that's where I'm at.  It's as close as you can get to the road while working in a hospital.

Link Posted: 8/21/2015 12:15:43 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Weezer:


Please share exactly which hospital pays their ICU RN's $100-120 an hour so I can apply today.
Thanks
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Originally Posted By Weezer:
Originally Posted By runcible:
Originally Posted By moonjumper:
Originally Posted By runcible:
Paramedics make more than RNs where you are? That's fucked up.
After being romantically involved with a couple RNs in my life and now married to an EMT, the medic typically deserves more than a nurse....

Other than a good trauma/surgical nurse, the rest seem to be overpaid babysitters around here.  Pissed a buddy of mine off after telling him my opinion on it since his wife recently finished nursing school.  Asked him what she was allowed to do on her own without asking a dr first.  Got a not much.  Nurse is required to have a dr permission just to administer O2 here not to mention the real stuff.  
There are ICU nurses in some areas making $100-$120 an hour. I haven't seen medics making that much.  


Please share exactly which hospital pays their ICU RN's $100-120 an hour so I can apply today.
Thanks


There were travel nurses making over $100 an hour in Cali for a while.  Pretty sweet gig.  Travel nursing isn't as lucrative as it used to be, though.

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