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Posted: 7/19/2008 11:06:46 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 11:10:57 AM EDT by Brians_45]
My power supply in my vault is in a metal box on the wall and it has a cam-lock lock on it. Well, my dumb ass seems to have lost the key. I called the company that makes the power supply and they said they can't send me a replacement and to call a locksmith. The locksmith wants $200 to open it. Fuck that.

My question is this: Is it possible to drill this lock out? If so, does the bit have to go all the way through the lock or will the lock fail at some point before that? I ask that because there is a circuit board in the box and I don't want to damage it with flying hot metal as I come out the back of the lock.

Any other ideas that won't blow up my house, set anything on fire or damage the equipment are welcome.

Help!

ETA: Pic from when it was open
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:10:04 AM EDT
If the lock is any good drilling it out will only trigger what are called relockers, which serve to secure the safe against tweakers armed with a drill.

Call the locksmith.

BSW
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:10:21 AM EDT
Blow up the house, then set fire to it...Nevermind.


You can drill through anything, and if the lock has brass tumblers, it will fail before you get all the way through.

Ask me how I know x3...
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:11:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By briansmithwins:
If the lock is any good drilling it out will only trigger what are called relockers, which serve to secure the safe against tweakers armed with a drill.

Call the locksmith.

BSW


It's not a safe. It's just a dinky metal box. Do those locks have such safeguards?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:15:05 AM EDT
Damn, it looks like such a simple lock that it would be easy to pick. Is the key single or double-sided?
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:18:33 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/19/2008 11:18:47 AM EDT by Brians_45]

Originally Posted By C-4:
Damn, it looks like such a simple lock that it would be easy to pick. Is the key single or double-sided?


I think it was only single sided. I don't know how to pick locks, though. I missed that day in burglary school.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:18:49 AM EDT
Looks like a basic cheap lock. if you dont really car about the box, pry it open. then, you could mount a master lock. if you want to drill, use a metal bit. The bit should be the same size as the key, or smaller. Preferably smaller. Drill in until the tumblers can fall out or the lock turns. With the cheap lock it wont take much.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:21:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By psdiver102:
Looks like a basic cheap lock. if you dont really car about the box, pry it open. then, you could mount a master lock. if you want to drill, use a metal bit. The bit should be the same size as the key, or smaller. Preferably smaller. Drill in until the tumblers can fall out or the lock turns. With the cheap lock it wont take much.


How much smaller?

I had the 1/2" bit out and ready to go.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:21:43 AM EDT
Just pry it open. Replace box. Problem solved. Drilling the lock should work, too.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 11:32:16 AM EDT
Well, that was easy. Drill bit did the job just fine. Thanks guys!
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 1:23:31 PM EDT
Too late but for those reading this..... The wafer locks typically installed on this type of inclosure are very easy to pick. Any locksmith can do it and so can you. Use a very small screwdriver to put pressure on the cylinder. Insert the screwdriver just enough to be able to slightly turn the cylinder. Now insert a thin piece of wire such as a paper clip into the keyway and bounce it around while keeping pressure on the lock with the screwdriver. It will open in less than a minute.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 1:26:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:
Too late but for those reading this..... The wafer locks typically installed on this type of inclosure are very easy to pick. Any locksmith can do it and so can you. Use a very small screwdriver to put pressure on the cylinder. Insert the screwdriver just enough to be able to slightly turn the cylinder. Now insert a thin piece of wire such as a paper clip into the keyway and bounce it around while keeping pressure on the lock with the screwdriver. It will open in less than a minute.


+1

I've made a lot of friends that way
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:44:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Canooger:

Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:
Too late but for those reading this..... The wafer locks typically installed on this type of inclosure are very easy to pick. Any locksmith can do it and so can you. Use a very small screwdriver to put pressure on the cylinder. Insert the screwdriver just enough to be able to slightly turn the cylinder. Now insert a thin piece of wire such as a paper clip into the keyway and bounce it around while keeping pressure on the lock with the screwdriver. It will open in less than a minute.


+1

I've made a lot of friends that way


I work in access control panels and camera housings and it is surprising how often nobody has a key to them. The cheap wafer locks can be opened about as fast without a key as with a key.
Link Posted: 7/19/2008 6:47:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:

Originally Posted By Canooger:

Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:
Too late but for those reading this..... The wafer locks typically installed on this type of inclosure are very easy to pick. Any locksmith can do it and so can you. Use a very small screwdriver to put pressure on the cylinder. Insert the screwdriver just enough to be able to slightly turn the cylinder. Now insert a thin piece of wire such as a paper clip into the keyway and bounce it around while keeping pressure on the lock with the screwdriver. It will open in less than a minute.


+1

I've made a lot of friends that way


I work in access control panels and camera housings and it is surprising how often nobody has a key to them. The cheap wafer locks can be opened about as fast without a key as with a key.


That would have been some good info a few hours ago!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:10:07 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 4:10:30 PM EDT by TexAR]
LockPicks.com

Buy a small set and start practicing. It's not very hard, especially those el cheapo wafer locks like the one you were dealing with.

Most automotive locks are also wafer-type. A few years ago I get a FedEx delivery, then notice that the truck is still out in the street. It turns out that the guy locked his truck keys in the back of the truck and can't leave. He asks if he can use my phone to call someone to come get him. I look at the back door and it's a high security American lock. Shit, can't help him with that. Buy the ignition is a cheapo wafer lock so I just pick it and turn it with a screwdriver and start up his truck. I tell him to drive it back to the depot and just stick anything in the key slot to turn it off. Ever since then I have been getting superb service with no mistakes from FedEx.

Just a few months ago I upgraded my cable to HD/Broadband and the cable guy came out to run new cables. After he crawls out from under my house, he discovers that he locked his keys in his van. He was upset because when this got back to his boss it would go in his personnel record and maybe even cost him his job. (He was probably a fuck up and on thin ice already.) So I got out my pick set and picked open the passenger door lock. He was so happy he ran free drops into other rooms and told me I could have anything in his truck. I grabbed a several WiFi PC cards and some PCI cards.

With a little practice you wouldn't believe how easy you can open your standard pin tumbler Westlock/Taylor/Kwikset household crap lock. And having the tools and skills may save you a bunch of time and money in the future.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:14:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By TexAR:
LockPicks.com

Buy a small set and start practicing. It's not very hard, especially those el cheapo wafer locks like the one you were dealing with.

Most automotive locks are also wafer-type. A few years ago I get a FedEx delivery, then notice that the truck is still out in the street. It turns out that the guy locked his truck keys in the back of the truck and can't leave. He asks if he can use my phone to call someone to come get him. I look at the back door and it's a high security American lock. Shit, can't help him with that. Buy the ignition is a cheapo wafer lock so I just pick it and turn it with a screwdriver and start up his truck. I tell him to drive it back to the depot and just stick anything in the key slot to turn it off. Ever since then I have been getting superb service with no mistakes from FedEx.

Just a few months ago I upgraded my cable to HD/Broadband and the cable guy came out to run new cables. After he crawls out from under my house, he discovers that he locked his keys in his van. He was upset because when this got back to his boss it would go in his personnel record and maybe even cost him his job. (He was probably a fuck up and on thin ice already.) So I got out my pick set and picked open the passenger door lock. He was so happy he ran free drops into other rooms and told me I could have anything in his truck. I grabbed a several WiFi PC cards and some PCI cards.

With a little practice you wouldn't believe how easy you can open your standard pin tumbler Westlock/Taylor/Kwikset household crap lock. And having the tools and skills may save you a bunch of time and money in the future.


Just don't keep them with you when you leave your house. Possession of lockpicking tools by some one who is not licensed/bonded in the lock smith field is frequently
viewed as possession of burglary tools. Many a DA/LEO will consider the fact that you have them a "guilty till proven innocent" situation.

Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:16:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/20/2008 4:19:05 PM EDT by BillofRights]

Originally Posted By Headless_T_Gunner:
Too late but for those reading this..... The wafer locks typically installed on this type of inclosure are very easy to pick. Any locksmith can do it and so can you. Use a very small screwdriver to put pressure on the cylinder. Insert the screwdriver just enough to be able to slightly turn the cylinder. Now insert a thin piece of wire such as a paper clip into the keyway and bounce it around while keeping pressure on the lock with the screwdriver. It will open in less than a minute.




For other members with future lockouts: you could also have used a similar key that fits, and simply raked it over the pins in a quick in/out motion, while putting very slight rotational pressure on the cylinder. 1 minute max, when you get the hang of it.
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:21:47 PM EDT
how much money did you spend on the walk in vault? IIRC you had this custom built into your house? Where is the spare key? IMO. Would not drill, could screw something up.



Spare keys rule!!!!
Link Posted: 7/20/2008 4:23:06 PM EDT
Take a big ass hammer to it and be done....
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