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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/1/2005 9:27:26 PM EDT
If this works...


Army Set to Partner in Trauma Blood Substitute Study
An Army initiative to test a blood substitute in San Antonio may eventually help Soldiers on the battlefield.

Brooke Army Medical Center and University Hospital will participate in a national clinical trial to evaluate the safety and usefulness of PolyHeme, an oxygen-carrying blood substitute designed to increased the survival of critically injured and bleeding patients.

PolyHeme, is a universally compatible, immediately available, oxygen-carrying resuscitative fluid designed for use in urgent blood loss when blood is not immediately available. PolyHeme has previously been studied in the hospital setting in trauma patients demonstrating an improved survival, according to the Journal of the American College of Surgeons in October 2002.

Manufactured by Northfield Laboratories Inc., of Evanston, Ill, PolyHeme requires no cross matching, making it immediately available and compatible with all blood types, and has an extended shelf-life of more than 12 months.

In the study protocol, treatment would begin before arrival at the hospital, either at the scene of the injury or in the air ambulance, and continue during a 12-hour post-injury period in the hospital. The use of PolyHeme has the potential to address a critical unmet medical need for an oxygen-carrying solution where blood is not available.

The study will compare the survival rate of patients receiving PolyHeme to those who receive saline solution, the current standard of care.

"Were excited to be included in this groundbreaking clinical trial," said Col. Toney Baskin, an Army trauma surgeon and principal study investigator.

Trauma-related injuries are a leading cause of death among Americans under 45 years old according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Baskin said.

"Almost one in five trauma patients die from their injuries," he said. "If we can begin to treat these patients very early with an oxygen-carrying solution and keep their hemoglobin levels up, we might have more survivors."

Because the patients eligible for this study are unlikely to be able to provide informed consent due to the extent and nature of their injuries, the study will be conducted under federal regulations allowing for clinical research in emergency settings using an exception from the requirement for informed consent.

Use of this provision in a study protocol is granted by the Institutional Review Board responsible for approval of the research study, if IRB finds that patients are in a life-threatening situation requiring emergency medical intervention, currently available treatments are unsatisfactory, potential risks are reasonable, and participation in the study could provide a direct benefit to the patients enrolled.

Baskin said that San Antonio Airlife personnel would use the blood substitute. San Antonio Airlife has a paramedic and a nurse aboard each of the flights bringing trauma patients to Level 1 facilities like BAMC.

PolyHeme looks like blood, but stays in a patient's system for about 24 hours. He said that current research indicates the product is very safe and that there are no serious adverse events attributable to the use of PolyHeme.

"It can buy you time in a trauma situation, but it will not eliminate the need for blood banks," Baskin said.

END



Source: Pentagon Brief




If it can be mass produced,
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:32:04 PM EDT
They've been working on that stuff for years. Not new to me. I wonder how long that stuff'll last in a medic's aid bag in the desert.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:32:07 PM EDT
thats pretty damn cool.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:32:45 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:39:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
That's pretty cool. As long as it can be banged in faster than it's being lost...



Run four drips... one in each limb...

I went to the website www.northfieldlabs.com/history.html
It avoids mentioning if refrigeration is needed or how much...

course everyone but the Light Infantry/SF types can just carry coolers- they allready seem to be a perminant adornment for every track and truck over there....
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:41:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MachinegunManiac:
They've been working on that stuff for years. Not new to me. I wonder how long that stuff'll last in a medic's aid bag in the desert.



Probably about as long as real blood.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:44:46 PM EDT
Very interesting indeed.

BTW, I just pasted a portion of that into a chatroom I'm in right now and one liberal quickly piped up with these comments:

" HURRAY FOR SPILLED BLOOD!"

"ONWARD BLEEDING CHRISTIAN SOLDIERS!"

I suppose even these people are so fucked up in the head that they somehow see this is a bad thing too. What retards.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:46:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/1/2005 9:48:53 PM EDT by ArmdLbrl]

Originally Posted By 1Andy2:

Originally Posted By MachinegunManiac:
They've been working on that stuff for years. Not new to me. I wonder how long that stuff'll last in a medic's aid bag in the desert.



Probably about as long as real blood.



Thats not long... how long does just blood plasma last?

Another thing I noticed in the website- this is the end result of a program that goes back to 1969, this is the last technological spinnoff of the Vietnam War... talk about perservierence...
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 9:56:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 82ndAbn:
That's pretty cool. As long as it can be banged in faster than it's being lost...



THAT is the key.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:08:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Charging_Handle:
Very interesting indeed.

BTW, I just pasted a portion of that into a chatroom I'm in right now and one liberal quickly piped up with these comments:

" HURRAY FOR SPILLED BLOOD!"

"ONWARD BLEEDING CHRISTIAN SOLDIERS!"

I suppose even these people are so fucked up in the head that they somehow see this is a bad thing too. What retards.



I'd wager at least 3/4 of DU hope for the deaths of our soldiers. They won't admit to it (most) but they really do. As soon as it becomes politically correct to bash the troops ala 60s style, they'll be out spewing their bullshit.

It makes me sick to hear "we support the troops...just not xxx" bull fucking shit. Every soldier that I've talked to (coming back from Iraq) has said the same thing. It is total fucking bullshit. They know who these people are and what they really want.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:26:58 PM EDT
I have seen people literally bleed to death. Doesnt take long. The problem is you can have all the blood in the world or artificial blood. It doesnt correct clotting problems like DIC or replace them. So you can pump it in but it will come out faster. All this will do is save alot of O neg blood.
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:46:56 PM EDT
Is this the same as Oxyglobin or is it a new & improved version?
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 10:49:34 PM EDT
When they come out with something like the tri-ox injection they have in Star Trek I will get excited!
Link Posted: 8/1/2005 11:08:18 PM EDT
This stuff lacks the clotting factor of real blood, so the wound still needs to be addressed. And even several wide-open IV's cannot compete with a serious bleeder-such as a fem or brach artery wound. But it's definitely a start!!
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