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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 12/21/2016 2:13:20 PM EST
Just thinking I could save so money by not heating 2 unused rooms.
Am I right or wrong by assuming that it would make a difference in the bill?
Is there a downside?
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:24:52 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/21/2016 2:25:14 PM EST by Firefoxammo]
Closing the vent will not reduce your bill

All it does is stop heat from entering into that room via the vent
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:28:51 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefoxammo:
Closing the vent will not reduce your bill

All it does is stop heat from entering into that room via the vent
View Quote


Not saying heat won't get in the room anyway as they aren't insulated
And the cracks at doors etc. how doesn't it save heat??

The heat that would be going into that room is now going into other parts of the house.... thus heating faster and for less time running, unless he has thermostats in those rooms calling for heat
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:30:38 PM EST
Read this


Heres the best answer i can come up with without having to type it all out. Short answer is no it wont help.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:30:42 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Firefoxammo:
Closing the vent will not reduce your bill

All it does is stop heat from entering into that room via the vent
View Quote


I will disagree.

If you heated your garage, that would cost more per month.

If you heated your attic, that's a higher monthly cost.

We don't heat the space between dual pane windows, and that's what an unheated room acts as...an insulator from the outside environment.

Closing unneeded vents will pose a problem on a system that requires a certain amount of back pressure to operate efficiently. Just like using too thick of a filter will cause MERV rating problems. Operate within those parameters is what you need to make sure you are doing so that you don't lose efficiency (in turn, monthly cost) in that aspect.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:31:31 PM EST
My house has such shitty insulation that my living room windows get frosted with ice on the inside during the winter.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:32:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/21/2016 2:34:50 PM EST by Paul]
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:36:18 PM EST
I have hot water heat, only run one of the 3 zones unless we have company. Closed rooms stay about 50°, saves us a considerable amount of propane.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:38:34 PM EST
If each room has a proper return, it will make very little difference. If you didn't have ducts and had a central heater, yes, it would make a difference.

Link Posted: 12/21/2016 2:50:47 PM EST
[Last Edit: 12/21/2016 2:51:49 PM EST by AZ_Sky]
Try an experiment (when you have the time).

Set your furnace thermostat a couple of degrees above a set point, leave all the inside doors open then wait for the furnace to click on, time how long it takes for the furnace to reach the set point at turn off.
Then close some of the inside doors and wait for the temperature to drift back down to the trigger point and repeat the experiment to see if the furnace runs for a longer or shorter time to reach the turn off point.

My house is so open that it really doesn't make a difference.
 
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 4:38:19 PM EST
Probably not much help. The fuel source burns what it burns, the fan blows what it blows and only so much gets through any given vent opening. You might cycle off a hair sooner but probably not enough to really feel on a bill. In my house each room has a return so that space is not really impacting the air near the thermostat much.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 4:41:30 PM EST
Interesting, so i can open my vents back up..
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 5:22:05 PM EST
My mother blocked off the stairs and lived on the ground floor for a while.

Once when I visited I went upstairs and was shocked. Wallpaper had started peeling in places because of the moisture.

I repasted the paper, opened ALL of the upstairs doors and pulled the block out of the stairwell and told Ma to leave well enough alone.

I did leave the radiators upstairs off and simply let the heat naturally radiate upstairs. It was still chilly up there but there was enough moving air to cut down on the moisture problem.

I do believe if she had left it another year or two the studs would have dry rotted.

I did add a couple small computer type fans with solar panels to move the air a bit more some time later.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 5:26:59 PM EST
Outside walls of that part of the house will get cold.

Rest of house will be harder to heat.

Furnace may have to work overtime.

Go ahead guys, prove me wrong.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 5:30:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By StevesZZ5:


I will disagree.

If you heated your garage, that would cost more per month.

If you heated your attic, that's a higher monthly cost.

We don't heat the space between dual pane windows, and that's what an unheated room acts as...an insulator from the outside environment.

Closing unneeded vents will pose a problem on a system that requires a certain amount of back pressure to operate efficiently. Just like using too thick of a filter will cause MERV rating problems. Operate within those parameters is what you need to make sure you are doing so that you don't lose efficiency (in turn, monthly cost) in that aspect.
View Quote


No, it doesn't, because a (typical) room inside a house is not airtight - from the rest of the house.

A.W.D.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 5:45:21 PM EST
Originally Posted By nsl:
Just thinking I could save so money by not heating 2 unused rooms.
Am I right or wrong by assuming that it would make a difference in the bill?
Is there a downside?
View Quote


All that matters is what gets to your centrally located thermostat. Here in Florida, we at least keep the registers cracked to fight the humidity.
Link Posted: 12/21/2016 5:55:50 PM EST
In a newer home you may have an issue with moisture build up in a completely closed off, unheated room. An older house with drafty windows should be OK.
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