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Posted: 4/19/2016 2:22:16 PM EDT
I've had dual citizenship for most of my life (US Born but have an English mother who is a registered alien not a US Citizen)



We've kept up both passports for example but never really used the British one much...How does this situation work? I am under the impression after a number of years the British one goes away.




Any clarification would be helpful.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:23:29 PM EDT
You must be rich
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:26:14 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Silver_Surfer:


You must be rich
View Quote
LOL not hardly.

 



My mom was learning how to fly helicopters in TEXAS. She met my dad and they dated for a few years before marrying. The rest is history.




The British passport honestly to me doesn't do a lot....I mean I can go to Cuba for example on the Brit one but I am sure there is still some red tape.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:26:55 PM EDT
It depends on the country.

I have dual US/Canadian citizenship thanks to the "waking up Canadian" law change a few years ago.

Hasn't had any impact on my life whatsoever so far.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:28:02 PM EDT
just dont tell the other country you are a U.S citizen. None of their business. I had trouble renewing my Russian one...they were asking me garbage like "why were you gone in the States for xx years"? I told them I was studying

They went off easy there. Idk, to be honest my Russian passport is useless
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:30:49 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 2:37:11 PM EDT by dorobuta]
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
I've had dual citizenship for most of my life (US Born but have an English mother who is a registered alien not a US Citizen)

We've kept up both passports for example but never really used the British one much...How does this situation work? I am under the impression after a number of years the British one goes away.


Any clarification would be helpful.
View Quote



if you failed to declare otherwise, at 18 you lost your dual citizenship from the stand point of the US and became a 100% U.S. citizen. (We went through this with our son - his mother was Canadian at the time of his birth)
The U.S. evidently doesn't recognize dual citizenship in adults anymore - we went through this when my wife became a US citizen. (Canada said they don't care what the US says and they do recognize dual citizenship)
Britain may or may not recognize dual citizenship - I don't know, contact the embassy if you want to find out.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:31:22 PM EDT
My buddy was born in TX but his Dad was from Canada so he's a dual citizen. He even has a Canadian social health card.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:32:51 PM EDT
I've been a ROK / US dual citizen all my life. I was born in Korea to American parents while my Dad was assigned there in the service.

Coffee still costs me $3.50 at Starbucks.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:32:51 PM EDT
I am a dual British/U.S citizen. My experience has been that when I take a trip, I have to use the same passport all the way through. If I fly from America to Britain, I use my British passport when arriving in England, and when I arrive in the US at the end of the trip. I tend to use the British one when traveling to Europe as there is less of a "dirty American" stigma when I have to show it.

As far as passports, you have to renew in each country just the same as you would do with only one passport. They do not "go away," as you are born with the dual citizenship. You might have a little trouble when trying to renew an already expired passport though.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:34:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 2:35:12 PM EDT by fettesbrotde]
Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.







I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.










Dual citizenship works like this:



In America, I'm an American citizen



In Europe, I'm a German citizen










When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.










I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.







Simple.




 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:34:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 2:37:11 PM EDT by Tony-Ri]
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:34:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
I've had dual citizenship for most of my life (US Born but have an English mother who is a registered alien not a US Citizen)

We've kept up both passports for example but never really used the British one much...How does this situation work? I am under the impression after a number of years the British one goes away.


Any clarification would be helpful.
View Quote


Depends on the country.  While you gain some benefits, you also have to realize, you are subject to all the laws of both also - and it's really easy to break them without knowing. For example, using the UK  passport to get to Cuba is cool and all, until the US finds about it and charges you with a felony anyway (though that specific scenario is unlikely to pop up much any more).  Also if you get arrested in the UK (your example) the US typically won't do shit for you except in really extreme circumstances. Obviously not much of a problem with the UK, but I'm sure there are things that are illegal there that aren't here you could do without thinking about it.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:41:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:
Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.

I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.


Dual citizenship works like this:
In America, I'm an American citizen
In Europe, I'm a German citizen


When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.


I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.


Simple.
 
View Quote



You just confirmed what I said.

or try leaving on one passport and coming back on the other - then see how that dual citizenship works out for you.

the US recognizes you as an American. Period. Germany may recognize you as both. The US does not.  Feel free to contact the department of Naturalization - we DID.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:42:51 PM EDT
Legally, no.  The US doesn't so much recognize dual citizenship, it ignores it.  As far as the US government is concerned, you are a US citizen, and thus need to follow all US laws and have literally no rights beyond those other US citizens get - for example, you won't be given an option to call the German consulate if arrested like a non-US German citizen would.  If you commit an action that is a crime for US citizens to commit where you happen to be, claiming that it's not illegal for Germans certainly won't help you at all. Also, things like customs can get interesting, though probably not for a German.  Just out of curiosity, do Germans still have to register for conscription?  If they do, serving in a foreign military can in some circumstances cost you your US citizenship.

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:
Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.

I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.


Dual citizenship works like this:
In America, I'm an American citizen
In Europe, I'm a German citizen


When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.


I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.


Simple.
 
View Quote

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 2:51:54 PM EDT
I hold US, Hungarian, Filipino, and Italian.

I don't tell the others of what I have.


That's all.

DADT.

BTW, I was born in the US parents are both citizens.

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:05:10 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dorobuta:



You just confirmed what I said.

or try leaving on one passport and coming back on the other - then see how that dual citizenship works out for you.

the US recognizes you as an American. Period. Germany may recognize you as both. The US does not.  Feel free to contact the department of Naturalization - we DID.
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Originally Posted By dorobuta:
Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:
Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.

I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.


Dual citizenship works like this:
In America, I'm an American citizen
In Europe, I'm a German citizen


When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.


I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.


Simple.
 



You just confirmed what I said.

or try leaving on one passport and coming back on the other - then see how that dual citizenship works out for you.

the US recognizes you as an American. Period. Germany may recognize you as both. The US does not.  Feel free to contact the department of Naturalization - we DID.


Id go one step further and advise that if you are a US Citizen, coming back thru any border, do not offer anything other than your US Passport.

Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:16:06 PM EDT
My daughters hold three passports, UK, US and NZ.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:25:38 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Phocks:
Legally, no.  The US doesn't so much recognize dual citizenship, it ignores it.  As far as the US government is concerned, you are a US citizen, and thus need to follow all US laws and have literally no rights beyond those other US citizens get - for example, you won't be given an option to call the German consulate if arrested like a non-US German citizen would.  If you commit an action that is a crime for US citizens to commit where you happen to be, claiming that it's not illegal for Germans certainly won't help you at all. Also, things like customs can get interesting, though probably not for a German.  Just out of curiosity, do Germans still have to register for conscription?  If they do, serving in a foreign military can in some circumstances cost you your US citizenship.


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Originally Posted By Phocks:
Legally, no.  The US doesn't so much recognize dual citizenship, it ignores it.  As far as the US government is concerned, you are a US citizen, and thus need to follow all US laws and have literally no rights beyond those other US citizens get - for example, you won't be given an option to call the German consulate if arrested like a non-US German citizen would.  If you commit an action that is a crime for US citizens to commit where you happen to be, claiming that it's not illegal for Germans certainly won't help you at all. Also, things like customs can get interesting, though probably not for a German.  Just out of curiosity, do Germans still have to register for conscription?  If they do, serving in a foreign military can in some circumstances cost you your US citizenship.

Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:
Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.

I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.


Dual citizenship works like this:
In America, I'm an American citizen
In Europe, I'm a German citizen


When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.


I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.


Simple.
 


Maybe I don't get questioned due to my accent?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:52:39 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Phocks:


Legally, no.  The US doesn't so much recognize dual citizenship, it ignores it.  As far as the US government is concerned, you are a US citizen, and thus need to follow all US laws and have literally no rights beyond those other US citizens get - for example, you won't be given an option to call the German consulate if arrested like a non-US German citizen would.  If you commit an action that is a crime for US citizens to commit where you happen to be, claiming that it's not illegal for Germans certainly won't help you at all. Also, things like customs can get interesting, though probably not for a German.  Just out of curiosity, do Germans still have to register for conscription?  If they do, serving in a foreign military can in some circumstances cost you your US citizenship.






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Originally Posted By Phocks:


Legally, no.  The US doesn't so much recognize dual citizenship, it ignores it.  As far as the US government is concerned, you are a US citizen, and thus need to follow all US laws and have literally no rights beyond those other US citizens get - for example, you won't be given an option to call the German consulate if arrested like a non-US German citizen would.  If you commit an action that is a crime for US citizens to commit where you happen to be, claiming that it's not illegal for Germans certainly won't help you at all. Also, things like customs can get interesting, though probably not for a German.  Just out of curiosity, do Germans still have to register for conscription?  If they do, serving in a foreign military can in some circumstances cost you your US citizenship.




Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:

Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.



I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.





Dual citizenship works like this:

In America, I'm an American citizen

In Europe, I'm a German citizen





When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.





I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.





Simple.

 






 
My point was they definitely "recognize" it (albeit limited in each others country - for example, i certainly CAN get German consulate support here, and US support there). Many who say they dont need to look it up or call and ask the dept of state. Note, this can be different for each country.




As said, I travel to each country on that country's passport, and I've done this extensively. Granted, again, that may be due to specific country relations - Canada or Britain could be different.




Germany has not had conscription and has been all volunteer since 2011.




Additionally I served in the US military and it has not affected my citizenship one bit (NATO members, and exemptions exist). Had I decided to serve in the Germany military it also would not have affected my US citizenship.




Again, dual citizenship isn't as black and white as some think. That's what I'm trying to help people understand.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:54:30 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By XNARC:
Id go one step further and advise that if you are a US Citizen, coming back thru any border, do not offer anything other than your US Passport.



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Originally Posted By XNARC:



Originally Posted By dorobuta:


Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:

Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.



I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.





Dual citizenship works like this:

In America, I'm an American citizen

In Europe, I'm a German citizen





When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.





I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.





Simple.

 






You just confirmed what I said.



or try leaving on one passport and coming back on the other - then see how that dual citizenship works out for you.



the US recognizes you as an American. Period. Germany may recognize you as both. The US does not.  Feel free to contact the department of Naturalization - we DID.




Id go one step further and advise that if you are a US Citizen, coming back thru any border, do not offer anything other than your US Passport.







 
This, and as the other poster said, in practice it's very DADT.




I will admit, it's far more cumbersome to be an "American" outside of this country.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:55:59 PM EDT
Dual citizenship is irrelevant in the US.

You are US and that's all they care about.

Pay your US taxes and for the love of sweet fuck enter the US with your US Passport.

I have my Canadian one in case I ever want to retire in Halifax.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 3:59:03 PM EDT
My wife has Israeli and US passports. Leave and enter the U.S. on a U.S. passport. Leave and enter Israel on an Israeli passport.   In Israel it makes things easier.  Anywhere else she travels on her U.S. passport only.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 4:07:03 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Phocks:
Just out of curiosity, do Germans still have to register for conscription?  If they do, serving in a foreign military can in some circumstances cost you your US citizenship.

View Quote


It's unlikely that serving as an enlisted soldier in a non-hostile military would be a problem legally. SCOTUS holds that volunteering to fight for a cause is a form of speech.

Serving as an officer might be trouble. Probably not in NATO, but for other countries.

Having other nationalities can be a problem if you want to get or keep a security clearance. Sometimes they don't care, seems like Canadians are mostly ok, but they will likely ask you to surrender the passport.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 4:10:34 PM EDT
When I am entering and in the US,I am an American. When I'm in Europe,I'm Estonian;unless somebody is shit talking the USA and then I get my red,white and blue on and fuck you pal. It's just how I do.Nobody in the US knows where Estonia is nevermind cares about it so the reverse is never an issue. I have zero interest in going to countries that couldn't be travelled to with a US passport. Why the hell would I want to go to Cuba? The bastard child of a devil's threesome of Zimbabwe,Mexico and the USSR? Disgusting.Cuba is so shitty Cubans tie themselves to pool toys to escape,I see no attraction of going there any more than visiting DPRK.

 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 4:13:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 4:14:55 PM EDT by America-first]
OP could serve as Prime Minister of Great Britain, vote in British elections, or serve in its military,  with no negative effects on his US Citizenship.

IIRC, Golda  Meir, Prime Minister of Israel, was born in Chicago and retained her American Citizenship.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 4:15:33 PM EDT
Traveling to the EU, I use my UK passport to bypass the long, long lines that Americans stand in.
Returning to the US, there really isn't any difference in the way US and non-US are treated, and the US passport saves me having to deal with that visa crap.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 4:26:05 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PhilipPeake:
Traveling to the EU, I use my UK passport to bypass the long, long lines that Americans stand in.
Returning to the US, there really isn't any difference in the way US and non-US are treated, and the US passport saves me having to deal with that visa crap.
View Quote



This is a sad truth.

In most other countries their citizens have a lot easier time entering their country than foreigners.  In the U.S. it is a pain in the ass for everyone.  (unless you walk across the southern border....)
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:25:36 PM EDT
I am a naturalized US Citizen, and native-born NZ Citizen.    <<<---- See wot I did there?



As far as any dealings with the USA, I am American. Period. Done. Finish.



As far as any dealings with the rest of the world, including NZ, I can be either.

NZ recognizes dual-citizenship, whereas USA does not.



So, I enter and leave the USA as an American, anywhere else, I get to choose. So far, I have not been asked by customs,

or immigration, anywhere, if I have additional passports.

Nor have I been searched by customs since becoming naturalized.

I've often wondered what would happen if customs decided to toss my carry-on, and found my other passport.



Once, when traveling to the BVI, I produced my NZ passport when departing the US. It was a brand-new passport, just

renewed. This was first-use, so no stamps, visas, nada.

The airline person thumbed through it twice, I assume looking for a US visa and I-94 entry form.

She had a very puzzled look, but did not say anything. I just .

Arrived in the BVI, entered as a Kiwi. Returned to the USA as American..



That is how I understand it to work, anyway. YMMV.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:32:38 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By PhilipPeake:


Traveling to the EU, I use my UK passport to bypass the long, long lines that Americans stand in.

Returning to the US, there really isn't any difference in the way US and non-US are treated, and the US passport saves me having to deal with that visa crap.
View Quote


Not my experience, at all.



Depending on the size of the entry facility, there is often a separate line for US Citizens.

And it flows a lot faster, as a US Citizen CANNOT be denied entry, into your home country.

Searched, yes, grilled as to where yo been, yes, denied, no.



So you dont have to wait in line with all the screaming kids, goats, chikens, pigs,

and unwashed masses telling their life story of lies to the Immigration dude, in the Visitor line.



 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:34:02 PM EDT
We need to end all "dual" citizenship in this county....you want to be a citizen of the USA then fine be one....you want to be a citizen of some other country fine go be one there...

You can't be loyal to two different countries simultaneously anymore than you can serve two masters...

thats my .02
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:38:59 PM EDT
my wife was recently naturalized here, can i get MX citizenship through marraige to her?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:40:39 PM EDT
US/UK

Due to an administrative anomaly, when you swear your oath to the US you renounce all other citizenship, however for the UK to recognise this you would have to do so in front of a British consular official.

Thereby causing said anomaly, whereby both claim you as a citizen....
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 5:45:07 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 9divdoc:


We need to end all "dual" citizenship in this county....you want to be a citizen of the USA then fine be one....you want to be a citizen of some other country fine go be one there...



You can't be loyal to two different countries simultaneously anymore than you can serve two masters...



thats my .02
View Quote




 
Nah, they would just need to be American first. One of the many reasons I hate "African American" as a description. At the very least it should be the other way around, if it's even applicable.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:15:47 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
LOL not hardly.  

My mom was learning how to fly helicopters in TEXAS. She met my dad and they dated for a few years before marrying. The rest is history.


The British passport honestly to me doesn't do a lot....I mean I can go to Cuba for example on the Brit one but I am sure there is still some red tape.
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Originally Posted By saigamanTX:
Originally Posted By Silver_Surfer:
You must be rich
LOL not hardly.  

My mom was learning how to fly helicopters in TEXAS. She met my dad and they dated for a few years before marrying. The rest is history.


The British passport honestly to me doesn't do a lot....I mean I can go to Cuba for example on the Brit one but I am sure there is still some red tape.


I was born in England too, there are two benefits that you might not immediately be aware of. First, being a dual national allows you international banking, something most Americans can't do. The other thing is that England has many former colonies and protectorates, so you can travel freely to them without a visa. You may also live and work in the Eurozone if you choose to.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:22:29 PM EDT
I heard entering/leaving US you have to use your US passport. As this is usually less hassle anyway this is what I do.

Everywhere else I just go in whichever immigration line is shortest (I have entered the UK on my US passport and no one said anything). Some places (Chile a few years back) I used my UK passport so I didn't have to pay for an entry visa.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:24:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 7:25:07 PM EDT by Sputnik556]
OP, you should move there and start a kind of 2A friendly party.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:30:17 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By 9divdoc:
We need to end all "dual" citizenship in this county....you want to be a citizen of the USA then fine be one....you want to be a citizen of some other country fine go be one there...

You can't be loyal to two different countries simultaneously anymore than you can serve two masters...

thats my .02
View Quote


I'm going with a big ol' yawn on that one. If it's not causing problems I fail to see why we should start placing more restrictions on people.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:32:45 PM EDT

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By CombatTruckMonkey:


I am a dual British/U.S citizen. My experience has been that when I take a trip, I have to use the same passport all the way through. If I fly from America to Britain, I use my British passport when arriving in England, and when I arrive in the US at the end of the trip. I tend to use the British one when traveling to Europe as there is less of a "dirty American" stigma when I have to show it.



As far as passports, you have to renew in each country just the same as you would do with only one passport. They do not "go away," as you are born with the dual citizenship. You might have a little trouble when trying to renew an already expired passport though.
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Wat... you represent yourself as a foreign national when re-entering the US?



That means they have to admit you under an alien status like the Visa Waiver Program... which doesn't make any sense if you're American...



Cut that shit out bro...



FWIW I have Canadian and American citizenship



 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:36:30 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 7:37:04 PM EDT by Ohio_Bill]


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LinkedM4:



my wife was recently naturalized here, can i get MX citizenship through marraige to her?
View Quote



Maybe, you'll have to check the rules in MX. My wife could in theory get Canadian citizenship through marriage to me, but the process is a PITA and not worth it unless we wanted to move to Canada permanently which is not happening... I like the US too much
Congrats on your wife's natz





 
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:50:47 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:53:03 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:56:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 7:57:13 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By XNARC:


Id go one step further and advise that if you are a US Citizen, coming back thru any border, do not offer anything other than your US Passport.

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Originally Posted By XNARC:
Originally Posted By dorobuta:
Originally Posted By fettesbrotde:
Nonsense ^ Might be the case with US / Canadian or US / British, but the US absolutely "recognizes" dual citizenship.

I'm a dual German-American citizen. I hold citizenship and a passport from both countries.


Dual citizenship works like this:
In America, I'm an American citizen
In Europe, I'm a German citizen


When I enter the US I used my US passport. When I enter Germany or the EU, I use my German passport. For all other countries I can use whatever I want.


I did not have to choose by 18 (or whatever age) and still retain the citizenship of both, and will until death.


Simple.
 



You just confirmed what I said.

or try leaving on one passport and coming back on the other - then see how that dual citizenship works out for you.

the US recognizes you as an American. Period. Germany may recognize you as both. The US does not.  Feel free to contact the department of Naturalization - we DID.


Id go one step further and advise that if you are a US Citizen, coming back thru any border, do not offer anything other than your US Passport.



That's US law.  If you hold a US passport, you *must* travel in and out of the US on that US passport and no other.  That doesn't mean you lose your dual citizenship.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 8:01:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/19/2016 8:09:47 PM EDT by gammaecho22]
I'm German born, German citizen. When my mother remarried it was to a US soldier and we ended up in the US when I was 8. I had my German passport which I still have, and eventually (not sure exactly when it happened) ended up with a US passport whenever my mother and I became full US citizens. I was told I had the option at some point of staying a dual citizen or giving 1 up, but I kept both.

Whenever I fly into Europe, I use the German one coming in. Whenever I fly into the US, I use the US passport. No one has ever noticed that both passports are filled with '1 way stamps'.

Ironically, of all the countries I have flown into/out of (used to travel very frequently) the US in the biggest pain in the ass to return to for its own citizens. Only in the US have I noticed that your immigration/pass check for visitors/VISA holders are much much faster and better staffed than the counters for returning citizens. In Taiwan, Japan, Germany, England, Switzerland, Spain and Italy, if you are a citizen they have special lines and you fly through. If you are visiting, you get to wait in the horde of people. In the US I've seen its usually completely backwards.

ETA - Fun fact - apparently you are not allowed to have a US passport and serve as an officer in a foreign military. Well, it happened anyways. It was a long time ago, but I went back to Germany to go to the Uni in Berlin. During this time the civil service draft still existed (ended a few years ago I heard) and I was drafted after I graduated having lived in Germany with part of my family for going on 4 years at this point. I was in my early 20s, no one asked about a US or any other passport, no one mentioned a thing about anything like this. How the hell would I know? Ended up extending and signing an actual service contract for a total of 4 years, ended up in the infantry and went to their equivalent of OCS as well as MWCS. Was a 2nd Lieutenant, eventually Oberleutnant by the time I got out. Didn't find this gem out until 10+ years later when I worked for a DoD company and almost needed a security clearance for a site I was going to be working at.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 8:43:49 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 9divdoc:
We need to end all "dual" citizenship in this county....you want to be a citizen of the USA then fine be one....you want to be a citizen of some other country fine go be one there...

You can't be loyal to two different countries simultaneously anymore than you can serve two masters...

thats my .02
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I always thought the motto of GD was "get both"
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 9:55:42 PM EDT
Double the taxes.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 9:58:33 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By centroid:
I've been a ROK / US dual citizen all my life. I was born in Korea to American parents while my Dad was assigned there in the service.

Coffee still costs me $3.50 at Starbucks.
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If you go back to the ROK for a visit will you get conscripted?
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 10:36:16 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By outofbattery:
When I am entering and in the US,I am an American. When I'm in Europe,I'm Estonian;unless somebody is shit talking the USA and then I get my red,white and blue on and fuck you pal. It's just how I do.Nobody in the US knows where Estonia is nevermind cares about it so the reverse is never an issue. I have zero interest in going to countries that couldn't be travelled to with a US passport. Why the hell would I want to go to Cuba? The bastard child of a devil's threesome of Zimbabwe,Mexico and the USSR? Disgusting.Cuba is so shitty Cubans tie themselves to pool toys to escape,I see no attraction of going there any more than visiting DPRK.

 http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y86/mossie500/kerpow/8F46698E-FFFF-41A1-A98A-34417FF06545-6042-0000078D7BEB0DCE_zps6dc4f69b.jpg
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Love this......
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 10:41:49 PM EDT
It's difficult to get Mexican citizenship through marraige. You have to live there, be fluent in Spanish, wait 5 years,(I think), take a Mexican history test, and then you get conditional citizenship, which in therory you lose if you move out of Mexico. Don't know why anyone would want to claim that passport
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 11:16:09 PM EDT
The U.S. evidently doesn't recognize dual citizenship in adults anymore - we went through this when my wife became a US citizen.
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As part of the U.S. naturalization process, there's a pro forma renunciation of any other citizenships. However, the effectiveness of that depends on the other country's laws. For example, Greece does not allow people to renounce Greek citizenship unless there's a formal vote of approval ("private bill") by the Greek parliament. In practice, that's impossible to get. Therefore, if a naturalized American citizen of Greek origin returns to Greece, he has all the rights and responsibilities of a Greek citizen, including being drafted into the Greek armed forces. There's nothing the American Embassy can do to intervene on his behalf.

In the landmark case of Afroyim v. Rusk (1967), the U.S. Supreme Court effectively recognized dual citizenship. Afroyim was a naturalized American citizen who went to Israel and took up Israeli citizenship under Israel's "law of return." After he voted in an Israeli election, the State Department tried to revoke his U.S. passport on the ground that voting was an "expatriating act." The Court ruled that such an act could not be expatriating unless there was "specific intent" shown to voluntarily give up U.S. citizenship.
Link Posted: 4/19/2016 11:22:53 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By MyAliyah:
Double the taxes.
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No. I pay zero German taxes.
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